anony.mouse
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#1
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Is anyone taking a safe to uni?

BTW I'm not in halls.

I don't mean a 1tonne, 5 inch thick steel safe, but a little one that can be secured to the bed etc for keeping money, passport, driving licence, bank cards in etc. My dad wanted me to have it to stop opportunistic thieves. They would take anything laying around but wouldn't bother dismantling a bed to get a little box off, when they don't even know what it contains. The way he goes on about it and not walking round the streets at night, you'd think I was going to the east end of london !

My dad has bought me one for £10 from aldi/lidl (i'm always getting the two mixed up), but I think aldi. With a cable that can be used to tie it round a bed etc. He was going to get one and screw it to the bottom of the wardrobe ! I tried telling him that the landlord would probably not allow such a thing and he wouldn't believe me until I asked my brother who lets a property who said he wouldn't allow his tenants do it.
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Swanbow
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Parents get worried. So long as you keep your doors and windows locked whenever you aren't in I don't really see the necessity for it. I mean it can't hurt, but personally I think your father is just worrying a bit too much.
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anony.mouse
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(Original post by Swanbow)
Parents get worried. So long as you keep your doors and windows locked whenever you aren't in I don't really see the necessity for it. I mean it can't hurt, but personally I think your father is just worrying a bit too much.
When I told him 2 of my lectures will be finishing at 6, he told me to get a taxi home and not walk home in the dark !!! I'll be 20 the weekend I move in !!!
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Clip
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To be effective, a safe has to be screwed to a joist or fixed to a supporting wall with bolts or chemical bonding. Without this, it's nothing but a very large cash box.

If you are concerned about burglary, you need a properly installed safe.

If you are concerned about your flatmates casually going through your stuff, you don't need a safe, you need new flatmates.
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Swanbow
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(Original post by anony.mouse)
When I told him 2 of my lectures will be finishing at 6, he told me to get a taxi home and not walk home in the dark !!! I'll be 20 the weekend I move in !!!
Where are you going to university, Mogadishu? That is pretty excessive :lol:
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ManifoldManifest
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A safe seems a little like overkill. If you aren't leaving your windows/door open or unlocked when you're out then opportunistic thieves are pretty unlikely.

Your dad just sounds a bit worried. Are you the first one in the family to go away for uni? Parents worry about that kind of thing. Take the safe to make him happy, even if there's no need to use it. Tell him you're being safe, it doesn't cost much and sets his mind at ease. Then do what you like.

(Also, the East End of London is a lovely place, I've happily walked around there after dark plenty of times.)
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LouiseOrd
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If you keep your windows and doors locked when you leave, you SHOULD be covered by your university hall's insurance policy (I know Exeter do it, and I assume it's a normal thing) but Endsleigh offer basic cover against flood, fire and theft providing someone actually broke in (I.e you didn't go out leaving your door unlocked).

Unless you're going into a private house, in which case you'll need to talk to your landlord about whether you're insured.


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anony.mouse
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(Original post by Clip)
To be effective, a safe has to be screwed to a joist or fixed to a supporting wall with bolts or chemical bonding. Without this, it's nothing but a very large cash box.

If you are concerned about burglary, you need a properly installed safe.

If you are concerned about your flatmates casually going through your stuff, you don't need a safe, you need new flatmates.
It has a 80cm steel cable to secure it to a bed or pipe etc.

(Original post by Swanbow)
Where are you going to university, Mogadishu? That is pretty excessive :lol:
Portsmouth !!!

(Original post by ManifoldManifest)
A safe seems a little like overkill. If you aren't leaving your windows/door open or unlocked when you're out then opportunistic thieves are pretty unlikely.

Your dad just sounds a bit worried. Are you the first one in the family to go away for uni? Parents worry about that kind of thing. Take the safe to make him happy, even if there's no need to use it. Tell him you're being safe, it doesn't cost much and sets his mind at ease. Then do what you like.

(Also, the East End of London is a lovely place, I've happily walked around there after dark plenty of times.)
I wouldn't leave windows/doors open, but my housemates might !!! - according to him anyway ...

I have 3 brothers and sisters, all are a lot older than me and all have moved out, but none of them went to uni.
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anony.mouse
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(Original post by LouiseOrd)
If you keep your windows and doors locked when you leave, you SHOULD be covered by your university hall's insurance policy (I know Exeter do it, and I assume it's a normal thing) but Endsleigh offer basic cover against flood, fire and theft providing someone actually broke in (I.e you didn't go out leaving your door unlocked).

Unless you're going into a private house, in which case you'll need to talk to your landlord about whether you're insured.


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I'm not in halls ... I'm in what my dad thinks is going to be a rough part of town !
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returnmigrant
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You dont need a safe.

As stated above, if you make sure you keep all the stuff like passports etc in a sensible place out of sight, keep your room secure then it wont be an issue.

What most opportunistic thieves are far more interested in is things like Ipods, phones, laptops & PCs etc, not your passport. So, keep stuff like this out of clear view when you go out (close the curtains) and make sure windows/doors are locked.

Take the cash box if it shuts your Dad up. But frankly anything for £10 is going to be a piece of cake to bust open and in many ways it just advertises where you keep your valuables. Stick it under the bed and forget about it. And catch the bus home - there are better things to spend your student finance on than 6pm taxis.
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Origami Bullets
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By taking a safe, all you're doing is making it really bloody obvious to anyone who does burgle you where your valuables are.

Small safes are very easy to pick up and run off with, so that they can take a sledgehammer to it later. But to be honest with you any £10 safe can probably be opened using a dinner knife (or, at most, a crowbar). Any burglar worth their salt will have a set of bolt cutters, so the cable will be gone in seconds.

Security through obscurity, as my dad says. You're best off hiding your passport etc around your room, so that they have to be spending valuable time to look for anything like that. Chances are they won't bother - thieves who break into student houses are normally just after consumer electronics, as they know that there are 7 laptops, 7 smartphones, 7 iPods etc per student house, which is much more than a family house.

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GeekyNick
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My brother took a small fire-proof document safe like this one to uni http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sentry-Safe-...tp_s2_edpp_url

It was primarily for fire protection but it locked and was very sturdy so it offered a degree and of security. You would have to chain in to something though otherwise someone could waltz out with the whole thing

I'll probably take one for the fire protection - I will be insured but I'd rather not lose my passport, birth certificate etc all at once. As far as I see it though my university room needs to be secure - if I don't feel safe to leave valuables there I certainty wouldn't want to sleep in there! On that basis I don't see the point of a safe solely for security purposes.

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Egg Fried Rice
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Not needed. Plus you dont want to be the kid that is seen carrying a safe into university on the first day.
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returnmigrant
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PS. In private rentals - change the lock on your door when you move in (you can change the barrel of a Yale lock without having to completely re-install the entire lock) as you never know exactly who still has a key. You need to hang on to the old barrel and simply put this back in the lock when you move out.
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Moura
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not really a good idea... robber comes into your room... what does he try taking? the small safe he can use his tools to unattach or does he spend ages looking for stuff around your room? he'll take the easy option. a good idea would be to take a safe but not put one but have nothing in it except some weighted stuff to make it seem its full, then hide your important stuff elsewhere. for example if you're really paranoid, passport in an empty DVD case.
small safes are easy to remove and the kind of robber who breaks into homes probably aren't beginners. its just like putting up a sign saying "here are my valuables!!"
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Inazuma
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I've bought one like you described actually :P
I'd lose my passport if I tried to hide it. I was just going to keep the box attached to something out of sight for stuff..
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anony.mouse
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(Original post by marinaim)
I've bought one like you described actually :P
I'd lose my passport if I tried to hide it. I was just going to keep the box attached to something out of sight for stuff..
I'm glad I'm not the only one. There aren't many places to hide things in my room anyway.
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Ripper-Roo
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(Original post by Egg Fried Rice)
Not needed. Plus you dont want to be the kid that is seen carrying a safe into university on the first day.
Why? :erm: It's personal safety, it's nobody else's business what makes you feel secure. And nobody inspects the stuff you bring into your accommodation. :laugh:
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anony.mouse
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(Original post by Egg Fried Rice)
Not needed. Plus you dont want to be the kid that is seen carrying a safe into university on the first day.
(Original post by Ripper-Roo)
Why? :erm: It's personal safety, it's nobody else's business what makes you feel secure. And nobody inspects the stuff you bring into your accommodation. :laugh:
I won't be walking into uni with it. I'm not in halls and i told intend on carrying it wherever I go. And out of the people i'll be living with, i'm probably going to be the first one arriving.
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blackrose1234567
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I live in the east end of London, it's actually quite safe here.
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