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    I just got back my A2 results and I got an A in Biology and C's in Chemistry and Physics. I'm only a few UMS off of B's so I'm going to resit some modules next year.

    I was planning on doing a third year at college anyway to do A2 Psychology and fast track (AS and A2 in one year) . I'm going to be applying to university this year.

    I was originally going to apply to university last year but I had no idea what to study or where to go so I decided to do a third college year and apply then. Now, a year later and I'm in practically the same position.

    I enjoy both Psychology and Biology and manage to do quite well in them (got a B in Psychology AS only 1 UMS from an A and got an A in Biology with 100% in two of my exams). I'm torn between studying something that's more enjoyable (psychology) or something that I also enjoy to a lesser extent but is more respectable and rewarding (Biology).

    I've heard of joint honors but I'm not sure if they're as respectable as single honors? Obviously you're going to be studying both subjects in less depth which is what concerns me. Another thing is that if I study Biology I am adamant that I don't want to go into any kind of science related profession. I dislike lab work so I couldn't be a researcher and I don't want to work in the medical field. Whereas psychology leads to a few jobs that I quite like the idea of - educational psychologist, etc.

    I'm really grateful to anyone who has read this rambly post. Thank you.
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    Do what you want to do, not what you think others will be more proud of you for doing.
    If you think you'll enjoy psychology more and there's jobs you like the idea of, go for that!

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
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    (Original post by Mocking_bird)
    Do what you want to do, not what you think others will be more proud of you for doing.
    If you think you'll enjoy psychology more and there's jobs you like the idea of, go for that!

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
    UCL does a degree in history and philosophy of science and Leeds does it as joint honours.
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    (Original post by Mocking_bird)
    Do what you want to do, not what you think others will be more proud of you for doing.
    If you think you'll enjoy psychology more and there's jobs you like the idea of, go for that!

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    UCL does a degree in history and philosophy of science and Leeds does it as joint honours.
    I was thinking of doing psychology combined with neuroscience? I think the two would overlap nicely but I'm worried that it will mean I can only get jobs in the scientific side of things rather than being an educational psychologist.
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    (Original post by lovex)
    I was thinking of doing psychology combined with neuroscience? I think the two would overlap nicely but I'm worried that it will mean I can only get jobs in the scientific side of things rather than being an educational psychologist.
    I have no knowledge about psychology but if it was made compulsory that every burger flipper had to have a degree in psychology, there would still be a surfeit of psychology grads.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I have no knowledge about psychology but if it was made compulsory that every burger flipper had to have a degree in psychology, there would still be a surfeit of psychology grads.
    Sorry?
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    (Original post by lovex)
    Sorry?
    Over 16,000 students are accepted to read psychology every year, third only to nursing and law.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Over 16,000 students are accepted to read psychology every year, third only to nursing and law.
    And is there anything wrong with that?
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    (Original post by lovex)
    And is there anything wrong with that?
    Most people who read history and English do not expect to have a career in the subject. Probably most people who read law do expect to have a career in it at least when they start. About 4 out 5 will be disappointed. An awful lot of the people who read psychology seem to want a career in it; probably not as many as law but still a sizeable number. Psychology in all its forms is a tiny profession. For example, the Association of Educational Psychologists has, according to Wikipedia 3,386 members.
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    (Original post by sempitern)
    I feel for you as I really was quite lost when I chose my degree subject. I knew for sure that I wanted to go to university and loved studying but just didn't know what I wanted in my career.

    I did a joint honours. I don't think you need to worry too much about reputation. Joint honours degrees are very reputable. In fact from a certain perspective, it can be rather false economy in many professions to specialise too much. To expand on what I mean, my colleagues in my field (business management) who have a dual honours in psychology and economics are really strongly equipped in their chosen field rather than a person who has a single honours degree.

    I can think of one friend who did a dual honours and had an issue later. This was related to number of modules covered. He studied Psychology and a language and later chose to pursue educational psychology. Before he could pursue his masters degree he had to complete two extra modules. The university in question had no problem with the reputation of his joint honours, they just wanted more subject coverage before they signed him onto a master's course for a given career path. And, to expand further, this was not at all universities, but at the particular one that he chose and wanted to study at.

    I am interested in why you want to study fast track history. Is there another area that you are potentially interested in studying / as a career path?

    And to echo the above reply - enjoyment is everything. If you enjoy your degree you are more likely to throw yourself into it and achieve a better classification (and have a much more enjoyable time) so if you are really not sure, a joint honours course might actually be perfect for you. I found that a joint honours degree really opened up my eyes about the interdisciplinary nature of all subjects. It surprised me how much material overlapped (theoretical especially) across the subjects. This changed my view of the world to a degree. Excuse the unintended pun.
    Thank you so much for your response. I feel relieved to hear that joint honours are still respected. I'm only studying fast track history to maintain my position as a full time student at my college and to milk the last year of free education to be honest. However, I think the essay skills learnt will be useful, too.
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    Hello! First of all, if you decide to study psychology, you might want to consider whether the degree is accredited by the British Psychological Society - a non-accredited degree is likely to limit your options when it comes to employment within the field of psychology. Google 'BPS' and then look through their list of accredited courses. This course at Reading is a psychology and biology joint honours degree, and it appears to be accredited by both the BPS and the Institute of Biology, which would keep your options open for a career in either psychology or biology (I'd advise emailing the department/s to ensure that it is definitely accredited before applying, though the website seems to suggest that it is): http://www.reading.ac.uk/pcls/ug/psy...y-biology.aspx.

    With regards to neuroscience, I'm reasonably sure a joint honours degree in psychology and neuroscience would not limit you to working within neuroscience as long as it is BPS accredited.Essentially, if you're looking to work within psychology, make sure your degree is BPS accredited. And as others have said, studying something you enjoy is probably the way to go!
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    (Original post by la95)
    Hello! First of all, if you decide to study psychology, you might want to consider whether the degree is accredited by the British Psychological Society - a non-accredited degree is likely to limit your options when it comes to employment within the field of psychology. Google 'BPS' and then look through their list of accredited courses. This course at Reading is a psychology and biology joint honours degree, and it appears to be accredited by both the BPS and the Institute of Biology, which would keep your options open for a career in either psychology or biology (I'd advise emailing the department/s to ensure that it is definitely accredited before applying, though the website seems to suggest that it is): http://www.reading.ac.uk/pcls/ug/psy...y-biology.aspx.

    With regards to neuroscience, I'm reasonably sure a joint honours degree in psychology and neuroscience would not limit you to working within neuroscience as long as it is BPS accredited.Essentially, if you're looking to work within psychology, make sure your degree is BPS accredited. And as others have said, studying something you enjoy is probably the way to go!
    Thank you. I will look into the course at Reading.
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    (Original post by lovex)
    Thank you. I will look into the course at Reading.
    No worries! There are probably other similar courses out there if that type of course takes your fancy.
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    (Original post by lovex)
    I just got back my A2 results and I got an A in Biology and C's in Chemistry and Physics. I'm only a few UMS off of B's so I'm going to resit some modules next year.

    I was planning on doing a third year at college anyway to do A2 Psychology and fast track (AS and A2 in one year) . I'm going to be applying to university this year.

    I was originally going to apply to university last year but I had no idea what to study or where to go so I decided to do a third college year and apply then. Now, a year later and I'm in practically the same position.

    I enjoy both Psychology and Biology and manage to do quite well in them (got a B in Psychology AS only 1 UMS from an A and got an A in Biology with 100% in two of my exams). I'm torn between studying something that's more enjoyable (psychology) or something that I also enjoy to a lesser extent but is more respectable and rewarding (Biology).

    I've heard of joint honors but I'm not sure if they're as respectable as single honors? Obviously you're going to be studying both subjects in less depth which is what concerns me. Another thing is that if I study Biology I am adamant that I don't want to go into any kind of science related profession. I dislike lab work so I couldn't be a researcher and I don't want to work in the medical field. Whereas psychology leads to a few jobs that I quite like the idea of - educational psychologist, etc.

    I'm really grateful to anyone who has read this rambly post. Thank you.
    http://search.ucas.com/course/summar...62&ret=results

    This degree may be ideal for you
 
 
 
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