Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I managed to get to A2 without properly understanding what it was and I think its time for me to learn.

    Specifically internal and external.

    Thanks for answering what may be a very dumb question.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there,

    While you're waiting for an answer, did you know we have 300,000 study resources that could answer your question in TSR's Learn together section?

    We have everything from Teacher Marked Essays to Mindmaps and Quizzes to help you with your work. Take a look around.

    If you're stuck on how to get started, try creating some resources. It's free to do and can help breakdown tough topics into manageable chunks. Get creating now.

    Thanks!

    Not sure what all of this is about? Head here to find out more.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IllmaticDragon)
    I managed to get to A2 without properly understanding what it was and I think its time for me to learn.

    Specifically internal and external.

    Thanks for answering what may be a very dumb question.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hello
    Okay so reliability is the idea that if you were to repeat your experiment then you would achieve similar results.

    When I did my A Level in Psychology I found http://www.holah.co.uk/page/validity/ this helpful It's got internal and external explained for you there

    Hope this helps!
    S
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by sophie27891)
    Hello
    Okay so reliability is the idea that if you were to repeat your experiment then you would achieve similar results.

    When I did my A Level in Psychology I found http://www.holah.co.uk/page/validity/ this helpful It's got internal and external explained for you there

    Hope this helps!
    S
    Ideally, you are aiming to replicate your results exactly, not just similarly. It shows that your methods are free from error and that other researchers are more likely to trust the findings.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    If it's an experiment then it's whether controls are put in place which only manipulate the variable you wish to chance and control all extraneous (other) variables. This type of experiment is usually in a laboratory setting. It means you should be able to replicate your experiment to get similar findings and establish cause and effect
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by saraw26)
    If it's an experiment then it's whether controls are put in place which only manipulate the variable you wish to chance and control all extraneous (other) variables. This type of experiment is usually in a laboratory setting. It means you should be able to replicate your experiment to get similar findings and establish cause and effect
    Controls are always put in place, this has nothing to do with reliability. Reliability just describes your ability to obtain consistent results.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dillio)
    Controls are always put in place, this has nothing to do with reliability. Reliability just describes your ability to obtain consistent results.
    Yes, but to obtain consistent results you need to control these extraneous variables. Hence why a lab setting generally gives you more reliable results.

    It's one of the first things you learn in psychology...
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    You mean one of the first things you learn at A-Level Psychology? Are you saying that you are worse at controlling for confounding variables in a non-laboratory setting?

    Your experiment will always be as reliable as it can be so long as your methods are genuine and carefully applied, regardless of the setting.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Yes, at A level Psychology.

    Well if it is in a field or natural setting, there are unexpected extraneous/confounding variables which can affect reliability of the results. For example if they are testing how well a student does in a test after listening to music; in a field or natural setting there could be interruptions and other variables which then affect the reliability of the results. Therefore to obtain more reliable results, more controls are needed and hence the use of a lab setting.

    I think your definition is the general one for all reliability in all subjects. Whereas mine is applied to experiments and studies - as that is what is mainly what they ask you in Psychology.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by saraw26)
    Yes, at A level Psychology.

    Well if it is in a field or natural setting, there are unexpected extraneous/confounding variables which can affect reliability of the results.


    You can have unexpected confounding variables in any setting, even a lab setting.

    For example if they are testing how well a student does in a test after listening to music; in a field or natural setting there could be interruptions and other variables which then affect the reliability of the results.

    No, it would affect the validity of the results, not the reliability. If all the participants were interrupted during the test, then it would still be reliable. Also, interruptions can take place in a lab setting as well; imaging two people having a noisy conversation next to the lab, for instance.

    Therefore to obtain more reliable results, more controls are needed and hence the use of a lab setting.

    You are implying that a laboratory setting is the only place in which reliable results can be obtained. I think you are getting validity and reliability confused. Remember, results can be highly reliable, but still invalid, but the other way round can not be said.

    I think your definition is the general one for all reliability in all subjects. Whereas mine is applied to experiments and studies - as that is what is mainly what they ask you in Psychology.
    You can have unexpected confounding variables in any setting, even a lab setting.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dillio)
    You can have unexpected confounding variables in any setting, even a lab setting.
    Yes I know that. What I'm saying is that GENERALLY a lab setting is more reliable :P
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by saraw26)
    Yes, but to obtain consistent results you need to control these extraneous variables. Hence why a lab setting generally gives you more reliable results.

    It's one of the first things you learn in psychology...
    To try and clear up the apparent confusion
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by saraw26)
    Yes I know that. What I'm saying is that GENERALLY a lab setting is more reliable :P
    No, what you are saying is that generally, a lab setting is more valid than a field setting.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Validly is completely different. In fact natural settings are mostly way more valid than labs. With natural being way more ecologically valid etc.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Hahaha I was feeling kinda dumb for not knowing, but it seems at least one other person here is in the same boat.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I know now its basically just consistency but not about int and ext.
    oh well thx


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    How consistent a measuring device is


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: September 13, 2013

2,627

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.