How many years will student finance fund me for?

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ChemEng
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So i didn't get the grades to study chemical engineering at the university i wanted to go to and instead they offered me a foundation program with progression onto the chemical engineering course. I want to leave university with a MEng and that means i will be in university for a minimum of 5 years (6 years if i choose to do a placement year).
So my question is will student finance fund the course for the whole 5-6 years?
My friends tell me SFE only fund for a maximum on 4 years.
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Stanners95
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(Original post by ChemEng)
So i didn't get the grades to study chemical engineering at the university i wanted to go to and instead they offered me a foundation program with progression onto the chemical engineering course. I want to leave university with a MEng and that means i will be in university for a minimum of 5 years (6 years if i choose to do a placement year).
So my question is will student finance fund the course for the whole 5-6 years?
My friends tell me SFE only fund for a maximum on 4 years.
I think student finance will fund the entirety of your programme, although I'm not entirely sure... your best bet is to check the student finance website. Sorry i can't be more help
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ChemEng
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(Original post by Stanners95)
I think student finance will fund the entirety of your programme, although I'm not entirely sure... your best bet is to check the student finance website. Sorry i can't be more help
Thank you for your reply anyway
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moggington
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If there is an institution that covers you all the way through as one straight course, then yes, student finance should fund the entirety of your progamme, but it's probably best to check with individual universities/courses on this.
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jelly1000
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[QUOTE=ChemEng;44282675]So i didn't get the grades to study chemical engineering at the university i wanted to go to and instead they offered me a foundation program with progression onto the chemical engineering course. I want to leave university with a MEng and that means i will be in university for a minimum of 5 years (6 years if i choose to do a placement year).
So my question is will student finance fund the course for the whole 5-6 years?
My friends tell me SFE only fund for a maximum on 4 years.[/QUOTE]

thats a common misconception. the rule is that student finance will fund the length of the course + 1 year- any years already studied. it does mean for most people on 3 year courses they have 4 years worth of funding but obviously for those on longer courses they have more.

you should be fine for funding for the whole course.
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Bonoculars
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Well it is something that you will have to worry about considering you did not work hard enough during exam time and subsequently failed.

If you attend Bolton however they will provide a subsidy on the tuition fees.

This will mean that you will rely on student finance less
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Knalchemist
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(Original post by ChemEng)
So i didn't get the grades to study chemical engineering at the university i wanted to go to and instead they offered me a foundation program with progression onto the chemical engineering course. I want to leave university with a MEng and that means i will be in university for a minimum of 5 years (6 years if i choose to do a placement year).
So my question is will student finance fund the course for the whole 5-6 years?
My friends tell me SFE only fund for a maximum on 4 years.
Student Finance fund you for the length of your course + 1 year.

So if your course is 5 years, you'll get 5 years funding + 1 extra year for a re-sit year.
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kumori
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If the MEng is one course they should fund it all (+ foundation). However since they don't fund masters they won't do a undergraduate then a masters. That is what I've been told however.

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kami
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(Original post by Knalchemist)
Student Finance fund you for the length of your course + 1 year.

So if your course is 5 years, you'll get 5 years funding + 1 extra year for a re-sit year.
That sounds great but is it available for EU students
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River85
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(Original post by jelly1000)
Thats a common misconception. the rule is that student finance will fund the length of the course + 1 year- any years already studied. it does mean for most people on 3 year courses they have 4 years worth of funding but obviously for those on longer courses they have more.

you should be fine for funding for the whole course.
It always amuses me when people do insist a student can receive funding for only four years. How do they think medics cope for five or six years?
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kami
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I know but I am not quite sure is that rule is available for non-UK even if you are EU student
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Knalchemist
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(Original post by kami)
I know but I am not quite sure is that rule is available for non-UK even if you are EU student
It is one rule for all students.

However, don't forget that if you're an EU student going to English university, and you haven't lived in the UK for 3 years that you'll only receive a tuition fee loan, and no maintenance.
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TheStudent.
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(Original post by River85)
It always amuses me when people do insist a student can receive funding for only four years. How do they think medics cope for five or six years?
Student finance only funds the first four years of a medical degree. The NHS covers the rest.
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River85
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(Original post by TheStudent.)
Student finance only funds the first four years of a medical degree. The NHS covers the rest.
I was not referring specifically to support from funding bodies, but finance in general, I should have made that clearer.

I was also referring to intercalated years, which I believe are covered by funding bodies (assuming the student has the additional year of funding free)? A students' first four years are covered by the funding body, and final two by the NHS.

Either way, bad example. What I mean to say is that enough funding will always be available in order to allow someone to complete a degree, certainly in typical cases. People won't be "cut short" of funding, unless they've had previous study. So the rule is always the length of course minus previous years.

Even those who have used up previous years for medical or personal reasons, concessions can be made. I used up six years of funding for my undergraduate degree, a 3 year BA. But I stress this was only due to being granted compelling personal reasons for two years.
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TheStudent.
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(Original post by River85)
I was not referring specifically to support from funding bodies, but finance in general, I should have made that clearer.

I was also referring to intercalated years, which I believe are covered by funding bodies (assuming the student has the additional year of funding free)? A students' first four years are covered by the funding body, and final two by the NHS.

Either way, bad example. What I mean to say is that enough funding will always be available in order to allow someone to complete a degree, certainly in typical cases. People won't be "cut short" of funding, unless they've had previous study. So the rule is always the length of course minus previous years.

Even those who have used up previous years for medical or personal reasons, concessions can be made. I used up six years of funding for my undergraduate degree, a 3 year BA. But I stress this was only due to being granted compelling personal reasons for two years.
As far as im aware, an intercalated year counts towards one of the four years of funding student finance will provide. The NHS completely takes over in the fifth year of study.

Yup exactly
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Knalchemist
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(Original post by River85)
I was not referring specifically to support from funding bodies, but finance in general, I should have made that clearer.

I was also referring to intercalated years, which I believe are covered by funding bodies (assuming the student has the additional year of funding free)? A students' first four years are covered by the funding body, and final two by the NHS.

Either way, bad example. What I mean to say is that enough funding will always be available in order to allow someone to complete a degree, certainly in typical cases. People won't be "cut short" of funding, unless they've had previous study. So the rule is always the length of course minus previous years.

Even those who have used up previous years for medical or personal reasons, concessions can be made. I used up six years of funding for my undergraduate degree, a 3 year BA. But I stress this was only due to being granted compelling personal reasons for two years.
I am just curious, were you able to apply for CPR for those two years in one go, or did you have to apply for them over separate years?
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ntailor147
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where can I get this information from on student finance website???
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Tiger Rag
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#18
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(Original post by ntailor147)
where can I get this information from on student finance website???
Hi, this is a pretty old thread. You'll get more answers if you start your own thread. Going to close this one now.
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