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What is the difference between the English choices? watch

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    I'd really like to do English at sixth form but I don't know the differences between the options!

    Our options are: Lit, Lang and Lit/Lang, but I don't know which one to pick because I don't know what is involved for each one?

    Would anybody (preferably someone who has taken English) tell me what to expect from each one, thanks
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    English Literature - Analysing books, poems, etc
    English Language - Learning about sentence structure, comprehension, etc
    English Literature/Language - both


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    I took Lang/Lit. I regretted it for a long time because I'm doing Lit at uni and I'm quite a bit behind on many aspects of the course – poetry, theory, etc. I wouldn't recommend Lang unless you want to do a linguistics course or something, or unless you do Lit too. Lit is a great A Level and very well respected in and of itself, but very hard work. Lang/Lit is easier going and pretty interesting, plus you get more freedom to study what you want, but you might want to think about Lit more seriously if you're considering pursuing English beyond secondary school.
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    Thankyou both of you, this is all really interesting and useful. At the moment I am choosing between Lit/Lang and Lit, but I'm edging towards Lit/Lang as that's basically what you do at GCSE and I find the GCSE really interesting
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    I do both Lit and Lang at A2 level, the separate A-levels. It would honestly depend on what you prefer. I was more interested in lang, so I took that, and then I thought I might as well take lit. Turns out, I shall be applying for a language and literature degree!

    I think it's better (but harder) to do both separate A-levels. It's excellent in terms of you shall be getting in-depth knowledge and also you'll be getting breath skills too. Language A-level supports Literature really well and it goes hand-in-hand.

    Language you can expect it to be easier in terms of essay writing and so forth because all you really need to learn is all the frameworks and then applying that to an extract. When you study Language it's all broken down into small little segments; morphology, graphology, lexical, semantic, pragmatics, rhetorical and I think there's something else too but can't remember! And within these frameworks, there's loads and loads of terminologies and theories that you have to learn. So it's definitely more harder in terms of remembering stuff like key linguistics, researchers, theorists psychologists (for children language development). But it is soo much fun getting to use all these new fancy words and analysing texts. To be honest, at one stage (mainly revision for the exam) it does get a little bit tedious using the same words, terms over and over again but once you figure out where you can spot them and how it influences the text you will be analysing it gets way better!

    Lit is harder because there's no real way to teach or instruct a writing style to answer a question. Depending on which exam board (some exam boards have closed/open texts and prescribed/wider reading texts). Make sure you understand the texts you are reading, make sure you literally go over each chapter with always having a focus point such as narration, language, point of view, etc. Remember your quotes well - it's not good remembering them in the 1st term of your studies then trying to go over them again for exams (for me, remembering shorter things seems harder to remember). I think what makes literature hard is studying a text you don't enjoy, but if you can look past that and look at aspects of the texts you find of interest then you'll be fine. Oh, and make sure if you do have group/class discussions of key elements of your text, be sure to write down what other people say as it can be relevant and classed as an 'alternative interpretation'!

    If you want to challenge yourself, take the two; if you want to be a bit more tighter in your knowledge of English and explore different subjects, take the combined one. The choice is yours though!
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    (Original post by Cool_JordH)
    I do both Lit and Lang at A2 level, the separate A-levels. It would honestly depend on what you prefer. I was more interested in lang, so I took that, and then I thought I might as well take lit. Turns out, I shall be applying for a language and literature degree!

    I think it's better (but harder) to do both separate A-levels. It's excellent in terms of you shall be getting in-depth knowledge and also you'll be getting breath skills too. Language A-level supports Literature really well and it goes hand-in-hand.

    Language you can expect it to be easier in terms of essay writing and so forth because all you really need to learn is all the frameworks and then applying that to an extract. When you study Language it's all broken down into small little segments; morphology, graphology, lexical, semantic, pragmatics, rhetorical and I think there's something else too but can't remember! And within these frameworks, there's loads and loads of terminologies and theories that you have to learn. So it's definitely more harder in terms of remembering stuff like key linguistics, researchers, theorists psychologists (for children language development). But it is soo much fun getting to use all these new fancy words and analysing texts. To be honest, at one stage (mainly revision for the exam) it does get a little bit tedious using the same words, terms over and over again but once you figure out where you can spot them and how it influences the text you will be analysing it gets way better!

    Lit is harder because there's no real way to teach or instruct a writing style to answer a question. Depending on which exam board (some exam boards have closed/open texts and prescribed/wider reading texts). Make sure you understand the texts you are reading, make sure you literally go over each chapter with always having a focus point such as narration, language, point of view, etc. Remember your quotes well - it's not good remembering them in the 1st term of your studies then trying to go over them again for exams (for me, remembering shorter things seems harder to remember). I think what makes literature hard is studying a text you don't enjoy, but if you can look past that and look at aspects of the texts you find of interest then you'll be fine. Oh, and make sure if you do have group/class discussions of key elements of your text, be sure to write down what other people say as it can be relevant and classed as an 'alternative interpretation'!

    If you want to challenge yourself, take the two; if you want to be a bit more tighter in your knowledge of English and explore different subjects, take the combined one. The choice is yours though!
    This was incredibly useful, thankyou!
 
 
 
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