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    I've been thinking about going into teaching but I'm not sure if I'd be a good teacher because I'm not very confident. I had a part-time job as a teaching assistant while I was at uni and I really enjoyed it and I got very positive feedback from the department. I mostly worked with small groups though and I worked at a good school in a nice area so I'm not sure if I'd be able to handle kids who don't want to learn. One of my friends did a PGCE and she was placed in two schools in rough areas in East London and she had a really difficult time so I'm quite worried. I'm thinking about going into secondary teaching (modern languages) or possibly teaching adults. I'm not very good with young children so primary school teaching wouldn't be a option for me.

    Any thoughts?
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    (Original post by ginger.)
    I've been thinking about going into teaching but I'm not sure if I'd be a good teacher because I'm not very confident. I had a part-time job as a teaching assistant while I was at uni and I really enjoyed it and I got very positive feedback from the department. I mostly worked with small groups though and I worked at a good school in a nice area so I'm not sure if I'd be able to handle kids who don't want to learn. One of my friends did a PGCE and she was placed in two schools in rough areas in East London and she had a really difficult time so I'm quite worried. I'm thinking about going into secondary teaching (modern languages) or possibly teaching adults. I'm not very good with young children so primary school teaching wouldn't be a option for me.

    Any thoughts?
    Don't worry about not being very confident- most teachers will feel like this at first then the confidence grows, like with anything new you start! Dealing with behaviour is a big challenge in teaching, and getting a job in a good area is harder than in a rough area. Do you think you could stand in front of 30 teenagers whilst 1 is hurling abuse and swear words at you? Although you may struggle with behaviour at first, it'll be one of those things you should get used and know how to handle to as you build up your experience. If I was you I'd get some work experience in an average/rough school, maybe just observing lessons for a few days. This might give you a better idea of what it can be like in the majority of schools where the grass is not greener. Good luck. x
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    (Original post by Alix_js)
    Don't worry about not being very confident- most teachers will feel like this at first then the confidence grows, like with anything new you start! Dealing with behaviour is a big challenge in teaching, and getting a job in a good area is harder than in a rough area. Do you think you could stand in front of 30 teenagers whilst 1 is hurling abuse and swear words at you? Although you may struggle with behaviour at first, it'll be one of those things you should get used and know how to handle to as you build up your experience. If I was you I'd get some work experience in an average/rough school, maybe just observing lessons for a few days. This might give you a better idea of what it can be like in the majority of schools where the grass is not greener. Good luck. x
    Thanks a lot! That's a really good idea actually, I will try to get some experience in a rough school so I know better what to expect. I'm not sure, I'm not worried about standing in front of 30 teenagers (I sometimes worked with the whole class when I was a teaching assistant) and if it was just one child I'd probably be ok. I just don't think I could deal with it if I was getting abuse from the majority of the class (which is what happened to my friend), I guess she was very unlucky though.

    I know every school's different but is it generally more difficult to teach in London or would it be exactly the same in any rough area?
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    Despite what the damn news says, I think teaching is a wonderful career, RECENTLY it's getting more difficult, but what job isn't?

    If this is your dream, go at it full throttle.
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    (Original post by Lord Frieza)
    Despite what the damn news says, I think teaching is a wonderful career, RECENTLY it's getting more difficult, but what job isn't?

    If this is your dream, go at it full throttle.
    Thanks! I know, I really enjoyed working in a school so I definitely won't give up. I'm mostly worried because of my friend's experiences but I think she might just have been very unlucky.
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    (Original post by ginger.)
    Thanks! I know, I really enjoyed working in a school so I definitely won't give up. I'm mostly worried because of my friend's experiences but I think she might just have been very unlucky.
    Yes, there will be bad schools and you might be placed in them. However, you can choose to not apply to those kinds of schools for jobs after the pgce. Working in a school where the kids don't want to learn and have behaviour problems will be good for your development as a teacher, don't be afraid of it. You'll get support from your uni and mentor with the issues you face too.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Yes, there will be bad schools and you might be placed in them. However, you can choose to not apply to those kinds of schools for jobs after the pgce. Working in a school where the kids don't want to learn and have behaviour problems will be good for your development as a teacher, don't be afraid of it. You'll get support from your uni and mentor with the issues you face too.
    True, makes sense! I'm just worried that it would affect my confidence if I got abuse from my students every single day. It was that bad in my friend's school that she thought about quitting her PGCE but I'm sure she learned a lot. She also managed to get a job in a good school so it was all worth it in the end.
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    Any placement in schools that have kids with challenging behaviour is going to be a learning curve. But it's only 12 weeks and you know there is light at the end of the tunnel! I know that personally I wouldn't enjoy lots of difficult classes, however sometimes when you get through to them it's an amazing feeling. The victories are all the sweeter!

    I'm pretty quiet generally but you just get more confident. The best advice I was given is that teaching is an act. I'm not me when I'm teaching, which is a bizarre thing to say! It's another persona.
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    (Original post by Lord Frieza)
    Despite what the damn news says, I think teaching is a wonderful career, RECENTLY it's getting more difficult, but what job isn't?

    If this is your dream, go at it full throttle.
    I hope you don't mind me asking, but do you teach Primary or Secondary and why did you decide to teach that age group?
 
 
 
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