Do employers look at your A-level results if you have a degree? Watch

bloomblaze
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simple question, if you have a university degree, do employers just look at your degree or do they look at your a-levels (and gcses...) also ?


what im getting at here is : how important are a-level grades?


EDIT:
eg say someone screwed up a-levels and had to repeat them a few times, but then did well at a decent university, how would this affect them?
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LukeyJB
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Not really... your performance at degree level far outweighs that at A-level as your degree is a better indicator of how you can perform in that area of work, or academia. A-levels might be used to distinguish between two candidates if an employer was stuck due to the fact that both candidates had equal degrees, it varies from employer to employer; there's no definitive answer - but generally, no.
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zaback21
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(Original post by bloomblaze)
simple question, if you have a university degree, do employers just look at your degree or do they look at your a-levels (and gcses...) also ?


what im getting at here is : hoe important are a-level grades?
99.99% of the time, its not at all important. Even employers don't bother with undergraduate results.They just wanna know if you have a degree or not. Its all about how good you did in your last job, that's what matters. Nobody cares if you got 1st class in your undergraduate once you get into a job.
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Cutmeloose
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(Original post by zaback21)
99.99% of the time, its not at all important. Even employers don't bother with undergraduate results.They just wanna know if you have a degree or not. Its all about how good you did in your last job, that's what matters. Nobody cares if you got 1st class in your undergraduate once you get into a job.
So much fail in this post. Last part is half-correct. But for lots of people getting that first job is the issue.

If you want to make it rain, then you generally need 'good' A-Levels (BBB-AAB+
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Kre
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It depends really. In accountancy, the profession I'm pursuing, there are almost certainly UCAS point requirements, as well as a standard 2:1 degree. These vary from company, but most ask for at least 300-320 UCAS points (ABB-BBB)

(Original post by zaback21)
99.99% of the time, its not at all important. Even employers don't bother with undergraduate results.They just wanna know if you have a degree or not. Its all about how good you did in your last job, that's what matters. Nobody cares if you got 1st class in your undergraduate once you get into a job.
Plucking statistics out of thin air, are we? A-Levels are important and depending on the profession, poor performance can and will hinder the chance of employment, regardless of your degree. Careers in law, accountancy, investment banking, finance etc. require good A-Levels since companies look at these.
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LukeyJB
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(Original post by Kre)
It depends really. In accountancy, the profession I'm pursuing, there are almost certainly UCAS point requirements, as well as a standard 2:1 degree. These vary from company, but most ask for at least 300-320 UCAS points (ABB-BBB)



Plucking statistics out of thin air, are we? A-Levels are important and depending on the profession, poor performance can and will hinder the chance of employment, regardless of your degree. Careers in law, accountancy, investment banking, finance etc. require good A-Levels since companies look at these.
Very few law firms give a rats arse about your A-levels, your degree classification and experience are much more important; I excel in law and other essay based subjects, but I completely flunked by A-level biology, so why would that prevent me getting a pupillage? Perhaps at your top law firms, but not in most places. I have spoken to many law academics and barristers on this matter and it really varies by firm to firm, some take A-levels into account, some don't even ask for them. Some are uptight about your alma mater, some don't care; most of the time they want you to have a great undergraduate degree and work experience, plus any postgraduate study at a top university can also help immensely.
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M1011
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(Original post by LukeyJB)
Very few law firms give a rats arse about your A-levels, your degree classification and experience are much more important; I excel in law and other essay based subjects, but I completely flunked by A-level biology, so why would that prevent me getting a pupillage? Perhaps at your top law firms, but not in most places. I have spoken to many law academics and barristers on this matter and it really varies by firm to firm, some take A-levels into account, some don't even ask for them. Some are uptight about your alma mater, some don't care; most of the time they want you to have a great undergraduate degree and work experience, plus any postgraduate study at a top university can also help immensely.
The point is that many top employers from many sectors have a UCAS tariff to apply, therefore it evidently is important! Not applying to every place doesn't chamge that.
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River85
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(Original post by bloomblaze)
simple question, if you have a university degree, do employers just look at your degree or do they look at your a-levels (and gcses...) also ?


what im getting at here is : how important are a-level grades?


EDIT:
eg say someone screwed up a-levels and had to repeat them a few times, but then did well at a decent university, how would this affect them?
Employment, even graduate employment, is far too broad to give a straight yes or no. What is certainly true is that several graduate schemes do have A-level filters alongside a degree classification requirement. It will usually be 300 to 340 UCAS points. Sometimes it might be stressed that this needs to be achieved as a first sitting.

Even employers who don't operate such a tariff may still take A-level results into account as part of a wider application. It really will differ according to employer.

As for your question, I suspect this is something most on here can't answer as few are employers. However, I'd say it depends on the reasons why the person "screwed" up A-levels (illness, for example) and what they did during the times they were re-sitting their A-levels (employment?). What is obvious is that someone who kept messing up their A-levels needing to re-sit them, will ultimately be a mature student once they begin university. So they will be in, say, their mid to late 20s when they graduate? Certain employers will therefore expect to see a more substantial work history than a 21 year old can provide.

(Original post by zaback21)
99.99% of the time, its not at all important. Even employers don't bother with undergraduate results.They just wanna know if you have a degree or not. Its all about how good you did in your last job, that's what matters. Nobody cares if you got 1st class in your undergraduate once you get into a job.
Well, most certainly care if you got a 2:1/1st or a 2:2/below, so it's not just a cause of "having a degree". Some graduate schemes will accept 2:2s, even some of the most competitive such as the Civil Service Fast Stream for example, but thirds and ordinary degrees won't be accepted without significant mitigating circumstances.

As for individual module results, some employers care. I know GlaxoSmithKline want every single undergraduate module and mark listed on an application. One assumes they ask this for a reason. I also know of several law firms who may also want to see an applicants' entire transcript as they want to a see consistent academic performance throughout a degree.

Admittedly this are very much in the minority. Most employers will only care about degree subject, degree classification and, sometimes, university attended.

(Original post by LukeyJB)
Not really... your performance at degree level far outweighs that at A-level as your degree is a better indicator of how you can perform in that area of work, or academia. A-levels might be used to distinguish between two candidates if an employer was stuck due to the fact that both candidates had equal degrees, it varies from employer to employer; there's no definitive answer - but generally, no.
I wager that it's rare A-levels would be used to chose between two identical candidates, simply because there will always be a way to differentiate between people (experience, personal qualities, how they interview). A-levels are more likely to be used as a filter.
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Kre
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(Original post by LukeyJB)
Very few law firms give a rats arse about your A-levels, your degree classification and experience are much more important; I excel in law and other essay based subjects, but I completely flunked by A-level biology, so why would that prevent me getting a pupillage? Perhaps at your top law firms, but not in most places. I have spoken to many law academics and barristers on this matter and it really varies by firm to firm, some take A-levels into account, some don't even ask for them. Some are uptight about your alma mater, some don't care; most of the time they want you to have a great undergraduate degree and work experience, plus any postgraduate study at a top university can also help immensely.
Most of the magic circle firms have a minimum UCAS criteria, which is 340 points. This means a lot of people will get screened out in the application process, regardless of their degree.

If you want to aim low, then of course there are firms who don't care about your A-Levels. If you want to get into a decent/top firm, it is important.

All of the Big 4 accountancy firms require between 300-320 UCAS points too.

However, once you have your foot through the door, it doesn't matter so much.
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