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    Hi I am thinking about doing a chemistry degree, but I'm not sure what career to do in the future. I just want to know how difficult it is going into investment banking, patent law, accountancy or actuarial science after completing a chemistry degree. I'm enquiring because I just want to explore some options that don't involve research. Any other career suggestions would be much appreciated too. Thanks!
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    Most of the job prospects you listed would be more suited to a Maths degree.. don't you think?
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    (Original post by Devina)
    Hi I am thinking about doing a chemistry degree, but I'm not sure what career to do in the future. I just want to know how difficult it is going into investment banking, patent law, accountancy or actuarial science after completing a chemistry degree. I'm enquiring because I just want to explore some options that don't involve research. Any other career suggestions would be much appreciated too. Thanks!
    My flatmate did Chemistry, he's now a tax trainee at a Big 4.
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    (Original post by CSM1996)
    Most of the job prospects you listed would be more suited to a Maths degree.. don't you think?
    I do agree that they are more suited to a Maths degree,

    but I just wanted to know whether after the three/ four years of doing a chemistry degree if I decide that research is not for me, are these careers still an option?

    And if they are how difficult is it to get into them after doing chemistry?
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    (Original post by Le Nombre)
    My flatmate did Chemistry, he's now a tax trainee at a Big 4.
    Where did he do Chemistry? And did he have to do any extra courses?
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    (Original post by Devina)
    Where did he do Chemistry? And did he have to do any extra courses?
    Leicester, First. Well he's got to do his ACA training obviously but not whilst he was at uni.
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    (Original post by Devina)
    I do agree that they are more suited to a Maths degree,

    but I just wanted to know whether after the three/ four years of doing a chemistry degree if I decide that research is not for me, are these careers still an option?

    And if they are how difficult is it to get into them after doing chemistry?
    Accountancy is a very popular career choice for chemistry graduates. Your degree should leave you highly numerate and an adept problem solver, which is just what you need.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    Accountancy is a very popular career choice for chemistry graduates. Your degree should leave you highly numerate and an adept problem solver, which is just what you need.
    Thank you for replying, are you a chemistry graduate?
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    (Original post by Devina)
    Thank you for replying, are you a chemistry graduate?
    Nearly! :eek:
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    yeah some people who wanna go into business and law side of products or any science related things have a chemistry degree. Great range of opportunities with chemistry actually that aren't all research
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    how would you actually go from chemistry degree to accountancy law, which qualifications do you need? Just curious, im not sure if research is for me yet, and just want to know about the other options.
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    There are probably better options to go into finance but chemistry is fine
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    You don't have to be a researcher to stay in chemistry. There are a lot of technical areas in industry that need chemists. I'm often worried that so many potential students of chemistry aren't told that you can get a job in chemistry without a PhD and you aren't chained to the bench either.
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    My friend does chemistry and he told me people either go into research or accountancy or other banking/maths related things.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    You don't have to be a researcher to stay in chemistry. There are a lot of technical areas in industry that need chemists. I'm often worried that so many potential students of chemistry aren't told that you can get a job in chemistry without a PhD and you aren't chained to the bench either.
    Doing what exactly. The impression that is often prescribed is that one is greatly hindered without a PhD quickly hitting the proverbial glass ceiling. Also are workers in these jobs ever likely to earn in excess of 40k after many years of experience like they would had their talents been utilitised in the graduate market (ofcause I take into consideration how competitive this sector is). I guess the point I'm making is what exactly is the incentive or advantage of a BSc or Msc Chemist to do a technical job over a standard graduate job?

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    (Original post by Complex Simplicity)
    Doing what exactly. The impression that is often prescribed is that one is greatly hindered without a PhD quickly hitting the proverbial glass ceiling. Also are workers in these jobs ever likely to earn in excess of 40k after many years of experience like they would had their talents been utilitised in the graduate market (ofcause I take into consideration how competitive this sector is). I guess the point I'm making is what exactly is the incentive or advantage of a BSc or Msc Chemist to do a technical job over a standard graduate job?

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    In the engineering rather than chemical industries is a good place to start. I work in the energy industry and there are plenty of first degree only graduate chemists with senior technical roles earning well over £40k.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    In the engineering rather than chemical industries is a good place to start. I work in the energy industry and there are plenty of first degree only graduate chemists with senior technical roles earning well over £40k.
    Thanks for the reply. Is that the norm for senior technical engineers to only have a BSc yet earn that amount?

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    my dad did an 'applied chemistry' degree and was working for Unilever, than he was made redundant and is now a chemistry teacher
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    (Original post by Complex Simplicity)
    Thanks for the reply. Is that the norm for senior technical engineers to only have a BSc yet earn that amount?

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    More likely at undergrad masters level (MEng) as you need that for chartership now, but yes it is normal for engineers not to have any further academic qualifications.
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    (Original post by Complex Simplicity)
    Doing what exactly. The impression that is often prescribed is that one is greatly hindered without a PhD quickly hitting the proverbial glass ceiling. Also are workers in these jobs ever likely to earn in excess of 40k after many years of experience like they would had their talents been utilitised in the graduate market (ofcause I take into consideration how competitive this sector is). I guess the point I'm making is what exactly is the incentive or advantage of a BSc or Msc Chemist to do a technical job over a standard graduate job?

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    Not sure why you differentiate between graduate and technical jobs. Have you been listening to academics?

    You can move up from the bottom and I daresay that is much preferred where I work, especially if you have a formal qualification like a HNC/D or BSc to back up the practical experience.

    I certainly know people earning astronomical money who don't have degrees.

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