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    I'm in year 10 at the moment (so, yes I know it's a while away but I'm that kind of person) and when I finish college I want to go to Uni (preferably Durham) to study Law. And then on to do a J.D in America. But I really want to do law at A-Level (Along With Psychology, Sociology and Textiles[dropping it at A2]) because the law course at my local college looks really good. But I heard that some Uni's don't like you taking law at A-level, does it really make a difference, what Uni's don't like it, could it majorly hinder my chances of studying at Durham :confused::confused:
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    You're in year 10, so you really don't need to worry at this point. Some people in year 12 weren't even sure if they were doing the right subjects, including me. also, mate I reallyyy doubt you'll get into a top Russell Group uni with A level in textiles (even if you drop it), psychology, law and sociology.. Law is so competitive and you need strong A Levels that -more than anything - are humanities.
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    if you want to get into a top uni, don't do law A level. Unis don't like it because it's such a soft course, it doesn't prepare students for the demands of the degree version.
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    Weird thing I've heard on UCAS convention is that if you want to do law, you don't take law A-level.
    Instead go for subjects like English and history.

    Law is a soft A-level apparently. Personally, I don't think I can get A in law easily though :L.

    Don't take textile A-level either - it's a soft. Unless you want to take 5 AS's then it's fine but that may be too stressful and may affect your performance.

    I suggest you take English, history, psychology and sociology.
    Other advices maybe more helpful - ask your teachers.
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    Well, my son did Law at A and A2 level and is now on a Law degree course (although not at a Russel Group uni). An 'A' grade in a soft subject is a lot better than a 'C' in something hard, although an 'A' in a difficult subject is the gold standard.

    Anyway, if you want to get in Law at Durham (my old uni) you will need 'A' grades in perhaps two or three traditional subjects, so rethink all your choices. As well as that, an 'A' in Law would probably help. Do be aware that doing Law at 'A' level does not help with a degree course, since degrees are designed for people who are new to the subject.

    The bottom line: if you want to go somewhere like Durham you should rethink all your choices, and concentrate on traditional school subjects.
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    Hi, I'm a teacher. If you want to study law pick History, English Literature and Sociology. History - weighing up evidence, English - writing essays and Sociology - understanding how crime is produced rather than happens.
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    I do History GCSE (Which I enjoy and am on tack for A) so thinking about it, it would make sense for me to take it. But definitely not taking English, it's not that I'm bad at it I just HATE it & I've got a really awful teacher for the next two years (No joke he spends half the lesson telling us to shut up when we are barley even talking and the other half stood at the front talking about irrelevant crap) so I don't think English is a viable option for me . If I took Law, Psychology, Sociology & History but then I would have no idea what to drop at the end of AS
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    As I understand it, the issues unis have with Law A-level aren't that it's overly soft but that it makes those who go on to study law at uni complacent. Not all schools offer it, so unis have to run their degree courses from scratch, so if you'd done the A-level there would always be the temptation to not pay attention as you know a lot already. But as long as you don't let yourself slide into that and accept that you're going to have to start over, it's a decent enough choice. I did it and am now doing Law at Cambridge, so it hardly hurt my chances!

    In terms of A-level choices I'd definitely recommend getting rid of textiles - it's completely irrelevant to what you want to do. You'll want at least two strong, essay-based subjects but there are plenty of those - English and History are the most common choices but stuff like economics, geography, RE etc will also do. No harm in throwing a science into the mix either - Law involves a lot of reasoning and logic.
 
 
 

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