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    The whole experience of living by yourself and moving away from home, making new friends, going out several times a week, joining societies, the dedication you have to put into your work, living on little money.....

    Would I get a lot out of the experience if I went, even at my age (nearly 26)?
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    (Original post by spiral87)
    The whole experience of living by yourself and moving away from home, making new friends, going out several times a week, joining societies, the dedication you have to put into your work, living on little money.....

    Would I get a lot out of the experience if I went, even at my age (nearly 26)?
    Personally, I thin everybody should go to uni. It's just a good experience that changes you.

    Having said that, I don't think uni is for everybody because the workload and low marks (if you don't put the work in) can drag you down. And because if it's not a career that absolutely requires a degree, you might end up with debt for no good reason other than you wanted to get away, live by yourself and make new friends (which you can do if you move out to a different city). It's really up to you to decide.
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    I started uni at 26 and I sometimes regret not going when I was younger as I sometimes wonder I missed out. I study at a local community college rather than at Liverpool Hope itself and most of the people doing my degree are mature students and many have kids I was never going to have a traditional university experience, however if you study on campus and are around a mixture of people I dont see why you cant. My brother went to uni straight from sixth form and lived away. He told me that there was students 25+ who socialised with the younger students.

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    (Original post by katyness)
    Personally, I thin everybody should go to uni. It's just a good experience that changes you.

    Having said that, I don't think uni is for everybody because the workload and low marks (if you don't put the work in) can drag you down. And because if it's not a career that absolutely requires a degree, you might end up with debt for no good reason other than you wanted to get away, live by yourself and make new friends (which you can do if you move out to a different city). It's really up to you to decide.
    Do you think even to go for a year and drop out would be a waste of time? My A-Levels were 7 years ago now, BCDD, not exactly the most flattering grades. I just think I'm missing out on a lot of fun
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    (Original post by spiral87)
    Do you think even to go for a year and drop out would be a waste of time? My A-Levels were 7 years ago now, BCDD, not exactly the most flattering grades. I just think I'm missing out on a lot of fun
    Grades dont matter so much if youre applying as a mature student, although youd probably need to take an assessment to prove that you are up to standard. I didnt even do A Levels yet I still got onto a degree.

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    (Original post by spiral87)
    Do you think even to go for a year and drop out would be a waste of time? My A-Levels were 7 years ago now, BCDD, not exactly the most flattering grades. I just think I'm missing out on a lot of fun

    Grades dont matter so much if youre applying as a mature student, although youd probably need to take an assessment to prove that you are up to standard. I didnt even do A Levels yet I still got onto a degree.


    What she said.
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    (Original post by gemmam)
    Grades dont matter so much if youre applying as a mature student, although youd probably need to take an assessment to prove that you are up to standard. I didnt even do A Levels yet I still got onto a degree.

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    And despite your lack of A-Levels, it didn't matter that you had gaps in your knowledge?

    How does the loans/fees process work as a mature student?
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    (Original post by spiral87)
    The whole experience of living by yourself and moving away from home, making new friends, going out several times a week, joining societies, the dedication you have to put into your work, living on little money.....

    Would I get a lot out of the experience if I went, even at my age (nearly 26)?
    If you think you'll like studying a subject in great depth and you're a social animal who loves meeting new people (with the inevitable drinking and partying), then university will be right up your alley.
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    (Original post by spiral87)
    And despite your lack of A-Levels, it didn't matter that you had gaps in your knowledge?

    How does the loans/fees process work as a mature student?
    I didnt struggle with the work if thats what you mean, although it felt a bit odd doing essays again. Although most of the people in my class had been on an access course there were a few others like me who'd been out of education for a while and they seem to get on just fine. You just apply though student fiance like you would as a 18-21 year old but if youre 25+ it goes on your personal income rather than your households.

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    (Original post by Bassetts)
    If you think you'll like studying a subject in great depth and you're a social animal who loves meeting new people (with the inevitable drinking and partying), then university will be right up your alley.
    That's the dream. When I went to college, I studied subjects I'd enjoy, not subjects that would be useful. Based on my real life experience, studying business or IT would be far more useful than studying history or psychology, but I know what I'd rather do for three years.
 
 
 
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