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    Considering doing 5 subjects at AS (French, Eng Lit, Spanish, Econ & Philosophy/Ethics), though I know this is controversial; will it benefit or hinder my chances of getting into top unis and getting top grades?
    Thanks.
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    Hi it is a bad idea it is unlikely to help your university chances and will only likely result in lower overall grades.


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    Well pretty much all universities are fine with 4 AS levels, I would imagine having 5 AS levels would be looked at abit more favorably but only if the grades are good.
    For example it would be better to get 4 AS subjects with a solid A than do 5 AS subjects and like 3 A's and 2 B's.
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    i did 5 as and it was fine, just drop one or 2 for a2
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    Nobody ever recommends doing 5 A-levels if it doesn't include maths and further maths (because they are so closely related). Personally, I was thinking about doing 5 but thought I'd be better doing 4 so I would have more of a chance of getting good grades and so that I could do extra curricular stuff like the EPQ


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    It's a bad idea, especially for the first year. You'll have the shock of your life, when it comes to results day. You should choose 4 subjects maximum so by the end of the year, you'll know which subject to drop or pick 3 subject that you're really good at, and work hard like your life depends on it.


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    (Original post by RafaTennis)
    Considering doing 5 subjects at AS (French, Eng Lit, Spanish, Econ & Philosophy/Ethics), though I know this is controversial; will it benefit or hinder my chances of getting into top unis and getting top grades?
    Thanks.
    No university actively looks for students with 5 AS-Levels. If you have 4 AS you can focus on getting really high UMS on all of them so life is easier when applying to top unis and getting As and A*s will become slightly easier at A2. It's just not worth the hassle.
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    I really recommend 4.

    5 is way too much, but it's good if you do M and FM together, other than that blegh Dx
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    Best to get 4 good than 5 average
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    Plenty of people do five but there's no actual need to do so whatsoever. One good thing about starting with five is that you can see how you like them at AS and then drop one a few weeks in. Only do that if you'd be really stuck in deciding which not to do at this point, though.
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    (Original post by RafaTennis)
    Considering doing 5 subjects at AS (French, Eng Lit, Spanish, Econ & Philosophy/Ethics), though I know this is controversial; will it benefit or hinder my chances of getting into top unis and getting top grades?
    Thanks.
    I think it's a great idea if you're up to the challenge! At my school maybe 1/4 do five and most can manage. When you don't know any different you adapt to the workload much better than say if you did 4 then added an extra AS on.

    However, if you're just adding an extra subject for the sake of doing five I wouldn't advise it. It doesn't provide any significant advantage as long as you do well in your 4th AS as some Unis will offer AAAb for example (the b=4th AS). Saying that, UCL like AS levels so if you want to apply there in future it's more important. Also, you've got 2 chances to get a good grade in your 4th! Eg. if you got AAAAB it's better than AAAB as you'll still have an A in the 4th despite the B in the 5th.

    You need to love all your subjects and even if you don't, be able to commit the man-hours into each while your friends with 3 or 4 AS levels chill in their frees (First-hand experience of this, it's hella annoying!) :lol:
    If you feel confident that you can do well in all of them, I'd say go for it!

    I did 5 AS levels (Chem, Bio, French, Eng Lit, Maths) and just achieved 5 A grades with 92% UMS average and to tell you the truth, I'm not exactly a genius or the most organised person, I have 4 jobs/regular volunteering roles so my life isn't exactly devoted to study! Just saying it can be done!

    Maybe what I would advise is thinking about if there are any subjects there that you have a natural flair for? For me it was English Lit so compared to my peers the workload wasn't as daunting and I found it easier to achieve high grades. (100% in all my modules yo!) But Chemistry, Maths French I had to work like a b*tch! :lol:

    Whatever happens, don't let people pressure you either way! Do what you feel you are capable of, you can always drop the 5th in the first term if it's too much!

    Good luck, happy to advise if you need!
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    Do it only if you are a smart person who can manage the workload. Consult with your parents and school tutor. Make sure you have good GCSE knowledge of those subjects and are willing to put in the work to learn them properly. Otherwise you are going to regret you have taken them.

    It maybe a good idea if you are applying to top universities such as Oxbridge, UCL, ICL and LSE, but officially they say they only care about 4 AS and 3 A2s. But if you can pull of getting good marks in all of them, it will show to them that you are a committed learner. It is certainly possible to do them, but make sure it is right choice for you.
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    Having the possibility of ¬10 AS exams in 1 period is very tough and i would not reccomend it personally.

    I think there were only 3 people out of 120ish in my year who did 5 AS levels. One got AAABB, another got AAABD and another something like AABCC.

    AAAB looks far better than AABCC. It will be a strong determinant come university applications, and considering you have 2 languages.... It will be tough. Just remember, because you got an A* at it at GCSE, does not mean you will be good at it come A level is something many a level students can gladly say ^^

    I would say take 5 from the start if you wish... but drop one as soon as you feel the burden of work constraining you.

    Top universities dont give you a damn if you did 4 or 5. They just want good grades with a good sign of potential. However if you get shoddy grades, chances of getting a high end spot is extremely slim.
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    Thanks everyone! Very useful insights. Thinking I might try out 5 then drop 1 in the first term if it all feels too much; thing is I really like all my subjects and will find it very hard to drop any!
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    its not a brilliant idea, some university's don't even accept as levels at all. I would not risk it.
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    although I may be mistaken, are you planning to drop 2 and carry on with 3 of them, if you are then its a good idea if you feel you can do it.
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    (Original post by Emma122)
    although I may be mistaken, are you planning to drop 2 and carry on with 3 of them, if you are then its a good idea if you feel you can do it.
    Yeah I might drop 2 and do 3 at A2.
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    if you do it you need to work SO BLOODY HARD and make sure it's actually going to help you get into uni so look because most don't consider as grades unless you're going to Oxbridge!!
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    I was considering doing 5 (Eng Lit,History,Sociology,Psych,and Philosophy) because I really wanted to do Sociology at AS as it's similar to the GCSE course I've just done,but it seems so much extra work/hassle for a subject not even respected that much.The Pros are that it could boost your UMS scores,if you're taking a variety of subjects it could broaden your prospects (eg if you take a mixture of a language,sciences and art subjects) of what uni courses you can apply for.But the Cons are that you won't have any free periods,more work,less free time and it would most likely mean you would be stretched and divided in your studying focus and routine so might not do as well in your exams. I know that unis like Durham seem to like it when people take 4-A Levels as opposed to 3 for some reason,but I don't think it really matters the number of subjects you do,as long as you do well in them.
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    The majority of TSR is going to say it's a bad idea.

    Personally I think:
    French
    Spanish
    English Lit
    Economics
    Philosophy

    Would be a killer combo for ANY non science degree.

    However, it's a bit of an essay workload... And I'd probably not do those 5. Perhaps see how your workload is and drop one if it's too much.

    From those I'd drop Philosophy.
 
 
 
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