Science ISA Coursework

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staticas
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Science ISA Coursework

Mine is next Wednesay for Physics, the topic is Electrolosis.. the experiment is some sort of battery pack connected to crocodile clips that are holding a metal each, one has a carbon electrode and one has a copper electrode (impure copper), the electrodes are being dipped into a beaker full of copper sulphate. After leaving for a while, you take the electrodes and measure them one by one.

That's just what I know so far about the experiment. Apparently we need to figure out our own hypothesis. I was thinking 'The longer electrodes are left in copper sulphate, the more copper is developed.' but maybe different or better worded.

I was just wondering how exactly it is possible to get an A* on this? I really need all the help I can get in Science, so the possibility to pull up my grade with an A* worth 25% would be beneficial.

I know it is possible to get an A*, but I did this test (or similar) multiple times last year and I have failed to get anything higher than a B. I am hoping to get an A in Additional Science.. I got a C on Core (I don't know if you can resit, but I hope you can, if so I will do that in sixth form).

If anybody that has had an A* in this has any tips/advice, please help me out. ​I imagine any advice could also be helpful to others reading too, as I think alot of people will have an ISA coming up. :grin:
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I have an ISA aswell but on a different topic in science. We were told today but all I know is that we will habe 2 test papers. So get 100% on those and its A*?
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(Original post by staticas)
Science ISA Coursework

Mine is next Wednesay for Physics, the topic is Electrolosis.. the experiment is some sort of battery pack connected to crocodile clips that are holding a metal each, one has a carbon electrode and one has a copper electrode (impure copper), the electrodes are being dipped into a beaker full of copper sulphate. After leaving for a while, you take the electrodes and measure them one by one.

That's just what I know so far about the experiment. Apparently we need to figure out our own hypothesis. I was thinking 'The longer electrodes are left in copper sulphate, the more copper is developed.' but maybe different or better worded.

I was just wondering how exactly it is possible to get an A* on this? I really need all the help I can get in Science, so the possibility to pull up my grade with an A* worth 25% would be beneficial.

I know it is possible to get an A*, but I did this test (or similar) multiple times last year and I have failed to get anything higher than a B. I am hoping to get an A in Additional Science.. I got a C on Core (I don't know if you can resit, but I hope you can, if so I will do that in sixth form).

If anybody that has had an A* in this has any tips/advice, please help me out. ​I imagine any advice could also be helpful to others reading too, as I think alot of people will have an ISA coming up. :grin:
I've done this for Chemistry, got 19/20 on paper 1 and awaiting paper 2 marks, if you have any questions ask me :-)

For your hypothesis, I would say 'the rate at which copper is deposited increases' instead:-)

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staticas
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
I have an ISA aswell but on a different topic in science. We were told today but all I know is that we will habe 2 test papers. So get 100% on those and its A*?
I think you do 2 then keep the best result.
Unless you're doing triple science, or with a different exam board.
(Original post by majmuh24)
I've done this for Chemistry, got 19/20 on paper 1 and awaiting paper 2 marks, if you have any questions ask me :-)

For your hypothesis, I would say 'the rate at which copper is deposited increases' instead:-)

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Thankyou for the hypothesis, and wondering where to find/how to write your method.
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(Original post by staticas)
I think you do 2 then keep the best result.
Unless you're doing triple science, or with a different exam board.

Thankyou for the hypothesis, and wondering where to find/how to write your method.
What lesson are you on at the moment?

For the method, you need a detailed equipment list, circuit diagram, a detailed write up of the actual method, why is it a fair test, and a risk assessment. You are marked on your written communication, so take your time and check your grammar

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AlphaMolecule
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I've done this ISA and it is for chemistry, not physics. I got 43/50 which may or may not be an A*, depends on the grade boundaries. But trust me, section 2 is difficult. Section 1 was an easy 19/20, but section 2 brought everyone down... Very tricky stuff there. All I can tell you is to prepare for it well and listen to everything the teacher has to say.
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I've done the chemistry ISA as well, managed to get a 47/50, don't know how but I'm not complaining. I did the electrolysis one, just make sure you've got your notes page filled out properly, which is one thing I never really bothered with, and ended up regretting.


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(Original post by Shortcake37)
I've done the chemistry ISA as well, managed to get a 47/50, don't know how but I'm not complaining. I did the electrolysis one, just make sure you've got your notes page filled out properly, which is one thing I never really bothered with, and ended up regretting.


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Ahh same I did that one last year and got 46/50! Does anybody know roughly what the ums mark would be for that? I'm aware the grade boundaries will be unknown until results time (I think?) but roughly what would it be?
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melody19
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Mine is next Wednesay for Physics, the topic is Electrolosis.. the experiment is some sort of battery pack connected to crocodile clips that are holding a metal each, one has a carbon electrode and one has a copper electrode (impure copper), the electrodes are being dipped into a beaker full of copper sulphate. After leaving for a while, you take the electrodes and measure them one by one.

That's just what I know so far about the experiment. Apparently we need to figure out our own hypothesis. I was thinking 'The longer electrodes are left in copper sulphate, the more copper is developed.' but maybe different or better worded.


I don't know how thoroughly your teachers have explained the exam layout to you but paper 1 is more or less the same each time and you can practically write all your answers to that section on your notes sheet.

Make a hypothesis and then try to explain it using some scientific knowledge. It does not have to be that detailed.
For the question that asks you to compare the research links/books etc just name advantages and disadvantages to both and then decide which one is more useful with a valid reason (e.g one website had a diagram, one had a method etc)

For your method, make sure you have a method that would make sense and that you have all your equipment. Make sure you have quantities for things that need it. Maybe you need a certain concentration of copper sulphate? Or maybe state the mls of it you need.
Say how many times you need to take a reading. I'm not sure if it gets you marks but maybe mention to repeat the experiment twice and then find the mean by adding the values together and diving by the number of values.
For your risk assessment --I think-- that they said put two actual ones. By actual I mean like it could cause irritation to the eyes (btw don't say this, I've just made it up, do your research first!) and one random one like the power pack falling off the table.
This is how you should work your risk assessment: e.g. The hazard is the power pack falling off the table. The risk is *blah blah blah*. A precaution would be to *name precaution here*.

For paper 2, make sure you quote from the values they give you in the table.

Also when they ask you to compare or whatever, (I can't really remember sorry), make sure that the variable that the table is showing is actually the independent variable they've asked you about!

Also learn the scientific words e.g reproducible, repeatable, accurate, etc

I can't really think of anything else but I hope this was helpful enough! Good luck
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fizarock22
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how do we explain our hypothesis?
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(Original post by fizarock22)
how do we explain our hypothesis?
You use the scientific principles you've learned to explain it e.g. for electrolysis talk about the increased negative charge and the effect on this.

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So e.g. i am doing my physics ISA and i made a hypothesis; as the current is increased the resistance increase...now how willl i explain this?
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melody19
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(Original post by fizarock22)
So e.g. i am doing my physics ISA and i made a hypothesis; as the current is increased the resistance increase...now how willl i explain this?
Idk :/ I'm not that great at physics so maybe someone check what I'm about to write but I don't think that works.
I mean, it depends, are you increasing the voltage? But then you need to make voltage your independent variable not current.

Resistance is:

voltage/current. This means that if the voltage is the same, the higher the current the lower the resistance. You may need to get help from someone else but I would explain the hypothesis I just gave, I'll attempt some sort of explanation: because there is less resistance in the circuit, the more electrons can pass through per second (which is what current is). - Idk if you would need to go more in depth, I would try and get help with the concepts behind the hypothesis with your teacher.
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thanks a lot!!
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melody19
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(Original post by fizarock22)
thanks a lot!!
you're welcome
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(Original post by melody19)
Idk :/ I'm not that great at physics so maybe someone check what I'm about to write but I don't think that works.
I mean, it depends, are you increasing the voltage? But then you need to make voltage your independent variable not current.

Resistance is:

voltage/current. This means that if the voltage is the same, the higher the current the lower the resistance. You may need to get help from someone else but I would explain the hypothesis I just gave, I'll attempt some sort of explanation: because there is less resistance in the circuit, the more electrons can pass through per second (which is what current is). - Idk if you would need to go more in depth, I would try and get help with the concepts behind the hypothesis with your teacher.
Current always increases with voltage as resistance is always constant, so you might have messed up here...

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melody19
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(Original post by majmuh24)
Current always increases with voltage as resistance is always constant, so you might have messed up here...

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I wasn't sure if they meant that the voltage increased or stayed the same. If the voltage increases then so will current but if voltage is the same but the value of the current is higher it must mean resistance is lower? (I'm thinking of this in terms of the equation). I don't understand what you mean by saying resistance is always constant? (Physics confuses me easily haha )
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(Original post by melody19)
I wasn't sure if they meant that the voltage increased or stayed the same. If the voltage increases then so will current but if voltage is the same but the value of the current is higher it must mean resistance is lower? (I'm thinking of this in terms of the equation). I don't understand what you mean by saying resistance is always constant? (Physics confuses me easily haha )
Resistance never changes for a material, for example if you have a piece of metal with resistance of 1 Ohm, that will never change, no matter how much current or voltage you put through it (at least that's what I know, there probably is some way to do it using modern technology)

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(Original post by majmuh24)
Resistance never changes for a material, for example if you have a piece of metal with resistance of 1 Ohm, that will never change, no matter how much current or voltage you put through it (at least that's what I know, there probably is some way to do it using modern technology)

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I see what you mean, thank you.
But say in a circuit you had resistors and decided to remove some, reducing the resistance (at the same voltage), would what I thought then be correct and work in that situation?

I apologise to the person above who I gave incorrect info to
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(Original post by melody19)
I see what you mean, thank you.
But say in a circuit you had resistors and decided to remove some, reducing the resistance (at the same voltage), would what I thought then be correct and work in that situation?

I apologise to the person above who I gave incorrect info to
Yes, then in that case the current will be higher as the resistance will have decreased (everything has resistance except superconductors, even just a wire) according to Ohm's Law which is V=IR (I is current, dont ask me why)

If you want to check, see what would happen at a voltage of 6V when the resistance is decreased from 3 Ohms to 1 Ohm

Hope this helps

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