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V602- Welfare Amendment Bill 2013 watch

  • View Poll Results: Should this bill be passed into law?
    As many are of the opinion, Aye
    52.63%
    On the contrary, No
    28.95%
    Abstain
    18.42%

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    V602- Welfare Amendment Bill 2013, TSR Opposition


    Welfare Amendment Act


    Preamble
    An act to ensure the principle of the Resident's Income is maintained, and that rates are not allowed to dwindle below the cost of living.

    BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

    (1) To repeal section 2 (4) of the Welfare Act 2012:

    (Original post by Welfare Act 2012)
    (4) These amounts are subject to an annual review.
    (2) To insert the following into the Welfare Act 2012:

    Welfare Act 2012 2 (4) These amounts are subject to an annual review, the results of which are to be announced by the Government on the first Monday of October each year;
    (i) unless there is no Government at that time, in which case the results shall be announced two weeks following the formation of a new Government.
    (ii) The results of the initial review will be announced on the twenty-first of October 2013.
    (a) Should they be decreased, frozen or risen by an amount less than the inflation from the point at which they were last reviewed according to the most recent available Retail Price Index, the results of the review will be subject to a vote in Parliament.
    (b) Should this vote fail, rates will be risen in line with the RPI measure of inflation.
    (c) The results of this review, subject to the potential Parliamentary vote, will be applied for all payments under the Resident's Income scheme from the start of the next financial year.


    (3) This Act extends to the United Kingdom

    (4) (a) This Act may be cited as the Welfare Bill 2013.
    (b) This Act comes into force immediately following Royal Assent.


    Change from second reading:

    Altered the date of initial review so that one occurs in 2013.

    Changes from first reading:

    Reorganised to increase clarity

    Changed the provision for ongoing elections to a general one for when there is no Government, to include occurrences such as a VoNC resulting in there being no Government whilst coalition discussions are re-opened.

    Delayed increases until the new financial year.

    Notes:

    The current Resident's Income rates as per the Welfare and Tax (Amendment) Act 2012 are:
    1st adult (16-64 years): £164.00 per week
    Subsequent adults (16-64 years): £94.00 per week
    1st pensioner (65+ years): £132.00 per week
    Subsequent pensioners (65+ years): £60.50 per week
    Child aged 12-15 years: £89.00 per week
    Child aged 5-11 years: £68.50 per week
    Child aged 3-4: £62.00 per week
    Child aged 0-2: £55.00 per week

    The purpose of this amendment is to ensure that Parliamentary Approval is needed for the Government to go against the ideology of the original Welfare Act 2012 that passed a vote in Parliament. The Resident's Income was designed and the rates set at such a rate as to ensure all British residents could have a decent standard or living whether or not they were able to find work. Were it to be left alone, inflation would be such that the amounts would decrease in their real value, and would no longer provide this decent standard of living. Whilst the original act does stipulate an annual review, it does not set out the specifics of this, and thus allows the Government to effectively erode the principle of the Resident's Income without putting it to a vote. This forces Parliament to re-affirm it's own law each year to maintain the rates, which is bureaucratic and undemocratic. Should this amendment pass, any real-terms decrease in the Resident's Income would be possible only with the blessing of Parliament.
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    I'm unsure why you're using RPI, it's a lot more prone to fluctuations due its association with house prices. On top of that promising increases associated with CPI gives us more room to adjust welfare payments than RPI, which will almost always be higher that the rate of inflation as measured by CPI.
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    (Original post by Donniee)
    I'm unsure why you're using RPI, it's a lot more prone to fluctuations due its association with house prices. On top of that promising increases associated with CPI gives us more room to adjust welfare payments than RPI, which will almost always be higher that the rate of inflation as measured by CPI.
    The original Welfare Act abolished central Government funding for Housing Benefit, instead outsourcing it to local councils with the only stipulation being that support must be offered to the minority of households earning below £16,000 a year. Thus, this welfare will in the vast majority of cases be used in part to pay for costs associated with housing, be that rent or mortgage re-payments. Hence, RPI was used due to the fact that housing costs were relevant to the payments and should be taken into account
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    The Ayes to the right: 20
    The Noes to the left: 11
    Abstentions: 7

    So the Ayes have it, the Ayes have it! Unlock!
 
 
 
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