Want to get into Financial IT or related jobs Watch

okap
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what degree would I need to get into the field of Financial IT or Banking with programming. I need to know quick cause Im applying very soon. So should I do a business with computer course? a computer science course? software engineering? or any others? please I need help.

Thanks

Orhan
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javaguru
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computer science degree will certainly help you get into programming.
Try to do some financial course part time or get into open source development related to financial technologies..
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by okap)
what degree would I need to get into the field of Financial IT or Banking with programming. I need to know quick cause Im applying very soon. So should I do a business with computer course? a computer science course? software engineering? or any others? please I need help.

Thanks

Orhan
Those industries? Forget CompSci, the employers will just bin your CV. You need to have studied either Mathematics or Physics. I'm fairly versed in this, as my stepfather works in that specific field, and he *****es about CompSci grads applying for jobs they're clearly not qualified for.
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roblee
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(Original post by iainvg)
Those industries? Forget CompSci, the employers will just bin your CV. You need to have studied either Mathematics or Physics. I'm fairly versed in this, as my stepfather works in that specific field, and he *****es about CompSci grads applying for jobs they're clearly not qualified for.
I'm also rather well-versed in this, being in the third year of a computer science undergrad; and a rather significant fraction of my past/current course-mates currently work in finance. We've also had quite a few banks giving talks or sponsoring events in an attempt to impel more people to apply.

Is it possible that your step-father's experience isn't quite representative of the industry? I can imagine a lot of higher-tier stuff is done by mathematicians and scientists, but it seems unlikely that they do much in the way of the sysadmin or day-to-day software work because that's just not their specialist area.
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by roblee)
I'm also rather well-versed in this, being in the third year of a computer science undergrad; and a rather significant fraction of my past/current course-mates currently work in finance. We've also had quite a few banks giving talks or sponsoring events in an attempt to impel more people to apply.

Is it possible that your step-father's experience isn't quite representative of the industry? I can imagine a lot of higher-tier stuff is done by mathematicians and scientists, but it seems unlikely that they do much in the way of the sysadmin or day-to-day software work because that's just not their specialist area.
Well, the company he works for (and has been working for, for over a decade) is a pretty big conglomerate by the name of NEC. Other choice of course would be for the OP to go down the COBOL route, as they're in pretty high demand at the moment as the finance industries current COBOL crowd are all verging on retirement age now.
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roblee
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(Original post by iainvg)
Well, the company he works for (and has been working for, for over a decade) is a pretty big conglomerate by the name of NEC. Other choice of course would be for the OP to go down the COBOL route, as they're in pretty high demand at the moment as the finance industries current COBOL crowd are all verging on retirement age now.
That's a good point- as I understand it COBOL and also JVM-based programming languages are the main development tools at the moment for systems logic and internal tools so anyone learning those has a fair head-start.

Of course, since the OP's plan sounds rather oddly specific (why fixate on a career in finance, 4 years in advance of actually needing to make a decision?) my advice in response to that original question would probably be the standard "pick the course you think you'll do best at, work hard at it, learn as much as you can and then revisit your plans in a couple of years when it's time to put them into action".
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