jaez121
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Lethorio
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Hey, I'll be starting Biomedical Science this year, but I might be able to help.

1) http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/li...ses/biomedsci/
2) http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjec...0007163-U-C1B9
3) I'm not sure if it will help at all, but there's a book list on this page: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/li.../ug/prearrival

Not sure how much helpful this is to you, but hopefully I helped at least a little bit.
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Loopy456
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Hi

I've just finished my second year so I can help you guys out.

1) That link from Lethorio shows all the modules. They're all fairly interesting. The options were (when I did them) Quantitative Biology, Environmental Biology, Animal and Plant Biology, Health and the Community and a psychology module. This might have changed but I think it was the same last year so maybe not.

2) When I did the first year exams (bear in mind that this was two years ago), there was a variety of exam styles, including half MCQ, half short answers (PGG, I think), just multiple choice (AID and Phys and Met), computer-based (Biostats) and half short answers, half essay (optional modules). Cells, Tissues and Organisms wasn't a module when I did first year, so I can't tell you about that.

3) There isn't really a syllabus so to speak, but I can give you an idea of each of the modules-
- PGG is your basic grounding in human biology (lots of eukaryotic cell structure and transcription/translation sorts of things)
- AID is an introduction to immunology, microbiology and virology, with a bit of population biology thrown in
- Phys and Met is quite a bit of biochemistry in the Met section (the reactions that make up respiration and photosynthesis mainly) and the Phys stuff is split up into sections like respiratory physiology, cardio, muscle function etc.
- Biostats is all done on Excel, about learning how to interpret experimental data (a lot of people struggle a bit in this module, just to warn you, but there is a new Mac Suite with c. 150 Macs which the lectures are taught in and makes it about a thousand times easier than when I did the course)
- Health and the Community (an optional) is about stuff like water-borne diseases and food poisoning and disease outbreaks, with a bit of bioterrorism thrown in which was brilliant and everyone's favourite part (I would really recommend doing this module as a biomed - it's the only one which is properly relevant to the course)
- Animal and Plant Biology (an optional) is basically simple evolution with certain bits focused on (frogs and sponges spring to mind...) - a lot of biomeds hate it because it is hard and not relevant so people don't want to bother trying, but if you're vaguely interested in evolution it is good, although I found the plant bit awfully dull despite enjoying the animal/human side

I hope that helps you, and I'm really happy to answer any more specific questions you might have You'll enjoy Warwick - it's amazing!
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Lethorio
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Sounds like a lot of stuff that isn't on the module list. That's worrying. I'm not at all interested in ecology and the reason why I was so excited about this course was that it contained a lot of physiology, immunology, virology, etc. Bioterrorism doesn't immediately strike me as something I'd be massively interested in, either.
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Loopy456
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(Original post by Lethorio)
Sounds like a lot of stuff that isn't on the module list. That's worrying. I'm not at all interested in ecology and the reason why I was so excited about this course was that it contained a lot of physiology, immunology, virology, etc. Bioterrorism doesn't immediately strike me as something I'd be massively interested in, either.
It can be really hard to predict the content from just a list of modules, but I'd say that the compulsory modules are pretty much what you'd expect them to be. They give you a good grounding in all the fundamental principles that you need to build on in second and third year.

If you're not at all interested in ecology (like most people on biomed, really) then I'd recommend doing Health and the Community and Quantitative Biology. I didn't do Quants because it sounded so boring, but my friends who did said it was amazingly helpful with lab reports and so on, so doing that module could really put you at an advantage, especially as hardly anyone does it because it sounds so dull.

There is a lot of phys, immuno and viro, especially once you get to second year, so you've definitely got that to look forward to.

Bioterrorism is about three lectures in one module of, I think, 30 lectures in total, so don't let it put you off doing Health and the Community, which is definitely the most relevant of the optional modules for biomeds. Although you never know, you might find that you enjoy it! I'd say that 90% of people on my course loved it.

I can give you some more details on anything specific that you'd like to know about if you want - how much a certain topic is covered within a module or whatever. The odd few lectures change year to year but as far as I know there have been no drastic changes in the last few years, so I could probably give you a good idea.
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jaez121
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(Original post by Loopy456)
Hi

I've just finished my second year so I can help you guys out.

1) That link from Lethorio shows all the modules. They're all fairly interesting. The options were (when I did them) Quantitative Biology, Environmental Biology, Animal and Plant Biology, Health and the Community and a psychology module. This might have changed but I think it was the same last year so maybe not.

2) When I did the first year exams (bear in mind that this was two years ago), there was a variety of exam styles, including half MCQ, half short answers (PGG, I think), just multiple choice (AID and Phys and Met), computer-based (Biostats) and half short answers, half essay (optional modules). Cells, Tissues and Organisms wasn't a module when I did first year, so I can't tell you about that.

3) There isn't really a syllabus so to speak, but I can give you an idea of each of the modules-
- PGG is your basic grounding in human biology (lots of eukaryotic cell structure and transcription/translation sorts of things)
- AID is an introduction to immunology, microbiology and virology, with a bit of population biology thrown in
- Phys and Met is quite a bit of biochemistry in the Met section (the reactions that make up respiration and photosynthesis mainly) and the Phys stuff is split up into sections like respiratory physiology, cardio, muscle function etc.
- Biostats is all done on Excel, about learning how to interpret experimental data (a lot of people struggle a bit in this module, just to warn you, but there is a new Mac Suite with c. 150 Macs which the lectures are taught in and makes it about a thousand times easier than when I did the course)
- Health and the Community (an optional) is about stuff like water-borne diseases and food poisoning and disease outbreaks, with a bit of bioterrorism thrown in which was brilliant and everyone's favourite part (I would really recommend doing this module as a biomed - it's the only one which is properly relevant to the course)
- Animal and Plant Biology (an optional) is basically simple evolution with certain bits focused on (frogs and sponges spring to mind...) - a lot of biomeds hate it because it is hard and not relevant so people don't want to bother trying, but if you're vaguely interested in evolution it is good, although I found the plant bit awfully dull despite enjoying the animal/human side

I hope that helps you, and I'm really happy to answer any more specific questions you might have You'll enjoy Warwick - it's amazing!
Thank you so much for explaining it, your a big star


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Rachel0
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So I just did one year of Biomed at Warwick before changing course (just because I didn't feel it was a useful degree for me personally).

Loopy456 explained the modules really well but I think that it's worth mentioning that on top of that you may have to do a Chemistry for Biologists unit if you didn't do Chem at A Level, instead of one of the other optional modules. I had to do this and it was really helpful because a big amount of PGG requires you to understand chemistry so for the first half of the first term I barely understood this module... Anyway, Chemistry for Biologists was assessed by a set of take-home questions at the end of term 1 and an online multiple choice test in term 3 which, if you've done the online classwork every week, is pretty easy.

Another optional module you have is that you can over-CAT and do Brain and Behaviour. I wasn't allowed to take it because Chem already counted as my external module, but it's run by the psychology department and is supposed to be really interesting but is a hell of a lot of work.

On op of your written, multiple choice and online exams you'll also be assessed through your lab work - we had 2 every 3 weeks and had to write a 3 page (not including images) lab report for each one. And you'll be assessed for your tutorial work and things like assessed essays through out the year but this is relatively small in comparison with other modules.
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goodtogallop
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I've just graduated from Warwick biomed... my biggest regret from my time at uni is not taking quantitative biology, its a really really useful module to have and the skills are really worth having, whatever you do afterwards. The module structure for first year was a bit different back then but instead of quant biol I did Animal and Plant biology which I thought was a complete waste of time! I agree with whoever said Health & Community is the most Biomed-y module in first year - most of the stuff thats now in that module was incorporated into AID when i was a first year and its all really good stuff to know
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Zooz22
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(Original post by Rachel0)
So I just did one year of Biomed at Warwick before changing course (just because I didn't feel it was a useful degree for me personally).

Loopy456 explained the modules really well but I think that it's worth mentioning that on top of that you may have to do a Chemistry for Biologists unit if you didn't do Chem at A Level, instead of one of the other optional modules. I had to do this and it was really helpful because a big amount of PGG requires you to understand chemistry so for the first half of the first term I barely understood this module... Anyway, Chemistry for Biologists was assessed by a set of take-home questions at the end of term 1 and an online multiple choice test in term 3 which, if you've done the online classwork every week, is pretty easy.

Another optional module you have is that you can over-CAT and do Brain and Behaviour. I wasn't allowed to take it because Chem already counted as my external module, but it's run by the psychology department and is supposed to be really interesting but is a hell of a lot of work.

On op of your written, multiple choice and online exams you'll also be assessed through your lab work - we had 2 every 3 weeks and had to write a 3 page (not including images) lab report for each one. And you'll be assessed for your tutorial work and things like assessed essays through out the year but this is relatively small in comparison with other modules.

Hi, just wondering which course did you switch to? Was it very closely related to biomedical science?
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Lethorio
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(Original post by Loopy456)
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(Original post by Rachel0)
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I'm going to have to do the Chemistry for Biological Sciences module, as I didn't do A2 Chemistry. How many other optional modules do you get in the first year?

Thanks.
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Loopy456
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(Original post by Lethorio)
I'm going to have to do the Chemistry for Biological Sciences module, as I didn't do A2 Chemistry. How many other optional modules do you get in the first year?

Thanks.
Just the one more, and you won't be allowed to do the psychology module because that's a much larger one. As a biomed I would really recommend your second one being Health and the Community, but it's obviously up to you.
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Lethorio
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(Original post by Loopy456)
Just the one more, and you won't be allowed to do the psychology module because that's a much larger one. As a biomed I would really recommend your second one being Health and the Community, but it's obviously up to you.
Yeah, I think I'll be going for Health and the Community. Seems like a shame that I wouldn't be able to take Quantitative Biology in addition, particularly as it has been recommended in this thread.
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Rachel0
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(Original post by Zooz22)
Hi, just wondering which course did you switch to? Was it very closely related to biomedical science?
(Original post by Lethorio)
I'm going to have to do the Chemistry for Biological Sciences module, as I didn't do A2 Chemistry. How many other optional modules do you get in the first year?

Thanks.
Nope I switched to Management so it's completely different

It wasn't that there's anything wrong with the Life Sciences department, it's not, their great. I just realised science wasn't really for me, I wanted something a little less exact, something that I was allowed to have opinions in and I figured a business degree was going to teach me some genuinely useful skills (for the sort of job I want to go into after uni), rather than to just remember facts.

You might get away with not having to do the Chem module if you did it for AS so if that's the case you'll be able to take Brain and Behaviour and Animal and Plant or Health and Community or both internal modules. If you just have the choice between the two internal ones if you do have to do Chem though I'd recommend Health and Community as I did find it really interesting and fitted in with AID quite nicely but if you find plant biology interesting then by all means choose that, it's up to you
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Lethorio
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(Original post by Rachel0)
You might get away with not having to do the Chem module if you did it for AS so if that's the case you'll be able to take Brain and Behaviour and Animal and Plant or Health and Community or both internal modules. If you just have the choice between the two internal ones if you do have to do Chem though I'd recommend Health and Community as I did find it really interesting and fitted in with AID quite nicely but if you find plant biology interesting then by all means choose that, it's up to you
I did an Access course, so not much Chemistry at all. I'll definitely have to take the Chem for Biologists module, but I don't mind that at all.
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Loopy456
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(Original post by Lethorio)
Yeah, I think I'll be going for Health and the Community. Seems like a shame that I wouldn't be able to take Quantitative Biology in addition, particularly as it has been recommended in this thread.
I might be wrong and I wouldn't want for you to rely on this at all, but I think there is potential for over-CATing in first year (i.e. going over your allocated number of credits, which is 120 per year).

I believe one of my friends did one extra optional module in first year (which is the maximum you can go over by - it's not like other departments like maths where you can go up to 180 CATs per year and they hardly blink), but I wasn't friends with her until second year so I'm not absolutely certain. Even if she did, it might have changed for you, but it might be worth asking the Director of Undergrad Studies (Dr Leppard) when you get there. If you can put forward a case for wanting to do Chemistry plus two options they might well let you.

There is a definite precedent set for this because anyone who does the psychology module (Brain and Behaviour) will be going over by 8 CATs (doing one extra would push you over by 12), and the biochemists over-CAT by a few anyway because of their extra compulsory modules. I also know that they were prepared to let a friend of mine over-CAT by 30 CATs in second year by doing a French module.

I'm not in any way suggesting that you rely on this because I would hate to mislead you, but if it's something you might be interested in you should definitely think of inquiring about it. Quants is definitely a useful thing to have and I wish I'd done it.
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Lethorio
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(Original post by Loopy456)
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I'll see what happens. I don't want to massively overburden myself with work, especially if it potentially won't count. Health and the Community is definitely something I'd be interested in, but as Quants has been praised so highly in this thread, and sounds as if it's something that could help me with other parts of the course, it's very tempting.
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PianoMan512
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Thanks for all the info guys! Just a quick question, I've been trawling through the university website and sending countless emails, but I can't seem to find out if there's a suggested prior reading list for Biomedical Science? Wasn't sure if any of you had found one or could recommend any useful material just to get started?
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Lethorio
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(Original post by PianoMan512)
Thanks for all the info guys! Just a quick question, I've been trawling through the university website and sending countless emails, but I can't seem to find out if there's a suggested prior reading list for Biomedical Science? Wasn't sure if any of you had found one or could recommend any useful material just to get started?
The book list is here: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/li.../ug/prearrival

You could probably have a skim through the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology books, as it seems they're the first few modules.
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Rachel0
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I remember when I did it they either emailed or sent me a reading list a couple of weeks before the start of term so you might get something like that? Otherwise, they'll give you one the first week of term probably - that's what WBS does now
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goodtogallop
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I have a few essential textbooks for sale if anyone wants them - 6th Edition of Biochemistry (berg/tymczko/stryer), Brock, Biology of Microorganisms (12th Ed.) Madigan and Martinko, and an old immunology one (cant remember the title or author off the top of my head). The first two are in brilliant condition, the last is older and a bit more battered but still good.

Can meet on campus around the start of term if anyone wants them, save on postage costs. PM me if interested
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