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OCR Physics - Definitions help? watch

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    Hi,
    I've been given summer work to do for physics so I am well prepared for the start of lessons in September, however, I got given a list of vocabulary I need to find the definition of, but I can't find anything online!
    Could anyone of you helpful people define some for me? (There's quite a few...)

    1) Tough
    2) Hard
    3) Brittle
    4) Ceramics
    5) Composites
    6) Breaking stress
    7) Yield stress
    8) Tensile stress
    9) Compressive strength
    10) Stress
    11) Strain
    12) Young's modulus
    13) Ductile
    14) Malleable
    15) Flexible
    16) Elastic deformation
    17) Plastic deformation

    Thank you!
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    (Original post by lilypear)
    Hi,
    I've been given summer work to do for physics so I am well prepared for the start of lessons in September, however, I got given a list of vocabulary I need to find the definition of, but I can't find anything online!
    Could anyone of you helpful people define some for me? (There's quite a few...)
    Thank you!
    You really can't find anything online? You do know there's this website, called google.com, where if you type in "define: x" a card will come up with the definition of x! (as well as a whole load of websites on x). Anyway here are some I know - Have fun studying A level Physics!

    Spoiler:
    Show

    1) Tough - material will deform plastically before breaking thus absorbing energy
    2) Hard - hard? material that requires a large force to be deformed.
    3) Brittle - A brittle material does not deform plastically prior to fracture.
    4) Ceramics An example of a hard and brittle material which is clay that has been heated
    5) Composites - strong lightweight material developed in the laboratory; fibers of more than one kind are bonded together chemically.
    6) Breaking stress - the stress at which a material breaks
    8) Tensile stress - Tensile strength is defined as a stress, which is measured as force per unit area
    9) Compressive strength
    10) Stress - force F per unit cross-sectional area A. Stress = F/A
    11) Strain - extension Δx per unit length L. Strain = Δx/L
    12) Young's modulus - stress/strain = FL/(AΔx) Typically, for steel, the Young modulus = 2 × 10^11 Pa
    13) Ductile - a material you can draw into a wire
    14) Malleable - a material you can hammer into shape
    15) Flexible - a material that when bends is only elastically deformed.
    16) Elastic deformation - After elastic deformation a material returns to its original size. Energy stored as Elastic potential energy.
    17) Plastic deformation - deformation where energy is lost and the material is permanently deformed. Energy converted to heat.
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    You really can't find anything online? You do know there's this website, called google.com, where if you type in "define: x" a card will come up with the definition of x! (as well as a whole load of websites on x). Anyway here are some I know - Have fun studying A level Physics!

    Spoiler:
    Show

    1) Tough - material will deform plastically before breaking thus absorbing energy
    2) Hard - hard? material that requires a large force to be deformed.
    3) Brittle - A brittle material does not deform plastically prior to fracture.
    4) Ceramics An example of a hard and brittle material which is clay that has been heated
    5) Composites - strong lightweight material developed in the laboratory; fibers of more than one kind are bonded together chemically.
    6) Breaking stress - the stress at which a material breaks
    8) Tensile stress - Tensile strength is defined as a stress, which is measured as force per unit area
    9) Compressive strength
    10) Stress - force F per unit cross-sectional area A. Stress = F/A
    11) Strain - extension Δx per unit length L. Strain = Δx/L
    12) Young's modulus - stress/strain = FL/(AΔx) Typically, for steel, the Young modulus = 2 × 10^11 Pa
    13) Ductile - a material you can draw into a wire
    14) Malleable - a material you can hammer into shape
    15) Flexible - a material that when bends is only elastically deformed.
    16) Elastic deformation - After elastic deformation a material returns to its original size. Energy stored as Elastic potential energy.
    17) Plastic deformation - deformation where energy is lost and the material is permanently deformed. Energy converted to heat.
    Thank you so much, I was worried the basic definitions weren't what I was meant to be looking for! Thank you so much :-)


    No...No...
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    They are all in the back of the OCR physics book.
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    (Original post by Economi)
    They are all in the back of the OCR physics book.
    Can I buy this textbook from anywhere?
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    (Original post by Economi)
    They are all in the back of the OCR physics book.
    The OP is starting the course in september, so they won't have the textbook!

    (Original post by lilypear)
    Can I buy this textbook from anywhere?
    You'll get the textbook in september (unless your school is really broke / the Head of the Department wasted the budget on superconductors and liquid nitrogen)
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    The OP is starting the course in september, so they won't have the textbook!



    You'll get the textbook in september (unless your school is really broke / the Head of the Department wasted the budget on superconductors and liquid nitrogen)
    I had to buy all my textbooks, so I assumed they would have it in time for term.
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    The OP is starting the course in september, so they won't have the textbook!



    You'll get the textbook in september (unless your school is really broke / the Head of the Department wasted the budget on superconductors and liquid nitrogen)
    I might be lucky to be given one, however my school blows their money on building new buildings than the students :P

    Did you take Physics for A level?!
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    (Original post by lilypear)
    Can I buy this textbook from anywhere?
    Yes, but I wouldn't bother if your school provides them.
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    (Original post by lilypear)
    I might be lucky to be given one, however my school blows their money on building new buildings than the students :P

    Did you take Physics for A level?!
    That's kind of strange, I'd expect the school to have its own textbooks, especially for A level (obviously the need for resources is less so for GCSE and below, but for A level?) - what happens if someone can't buy one - Wouldn't that just be really awkward for everyone?

    Yes, I'm taking A level Physics (I did AS this June). Obviously if you need to buy one, the best one is just the official OCR one, which is on Amazon. Though if you're doing Chemistry as well, I'd recommend the George Facer (who's chief examiner) textbook rather than the official Edexcel one.
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    There isn't an 'official' one.
    All OCR textbooks are just accredited to say they cover the syllabus.

    The best source of 'official' definitions is to go through all the examiner's reports.
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    That's kind of strange, I'd expect the school to have its own textbooks, especially for A level (obviously the need for resources is less so for GCSE and below, but for A level?) - what happens if someone can't buy one - Wouldn't that just be really awkward for everyone?

    Yes, I'm taking A level Physics (I did AS this June). Obviously if you need to buy one, the best one is just the official OCR one, which is on Amazon. Though if you're doing Chemistry as well, I'd recommend the George Facer (who's chief examiner) textbook rather than the official Edexcel one.
    I'm sure they must have got some text books around somewhere!

    Is physics really hard at a level? I heard that so many people get terrible grades and oh boy no way I would never do chemistry at A level! I'll have to look on amazon :-)


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    (Original post by teachercol)
    There isn't an 'official' one.
    All OCR textbooks are just accredited to say they cover the syllabus.

    The best source of 'official' definitions is to go through all the examiner's reports.
    Okay, I will have a look, thank you :-)


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    (Original post by lilypear)
    I'm sure they must have got some text books around somewhere!

    Is physics really hard at a level? I heard that so many people get terrible grades and oh boy no way I would never do chemistry at A level! I'll have to look on amazon :-)


    No...No...
    I didn't really find physics hard at AS, can't say what it's like for A2 obviously - the workload is fairly reasonable (I spent the least amount of time on h/w tasks and revision stuff compared to Maths, Chemistry, Latin & English Literature).

    For instance there are 12 topics in the Mechanics Module (there are two modules in total); The materials topic is basically just those definitions you were asked to get + the equations F=kx (from GCSE) & Elastic Potential Energy = 1/2 Fx. That's it - pretty much an entire topic!

    And I'd say about half of the syllabus is just a repeat of GCSE ideas. You don't get that kind of overlap in other subjects. I'd say the reason a lot of people do badly at Physics AS is because the actual syllabus is so straightforward - the hardest level of maths you'll do is y = mx +c at AS, and at A2 making the jump from y = a^x to log(y) = x log(a) (you'll cover logs in maths AS) - so because of this the examiners try to set tricky questions, and if you don't bother to do enough practice papers and questions to be confident at the theory, you'll end up making a lot of slip ups; i.e. this year we had to do a standard young's modulus calculation (based on the equation from it's definition), but the graph we were given was in %, so a lot of people got answers that were a factor of 10^2 out of the actual one cause they didn't stop and think about what they were doing.

    Just be bothered to do h/w questions yourself (it is very easy to just copy someones answer in physics, unlike in english where you can't coast through the year) - posting on the TSR for someone about your h/w before you've struggled with a problem for a bit (before you've even started physics a level!) perhaps is an example of this issue - and learn your definitions properly (like the materials ones), and it becomes quite a lot easier.
 
 
 
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