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    ...particularly Mechanical.
    Hi, I’m about to join Year 13 and decided about 4 years ago that I wanted to study Mechanical Engineering. I have read bits and pieces on the web about Mechanical Engineering and I find it incredibly interesting but I do not have any books that I can just read to get a further taste for the subject. I don’t want to read anything technical – just general basics maybe talking about things like thermodynamics.
    I’ve tried finding the right books but have not had much success. Could anyone suggest a book/books to me?
    Thanks
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    Engineering Mathematics by K. A. Stroud
    Mechanical Engineering Principles
    An introduction to mechanical engineering: Part 1
    Thermodynamic and Transport properties of Fluids
    Invention by Design: How Engineers Get from Thought to Thing
    Mechanical Engineering Principles
    Mechanical Engineering Science
    Mechanical Engineering 101: The TextVook
    Engineering Formulas
    Manual of Engineering Drawing: Technical product specification and Documentation to British and International Standards
    The last one may seem a bit useless, but it can be a good read, and will definitely become handy by the time you're @ uni.
    They're a few popular ones.
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    (Original post by halpme)
    Engineering Mathematics by K. A. Stroud
    Mechanical Engineering Principles
    An introduction to mechanical engineering: Part 1
    Thermodynamic and Transport properties of Fluids
    Invention by Design: How Engineers Get from Thought to Thing
    Mechanical Engineering Principles
    Mechanical Engineering Science
    Mechanical Engineering 101: The TextVook
    Engineering Formulas
    Manual of Engineering Drawing: Technical product specification and Documentation to British and International Standards
    The last one may seem a bit useless, but it can be a good read, and will definitely become handy by the time you're @ uni.
    They're a few popular ones.
    is that way too advanced for someone still in school?
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    (Original post by Jack93o)
    is that way too advanced for someone still in school?
    Not if you follow it from page 1. You also have the internet at your disposal, if you don't understand something in the book, google it.
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    (Original post by halpme)
    Not if you follow it from page 1. You also have the internet at your disposal, if you don't understand something in the book, google it.
    Thank you, I'll give a couple of those a shot
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    (Original post by Jack93o)
    is that way too advanced for someone still in school?

    Its the A-level syllabus, Further Maths and then a bit more.

    The advanced book then goes onto more advanced calculus and advanced topics which is normally taught in your second year or after you've gone through the basics at least.

    Textbooks are definitely the way to go. Don't forget:

    -Control
    -Structures and Materials
    -Electronics
    -Fluid Dynamics

    These are all major parts of an engineering syllabus that will be tailored to whatever engineering field you do study. I wouldn't recommend the engineering drawing book. It'll probably bore you half to death!

    I'd strongly recommend getting a hold of Matlab and messing around with that. Its very simple and has built in help commands and functions. Learning C/C++ will be a huge advantage too. You'll probably use CAD too or some similar 3D package so watch a few videos I guess - you can download that for free as a student too. You can try using FEA (I think thats a free download as well) for structures, but I'd wait on that one to be honest.
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    (Original post by djpailo)
    Its the A-level syllabus, Further Maths and then a bit more.

    The advanced book then goes onto more advanced calculus and advanced topics which is normally taught in your second year or after you've gone through the basics at least.

    Textbooks are definitely the way to go. Don't forget:

    -Control
    -Structures and Materials
    -Electronics
    -Fluid Dynamics

    These are all major parts of an engineering syllabus that will be tailored to whatever engineering field you do study. I wouldn't recommend the engineering drawing book. It'll probably bore you half to death!

    I'd strongly recommend getting a hold of Matlab and messing around with that. Its very simple and has built in help commands and functions. Learning C/C++ will be a huge advantage too. You'll probably use CAD too or some similar 3D package so watch a few videos I guess - you can download that for free as a student too. You can try using FEA (I think thats a free download as well) for structures, but I'd wait on that one to be honest.
    That does seem a bit beyond my area of knowledge - are you sure there aren't any simpl(ish) books I can read to stem my interest in the subject?
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    (Original post by Nick5757)
    Thanks
    To engineer is human - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Engineer-Hum.../dp/0679734163

    basic book that talks about success and failure of engineering. V.good for talking about in uni interview
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    (Original post by Nick5757)
    That does seem a bit beyond my area of knowledge - are you sure there aren't any simpl(ish) books I can read to stem my interest in the subject?
    hehe, don't worry, I mean, watching youtube videos, horizon, stuff like that, you'd be surprised how much you do pick up. Don't worry too much about the degree. You learn everything from scratch. Yes, it helps knowning stop beforehand, I was just trying to give you a heads up

    Khan academy channel on youtube is very good for general "tasters" in everything really. Definitely check that out!
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    (Original post by Nick5757)
    ...particularly Mechanical.
    Hi, I’m about to join Year 13 and decided about 4 years ago that I wanted to study Mechanical Engineering. I have read bits and pieces on the web about Mechanical Engineering and I find it incredibly interesting but I do not have any books that I can just read to get a further taste for the subject. I don’t want to read anything technical – just general basics maybe talking about things like thermodynamics.
    I’ve tried finding the right books but have not had much success. Could anyone suggest a book/books to me?
    Thanks
    I honestly wouldn't recommend reading university level textbooks since you're probably not going to get much out of them. They're designed to help university students with their studies, not function as reading material to pique interest in the subject.

    Instead I would recommend that you try and do some sort of practical project, since that'll be pretty unique (anyone can claim to have read such and such book, but very few people can claim to have tried their own individual project), and will also help when it comes to interviews for placements or a year in industry.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I honestly wouldn't recommend reading university level textbooks since you're probably not going to get much out of them. They're designed to help university students with their studies, not function as reading material to pique interest in the subject.

    Instead I would recommend that you try and do some sort of practical project, since that'll be pretty unique (anyone can claim to have read such and such book, but very few people can claim to have tried their own individual project), and will also help when it comes to interviews for placements or a year in industry.
    What sort of practical project?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I honestly wouldn't recommend reading university level textbooks since you're probably not going to get much out of them. They're designed to help university students with their studies, not function as reading material to pique interest in the subject.

    Instead I would recommend that you try and do some sort of practical project, since that'll be pretty unique (anyone can claim to have read such and such book, but very few people can claim to have tried their own individual project), and will also help when it comes to interviews for placements or a year in industry.
    I disagree, plenty of textbooks come in a format now where you can read for general interest. Anderson's Aerodynamics books are one such example.
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    (Original post by halpme)
    Not if you follow it from page 1. You also have the internet at your disposal, if you don't understand something in the book, google it.
    Are there any parts of the degree level stuff you would reccomend for someone who has just finished AS maths (and would be possible to do)? I just want to get a feel for higher level maths but obviously it is a 1200 page book so i dont know where to start in the higher section.
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    (Original post by NishalC)
    Are there any parts of the degree level stuff you would reccomend for someone who has just finished AS maths (and would be possible to do)? I just want to get a feel for higher level maths but obviously it is a 1200 page book so i dont know where to start in the higher section.
    Complex numbers: imaginary numbers, the algebra of complex numbers, complex roots of quadratic equations, cube roots of unity, Argand diagram, modulus and argument and their properties.
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/topics/ComplexNumbers.html
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/ArgandDiagram.html
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpywdu1afas
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Fm8aUyf1Yo
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOx8LRyr8mU
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPSj4-76eEc
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZozREqYkexQ
    There are links to individual videos about complex numbers, but, they all make series on them as far as I'm aware, some are part ones and others are about exponents and dividing etc, just hunt around for things that you need to know from them. Exam Solutions is a good place, so is Khan Academy.

    Or you could start doing some A2 Level mathematics .
 
 
 
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