CELTA without a degree Watch

username321708
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Justpin
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You won't even get a look in. There are so many graduates with CELTAs and people who have work experience, that you will not be able to find a job, not even the really bottom end of the market.

Since the funding was slashed to 50 hours even colleges are cutting back on ESOL.

Plus your degree is your proof you can write at level 5.

Overseas again in Europe they'll want a graduate.

Outside Europe you will never get a visa anywhere therefore will be working as an illegal immigrant. Richard does this, he has to leave China every 2.5 months, his jobs also pay poorly and more than 4 tourist visas in a row in one year tends to get you denied. Plus teaching in China illegally isn't considered real teaching as it is assistant language teaching work.

I.e. all you do is focus on the pronunciation.
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username321708
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I guess going the CELTA route isn't worth doing then without a degree. Are there any other TEFL qualifications that would provide me with some skills that might be worth something?

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Justpin
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Not really, because while you can do PTTLS, again nobody will really hire you on this alone.

As PTTLS is a component of most of the PGCE/PGCE DTTLs qualifications.


HOWEVER, there are exemptions for some companies.

A few colleges (smaller ones) in Manchester for instance state if you do not have the official qualifications, but have 2000 hours of teaching experience within the past 2 years (i.e a full time job) they will hire you.

Problem is how to get the 2000 hours without the qualification in the first place. Even charities where I work don't have more than 9 hours a week.
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username321708
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(Original post by Justpin)
Not really, because while you can do PTTLS, again nobody will really hire you on this alone.

As PTTLS is a component of most of the PGCE/PGCE DTTLs qualifications.


HOWEVER, there are exemptions for some companies.

A few colleges (smaller ones) in Manchester for instance state if you do not have the official qualifications, but have 2000 hours of teaching experience within the past 2 years (i.e a full time job) they will hire you.

Problem is how to get the 2000 hours without the qualification in the first place. Even charities where I work don't have more than 9 hours a week.
Well I guess I will just have to find some way of making this happen. I'm not doing it for a quick buck, although I obviously have strong desires to travel and experience other cultures. I think I'll just take a TEFL qualification and try and get some experience, voluntary or otherwise. I'm starting at the bottom so I don't mind taking a crap post whilst you build yourself up. I may as well try.

I realise that a degree is required/preferred but the only thing I am passionate about is learning languages, and I'm of the opinion that a four year language degree would be a total waste of my time.
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YetAnotherMember
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I've just finished my CELTA and I don't have a degree.

I've looked at some jobs out there and there are a couple positions within Europe, where schools (and by schools, I mostly mean IH) don't require a degree, but they do ask for a good CELTA grade (Pass A or Pass B)

In Asia, again, it's possible (but not highly likely) to get a job without a degree, it's obviously not going to be the best job...But you're kind of restrcited to look for one within China (definitely wouldn't get into Japan, S. Korea, Thailand etc due to the visa requirements). I know some people (non-graduates) who are working in China and they're happy with their positions.

I think your best bet would be S. America, I haven't looked into it much myself, but some people told me they're relatively ''relaxed'' about not having a degree as long as you have a CELTA...The money isn't going to be as good as, say, Asia, but it's a start.

Good luck
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Greece_1988
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I don't have a university degree nor do I have previous teaching experience. I'm not a native English speaker (I'm from Greece) and the only qualifications I possess are my Senior High School Leaving Certificate (Grade:17,9/20), CPE (Grade: C), CELTA (Grade: A) and the International Diploma in IT Skills Poficiency (Full Certificate) by University of Cambridge International Examinations and Vellum Global Educational Services. Recently I got accepted by a Summer School in the UK to work as an EFL teacher. Hope everything goes well. I don't know.... :-(
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Greece_1988
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I don't have a university degree nor do I have previous teaching experience. I'm not a native English Speaker (I'm from Greece) and my only qualifications I possess are my Senior High School Leaving Certificate (Grade: 17,9/20), CPE (Grade C), CELTA (Grade A) and the International Diploma in IT Skills Proficiency by University of Cambridge International Examinations and Vellum Global Educational Services. Recently I got accepted by a Summer School in the UK to work there as an EFL teacher. Hope everything goes well. I don't know :-(
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The Champion.m4a
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CELTA is really basic. Not even a proper teaching qualification.
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Verst
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To make a career in ESL (which is incredibly difficult), I would recommend you get a degree first - probably in languages, rather than in English or linguistics. There are lots of language degrees in the UK you can do that don't focus on literary analysis etc. You can always get a job in TEFL without a degree, but you'd have much more chance abroad, especially in China. In the UK, you would need a degree and a good CELTA grade to get a permanent job, and even that is highly unlikely without a DELTA, which you can only get after 2 years' teaching experience.

Like any degree or qualification, it's what you make of it. I know people who have passed CELTA and know nothing about grammar, language or pedagogy. But I know others who are better teachers than people who have studied education at universities. In fact, some people who did study education at universities do very badly at CELTA. My own experience of it is that it won't give you the grammatical foundation you need to teach English, but in order to get a high pass you need to have acquired or otherwise osmosed the grammar elsewhere. I also have a friend who was a linguist and had a PGCE (i.e. both had lexical and pedagogical resources at hand) who only got the basic pass. But others with no teaching experience did very well. I am more positive about the practical side of CELTA - I think the teaching practice sessions are good - my trainers were extremely helpful.

People who do well at CELTA tend to be ones who listen to criticism and apply it. So even though it's a short course, I think it is capable of doing what it sets out to, provided (a) students come with a basic knowledge of the mechanics of language (don't have to be an expert) and (b) they welcome criticism.

Generally, careers in EFL are very hard to develop, as schools tend to hire on a needs-basis, so that means there's a lot of summer work, and not much in the winter. But it is a wonderful job. The pay is not great, it is one of the best jobs out there in terms of job satisfaction, in my opinion. And if you put your mind to it, you can make some money from it, e.g. by going into materials writing or assessment (but these would require a degree). Some countries - Japan springs to mind - will not hire people to teach English without a degree.

So in summary: you can take the CELTA without a degree and perhaps give summer teaching a go (there are tonnes of summer teaching jobs in the UK). But if you want to make a career out of it, I would say a degree is advisable.
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skharvey510
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I don't have a degree. I'm 20 years old and I'm currently teaching English in The Maldives with a private language centre. You're definitely right about it being a needs-basis. The job was advertised as needing a teacher immediately. I applied and about 2 or 3 days later we spoke in more detail, and I was offered the job. Flew out about a week later.

Before this I had 3 months teaching English in Italy with summer camps. My company was called BELL (Beyond English Language Learning) and I would recommend teaching in camps as a foot in the door to the ESL world.

But before this, when I was 19 years old, I was hired in Vietnam to teach English for 5 months. That's the only reason I was given the job here in Maldives- because I had experience both of teaching and of Asia in general (I had less chance of getting culture shock and better chance of adjusting to life here and therefore not leaving the contract early, I guess).

Therefore, it isn't true that you MUST have a degree. I haven't had trouble yet but that's because each time I went where the work was. I didn't first decide on a country then try and find a job. I found jobs advertised on eslworld and tefl.com among others. I think if you do it that way, don't be fussy and just go where the work is, you'll find as a native teacher you are incredibly desirable.

Since I'm "not educated", it puts me in a position where I take on anything other teachers tell me or advice and my manager too. Therefore I'm constantly learning, adapting and growing. I'm also more interested in taking qualifications that will better my knowledge of the English language and how to teach it. I've found qualifications such as the CELTA, although I can't take it in Maldives as there is no centre, but there is one in Sri Lanka. My bosses are considering giving me a month off in November as "Professional development" to go and do my CELTA. Other qualifications I've come across are the TKT (Teacher Knowledge Test) which also has some specialist tests you can take afterwards, for example in teaching young learners, also there is the ICELT (In-service certificate in English Language teaching) but you would take this, obviously as the name states, once you're in a teaching position.

Like the others have said after a Celta there is the possibility of a Delta, which I think is a Diploma in Teaching English.

Also, I might be wrong here but I think there are several master degree programs in teaching English as a foreign language and depending on your work experience, you MIGHT be able to get onto it without a BA degree. I'm only thinking this because a friend of mine worked in a bank for 4 years and was able to take an MA in Finance without a BA degree, so I am thinking perhaps it could be the same for English Teaching. I don't know though.

An important note is I am paid relatively less than the other teachers with degrees. Probably around $500 less a month. Something to consider.

Ooops, forgot to mention, I got my 140 hour TEFL with a company called I to I TEFL, you can find their website easily by typing the name into google. They are also where I found the job in Vietnam, they have a large jobs board with positions for all over. They also have a handy search filter that can search for jobs where a degree is not required.

Good luck! You won't know unless you try.
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giella
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You can get into TEFL without a degree but you may find that your lack of a degree shows when you're teaching. A lot of schools cater to graduates and business professionals and they expect a certain level from the people they're being taught by. You sound like you have a bit of an attitude already with regards to education to be honest. You don't value the things that a degree can teach in terms of cultural literacy in a language you and don't seem to value putting the work into things. That kind of attitude strikes me as possibly extending into other things as well although I do hope I'm wrong.

If you want a career in languages, you're going to need a degree. If you want to be competitive as an employee in another country, you're going to need a degree. It's becoming the basic level of qualification. TEFL is not really a great long-term career option. It can get you experiences and skills but if you don't have a degree, you're not going to progress. If you want to skip A levels and go straight to a degree you can do it through the OU and you could even do it abroad if you wanted to.

You could always study a language as an additional subject if you want to focus on the language side of things rather than the cultural.
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giella
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Consider a degree like this one even:

http://www.bangor.ac.uk/courses/unde...an-and-Spanish
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NPI
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One of my colleagues did a CELTA (without doing a degree first) then taught ESOL for 7 years and is now finishing a MA in English Language Teaching/Applied Linguistics at a Russell Group University (admitted on the basis of teaching experience, references and examples of written work).
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joenasia
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GOOD FOR YOU!!! Pay no mind to a pompass jackass such as
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ImAStudent123
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As an undergraduate with a CELTA, I have worked abroad in Europe with my qualification over my gap year.
I recommend looking at gaining employment through companies like Meddeas, or CAPS for work without much experience.

If you really want to work in the EFL sector, I would really recommend doing voluntary work at a younger age to really show your enthusiasm: teaching is pretty much 1 part knowledge to 1 part enthusiasm.

If you're 13 - 18 and want experience in a English teaching environment, apply for Diverbo, it looks really good for employers in the future.
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TheMorgz
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I have a CELTA without a degree, and actually, it's helped me find work and other teaching opportunities since. I had 5 years teaching experience before the CELTA, which obviously helped me get onto the course. Now, I am going to uni this year to study travel and tourism management... again, without that CELTA, I wouldn't have been able to start from year one.Sure, I'm not expecting to find work in Asia just yet for those reasons above, but I have managed to bag myself decent jobs in Australia and New Zealand and the UK. I have two teaching jobs lined up this year. One as a ELT Teacher and the other, a supply Teacher for secondary schools.Don't let all the horror stories and negative people put you off. Just do you! Follow your heart, dude.
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