Residency status - British citizen studying abroad

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Dominiku95
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Hey everybody,

I've just started a 4-year degree programme at a university outside the UK/EU. I'm not sure about my plans for after that, but I'm wondering what my fee status would be if I wanted to study for a Masters degree in the UK after my undergraduate study abroad. (The universities I've looked at have much higher international fee rates) Here's a little information:

- I'll be outside the UK and the EU/EEA for four years studying.
- I'm a British citizen, and lived in the UK for 18 years (from birth until just 10 days ago).
- I will probably return to the UK for two months of each year (July and August) during which I will live in the same place of residence as before (i.e., home with parents).
- I have a UK bank account and National Insurance Number.

I hope someone can help me out. The information I've found online has been really ambiguous so far, and my situation is pretty specific.

Thank you for reading.
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balotelli12
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I think you will be considered an international for fees.
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Klix88
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To be considered for UK resident fees, you generally need to have been "ordinarily resident" in the UK for three years prior to the start of a course. It doesn't seem that this is the case for the scenario you describe. Your nationality, citizenship and place of residence before the three year period, won't be taken into consideration. A two month period at home each year probably won't help.

However in the case of a Masters there's no central funding available, so each university can potentially set their own criteria for "ordinarily resident". To be sure of your fee position, you'd have to contact each of your prospective unis in advance of applying, to check your specific circumstances.
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Dominiku95
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There doesn't seem to be any fixed definition of "ordinarily resident," but HMRC list some examples of "relevant factors" in determining whether somebody is no longer ordinarily resident. Obviously this is more for tax purposes, but it's the best explanation of ordinary residency I've seen yet.

Among the points it makes are:

"Visits to see family who have remained at the person’s home in the United Kingdom or holidays spent at such a retained home in the United Kingdom may indicate continued ordinary residence." I'd most likely be returning home to visit family for 2 months each year.

"Will the person be returning to the United Kingdom? If so, this may indicate that ordinary residence continues during the period(s) abroad..." I'm not decided on whether I'd want to stay abroad or not, but since my purpose of going abroad is to study (on a student visa) for a fixed period (I'm set to graduate in '17), then unless I actively pursue further study or work here I would, by default, return to the UK after I've finished my degree.

"Will the person be returning to the United Kingdom at the end of the period abroad? If so, this may indicate that ordinary residence continues." I'm not planning on moving to any other foreign country after my study here, so I'm either staying put here (which because of visas would necessarily require that I either find work or a Masters programme in Japan, making the question of UK fees redundant) or return home to the UK.

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/manuals/cbtmanual/cbtm10020.htm
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balotelli12
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Clutching at straws I'm afraid.
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Dominiku95
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Cambridge's website is a little clearer.

"Being absent from the UK/EEA due to study abroad is usually considered a 'temporary absence' and does not affect 'ordinary residence' if the home/permanent address is within the UK/EEA."

https://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students...ts/status.html
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balotelli12
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Cambridge it is then!
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Dominiku95
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Well, maybe Cambridge is a little too optimistic but in any case, I'm glad that my options appear to be fairly open.
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balotelli12
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As already explained every UNI has total freedom in defining terms at post grad level. If I were you I'd be asking the unis you fancy how they define it and hope they don't change their minds in the next 3 years.
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returnmigrant
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What country overseas? What visa are you using to study overseas - a student visa or do you have dual-nationality, emigration status or residency for that country?

Are you still dependent on your parents - are they paying your fees, and where are they living whilst you are overseas?
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Dominiku95
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I'm studying in Japan for four academic years. I'm on a Japanese student visa, which lasts for 2 years 3 months and will need to be renewed to cover the remainder of the 4 years. I have a Japanese residency card which is issued to all people whose status of residence allows for more than 90 days stay (so students at my university on 1 year study abroad programmes from UK universities were also issued with them) but I do not have either Japanese nationality or permanent resident status.

I am still dependent on my parents, who have already paid the full first year's fees. I have a scholarship from the university, but this does not fully cover fees, let alone living costs, so I am still dependent on my parents income. They are both living in the family home.
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returnmigrant
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This suggests that you are still 'normally domiciled' in the UK. BUT every University can and does make different decisions on this. This info sheet from Sheffield has a useful explanation of the basics on this issue http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/polopoly_...sFeeStatus.pdf and includes mention of students temporarily resident overseas for employment purposes - I suspect your study in Japan might be viewed in this light.

It might be worth you emailing a couple of Postgrad admissions offices and asking about this. Some might tell you they wont give you this sort of answer unless you actually apply but its worth a try.
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Dominiku95
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Thank you for the link. Obviously it's a little early to be thinking about (post)graduate studies, but I was anxious to know whether my current studies would affect potential future study fees/funding. I'll most likely revisit the topic when I do look at post-graduation plans, and I'm probably not at any risk of under thinking it.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by Dominiku95)
Thank you for the link. Obviously it's a little early to be thinking about (post)graduate studies, but I was anxious to know whether my current studies would affect potential future study fees/funding. I'll most likely revisit the topic when I do look at post-graduation plans, and I'm probably not at any risk of under thinking it.
remember there is little funding for postgraduate courses in the UK
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Dominiku95
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Well, it's not so much a case of funding as it is of fees. One of the Masters courses I was looking at cost just over £6,000 for home/EU students but around £15,000 for international students. My family could probably afford the former, but the latter would be more difficult.

I've been told that getting a Masters would be important for finding work outside Japan, because although my university is considered one of the most elite (and hardest) in Japan, it's not particular well known outside Japan (where Japanese universities tend to be looked down upon). It does, however, has exchange links with a lot of prestigious universities in the US and UK, including the universities I'm looking at, which I'm hoping might work in my favour (especially if I study for a Masters in Japanese Studies, for example).
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jelly1000
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(Original post by Dominiku95)
Well, it's not so much a case of funding as it is of fees. One of the Masters courses I was looking at cost just over £6,000 for home/EU students but around £15,000 for international students. My family could probably afford the former, but the latter would be more difficult.

I've been told that getting a Masters would be important for finding work outside Japan, because although my university is considered one of the most elite (and hardest) in Japan, it's not particular well known outside Japan (where Japanese universities tend to be looked down upon). It does, however, has exchange links with a lot of prestigious universities in the US and UK, including the universities I'm looking at, which I'm hoping might work in my favour (especially if I study for a Masters in Japanese Studies, for example).
thats fine then, just wanted to make sure you were aware
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gioprete79
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Hello, I am a student applying for funding for the 2015/2016 academic year. I am a new student just accepted at Leeds uni. I fulfill all the requirements for EU status, but there is one implication that you need to help me a bit.

So my story is:
I am a EU National, born and lived in a EU country all my life, went to school there, worked, have a bank account and my family lives there as well. I hold dual citizenship, Greek and Canadian which I got from my grandparents who lived in Canada for a while.
For the past three years, starting 2012 I lived in Greece, however, in August 2014 I moved for 8 months in Canada to pursue studies at a university, in order to determine what I wanted to with my life. They offered a good program, like a foundation year, and this way I had the ability to develop my interests in various departments. However I was accepted at a full four years BA program and then withdrew, since my intentions from the first place was to stay only for 8 months and then pursue my degree in the EU. I returned in the EU in April right after 8 months.
Despite having being accepted into a four year program, I have a letter from an academic ad visor, that says that my intentions were to stay only for 8 months and a letter from a professor of the same content.

Will I be classified as an overseas student because of that? AND will I still be entitled to a loan?
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