Gambling addiction

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Dear TSR,

I need your help, I need to help myself because I don't feel this addiction is healthy for me I have become addicted to the FOBT in bookies (those virutal consoles) and I keep losing a lot of money on them. I went into the bookies yesterday and put in £50 and lost it all on a game of roulette within 3 or 4 spins. I then went to the ATM and took out £250 and went back to the bookies. I thought that would be able to easily recover my losses if I had more money at my disposal.

I quickly turned that £250 into £320 and was up £20 however, I couldn't walk away. In the end I lost it all because uncovered numbers kept coming up. I left the shop absolutely devastated and I felt really low, I just wanted to cry. I have been doing this for the past 2 years now and I need to stop.

I know that those machines are the crack cocaine of the gambling world however, I keep going back to them. I don't know why, but I think it's the rush I get the wheel is spinning. I will go into a bookie and a good day and make a profit however, I will lose all that profit and more the next time I put my money into one of those machines. Also it's so easy to lose a lot of money in a short period of time, I feel that once the money is in the machine I lose the concept of the value of my money. I also hate being in the bookies, having men stare over my shoulders like Hyenas scrutinising my every bet is really horrible because they get frontrow seats to watch me lose my money.

I want to stop this horrible addiction and I want to use this thread as a diary of my progress. If you have advice for me then I would greatly appreciate it.

Kind Regards.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#2
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#2
*****Update One*****

I must admit that creating this thread has helped me feel better today, it's nice to know that I can type all my feelings and thoughts in here without being scared to do so. I went to my town centre a few minutes ago and was able to avoid even glancing at the William Hill or Ladbrokes. However, I feel my addiction is more prevalent when I am bored and have some money on me, I was neither bored or had a substantial amount of money on me today. Fingers crossed that I can keep this up
0
reply
Sabertooth
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
I'm not sure how well this would work, but could you try leaving your debit card at home and only taking enough money out with you for what you need to buy?
1
reply
Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by Sabertooth)
I'm not sure how well this would work, but could you try leaving your debit card at home and only taking enough money out with you for what you need to buy?
Unfortunately that is not the problem, I have left my card at home before and still withdrawn money from the bank (over the counter by providing my details).
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#5
*****Update Two*****

Well like an idiot I ended up in the bookies, this thread or my dtermination to stop gambling didn't even come to mind, I lost £250 again today I am going to try and go a step further and not enter a bookies at all from now on
.
0
reply
nmr1991
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
If it makes you feel any better, I wasted £700 from my student loan on games, usually privileges that take you weeks to achieve which I was too impatient to wait/progress on, not gonna lie, some of it was on WoW.
0
reply
techno-thriller
Badges: 14
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
I hope you recover m8
0
reply
CUfan
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
Addictions are tough to overcome... The best advice I have for you is have someone that you trust that you can call each night and let them know how you did and just be accountable to them... It also helps talking to that person or anyone else who knows when you get the feeling of wanting to go into the bookies or whatever else

Just take it a day at a time and best of luck!!
0
reply
username504651
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
We're currently learning about gambling addictions in psychology and it's interesting to read your account. I don't mean that to sound rude because you're obviously struggling. Try taking up a hobby or something to overcome the boredom you mention
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#10
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by techno-thriller)
I hope you recover m8
Thank you pal


(Original post by nmr1991)
If it makes you feel any better, I wasted £700 from my student loan on games, usually privileges that take you weeks to achieve which I was too impatient to wait/progress on, not gonna lie, some of it was on WoW.
I wish I had spent my money on actual things I could enjoy however, I suppose the rush of gambling is great it's just the end product of losing it all.


(Original post by CUfan)
Addictions are tough to overcome... The best advice I have for you is have someone that you trust that you can call each night and let them know how you did and just be accountable to them... It also helps talking to that person or anyone else who knows when you get the feeling of wanting to go into the bookies or whatever else

Just take it a day at a time and best of luck!!
Thank you for the advice.

(Original post by lauraaaaa)
We're currently learning about gambling addictions in psychology and it's interesting to read your account. I don't mean that to sound rude because you're obviously struggling. Try taking up a hobby or something to overcome the boredom you mention
You don't sound rude, it would be interesting to hear about some of the things you're learning Thank you for the advice.
0
reply
username504651
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by Anonymous)
You don't sound rude, it would be interesting to hear about some of the things you're learning Thank you for the advice.
I can pm you if you're actually interested and tell me who you are hah. Or I can post it on here.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#12
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#12
*****Update Three*****

I have not stepped foot into a bookies since my last update so I am happy about that however, it could be down to the fact that I have been at home quite a lot and have been studying for exams. Hopefully now that some of my exams are over I will not be tempted to start playing those roulette machines, fingers crossed.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#13
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#13
(Original post by lauraaaaa)
I can pm you if you're actually interested and tell me who you are hah. Or I can post it on here.
If you could post it on this thread it would be great, I don't want to reveal my TSR identity.

Thank you.
0
reply
techno-thriller
Badges: 14
#14
Report 7 years ago
#14
I was going to say, if some mates and you go, and you see them lose money, does that put you off? Or do you go alone?
0
reply
username504651
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
There are three explanations I've learnt about and each explains why people start, maintain and relapse in gambling:

Biological
Initiation
Basically that genetics are the cause

Maintenance
Under active pituitary adrenal response. Those who gamble pathologically release less cortisol. Also, gamblers require high levels of sensory stimulation and so they gamble to try and increase their sensory arousal. They also have a lower anticipation of risk so are more likely to gamble.

Relapse
Because they need high stimulation, they are prone to boredom and so are more likely to go back to gambling, to avoid this boredom. This is something you mentioned

Cognitive
Initiation
Self medicate for psychological problems or stress they are undergoing. They pick an addiction (can be subconsciously) that they believe will help with their problems even though it actually won't. Gambling is usually associated with depression and poverty

Maintenance
They believe that they are skilled at gambling and that they are able to manipulate the outcome in some way. They may wait until a certain number of people have used the machine, for example, because they believe that being that number person will give them a win. They may also believe that winning is based on recent events e.g three heads will follow three tails in a coin toss.

Relapse
They relapse because they have a recall bias. Gamblers tend to over estimate and remember losses whereas they underestimate, forget or rationalise losses. They believe that they eventually will win because they 'deserve' to win after their losses.

Learning
Initiation
Begin gambling because of the physical (buzz), psychological, social (peer praise) and financial (money) rewards. These consequences are positive and so are likely to be repeated.

Maintenance
Intermittent reinforcement occurs. Gambler get used to long periods of time without a win but are encouraged by the occasional win.
Social approval may be another reason. Often family and friends of gamblers approve of gambling or take part in it themselves so may congratulate a win etc.

Relapse
Addicts associate cues with their addiction e.g bright lights, noises of the machine and so anytime they come into contact with these, they feel the urge to gamble

I'm not saying these are true or fit your situation, just what we've been learning!
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#16
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#16
(Original post by lauraaaaa)
There are three explanations I've learnt about and each explains why people start, maintain and relapse in gambling:

Biological
Initiation
Basically that genetics are the cause

Maintenance
Under active pituitary adrenal response. Those who gamble pathologically release less cortisol. Also, gamblers require high levels of sensory stimulation and so they gamble to try and increase their sensory arousal. They also have a lower anticipation of risk so are more likely to gamble.

Relapse
Because they need high stimulation, they are prone to boredom and so are more likely to go back to gambling, to avoid this boredom. This is something you mentioned

Cognitive
Initiation
Self medicate for psychological problems or stress they are undergoing. They pick an addiction (can be subconsciously) that they believe will help with their problems even though it actually won't. Gambling is usually associated with depression and poverty

Maintenance
They believe that they are skilled at gambling and that they are able to manipulate the outcome in some way. They may wait until a certain number of people have used the machine, for example, because they believe that being that number person will give them a win. They may also believe that winning is based on recent events e.g three heads will follow three tails in a coin toss.

Relapse
They relapse because they have a recall bias. Gamblers tend to over estimate and remember losses whereas they underestimate, forget or rationalise losses. They believe that they eventually will win because they 'deserve' to win after their losses.

Learning
Initiation
Begin gambling because of the physical (buzz), psychological, social (peer praise) and financial (money) rewards. These consequences are positive and so are likely to be repeated.

Maintenance
Intermittent reinforcement occurs. Gambler get used to long periods of time without a win but are encouraged by the occasional win.
Social approval may be another reason. Often family and friends of gamblers approve of gambling or take part in it themselves so may congratulate a win etc.

Relapse
Addicts associate cues with their addiction e.g bright lights, noises of the machine and so anytime they come into contact with these, they feel the urge to gamble

I'm not saying these are true or fit your situation, just what we've been learning!
Interesting, I think I fit in to the learning explanation. Thank you for posting
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#17
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#17
*****Update Four*****

I went to the bookies yesterday after withdrawing £250, I started placing bets on the roulette and started rapidly losing my money. I went down to as low as £60 at one point and thought I was going to lose it all. However, after a few good spins on 0 and covered numbers I started to make money again. I just wanted to get my £250 back and get the Hell out of there. I made $260 and walked out. It seems ridiculous that I risked all that money for £10, I felt good though when I walked out. Had I lost it all I would have felt depressed for the rest of the day.
0
reply
nmr1991
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 years ago
#18
Think of it as an alternative to smoking, drugs or alcohol, it won't be a danger to your physical health but mental health could be affected. It's alright if you have a job or on JSA which I have neither of since i am in education and using my loan. Its no reason to be depressed, if you enjoy it rather than being addicted like going to an arcade or something, there are many people who lose more than they started with especially using those fruit machines. You could think of all the people in every casino in the world losing much more money knowing you're not the only one.
0
reply
rachiriot
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#19
Report 7 years ago
#19
Have you thought about maybe discussing it with a health professional? Also, a little idea I had, not sure if it would help but maybe! Do you think maybe finding something else to spend your money on could be beneficial? I'm not sure what other hobbies you have, but you could maybe look into spending it on music events, or like a friend of mine who is really into cycling so blows all his money on building bikes! Maybe look into finding something else to take up the time and money you'd spend on gambling =D Good luck with it =D
0
reply
Jay84
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#20
Report 7 years ago
#20
Hi, I see you haven't updated recently but I was browsing the web in relation to gambling issues and came across this and thought I would reply.

The main thing I wanted to say was to treat this stuff seriously. Just for an indication of how these things can go, let me tell you where gambling has taken me:

I am 29 now and have been gambling for over ten years and have made a real mess of my life. At my worst, I have been waiting outside the bookies at 8:30am; stayed till 9:30pm then gone to the casino till silly o'clock for days on end.

I've just lost my girlfriend and been kicked out of the house (not the first time I have been made or made myself homeless) and have also just been bankrupted with debts totalling just over £60,000.

I am nearing thirty years of age, have no job, am crashing in my mums spare room (and VERY lucky that she is letting me stay) and don't have a penny in the world.

When I got thrown out of my flat, all of my possessions fit into a small holdall - I have sold/pawned all my possessions to the extent that I was selling my clothes by weight for a mere couple of quid to gamble.

I have barely any friends left and am depressed to the extent that I have attempted and been on the verge of doing very stupid and very irreversible things. Only a few weeks ago, I pawned something that didn't belong to me and then walked into a bookies with a claw hammer and chisel determined to crack open a FOBT and take the cash box in the event that I didn't make the money to do the buyback. In my sick mind at the time I was kidding myself that it wasn't armed robbery and would just be classed as theft and vandalism if it all went tits up. I am not a violent man but gambling addiction can really take you as far as alcohol, gear, crack and other addictions. I have stolen, lied and committed various fraudulent acts. I come from a good home too but have seen first hand that it is possible to go totally off the rails without needing anything to prompt you into it. In my more desperate moments I don't fear prison or homelessness any more yet when I get moments of clarity - my own attitude to such things frightens me.

I don't know your situation and how you are doing now but if you think you still have a problem, get in touch with Gamcare or go to a GA (Gambler's Anonymous) meeting.

Even if your situation isn't that desperate or you aren't sure how addicted you are, it may be worth going to a GA meeting or two just to see where gambling has taken people to see if it helps give you resolve to deal with your own problem. Maybe my story would alarm a lot of straight, honest folk who lead a normal honest life but in GA they barely bat an eyelid because you hear a lot worse.

At the moment I am just a week off a bet and hopefully I will stick with GA and try to rebuild a life but I wish I had understood when I was at the stage of just doing in the odd £50-£100 what the path I was choosing was going to end up leading me to.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now?

Anxiousness about lockdown easing (192)
5.06%
Uncertainty around my education (555)
14.62%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (424)
11.17%
Lack of purpose or motivation (522)
13.75%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (189)
4.98%
Impact of lockdown on physical health (227)
5.98%
Loneliness (318)
8.38%
Financial worries (140)
3.69%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (148)
3.9%
Exposure to negative news/social media (170)
4.48%
Lack of real life entertainment (215)
5.67%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (339)
8.93%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (356)
9.38%

Watched Threads

View All