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Asians - Did you wear the Poppy? Why/Why not? watch

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    Hi

    Quick question for the Asians here (Indians/Pakistani/Arab/Bengali etc...).

    Did you wear the poppy?

    I find a lot of asian people who are against wearing the poppy and mock other asians that do. Not entirely sure why though, but I would like to know. From what I could find out, they dislike it as it pays/supports (both financially but visually via the actual poppy) British soilders to go kill people in their own country?

    If your religion/faith (Atheist, Muslim, Christian, Hindu etc...) is part of the reasons why please feel free to elaborate on that too.

    Cheers
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    Yes of course I do.
    A poppy is worn to remember the fallen heroes. Thousands of Asian soldiers died in the war too.
    I don't understand why Asian people wouldn't wear the poppy. The money that is raised goes to a good cause so I don't see a problem with it.
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    Atheist here who donates but doesn't wear poppy.

    Have done in the past but the stupid thing always falls out and I end up with a solitary pin on my lapel.
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    British born Indian- Yes I did wear it with pride Always have and always will.
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    I didn't wear one but only coz I've given up on wearing them, coz they always fall off! :o: I'd much rather just give some money to the people collecting without bothering with the faff of the poppy-wearing/poppy-falling :o:
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    My boyfriend wore one.
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    I saw an Asian lady wearing one in Barnardos this morning :fyi:
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    I'm sure plenty of non-Asians didn't wear the poppy. Let's make a thread asking them why they did/didn't wear it


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    (Original post by 0riental)
    Hi

    Quick question for the Asians here (Indians/Pakistani/Arab/Bengali etc...).

    Did you wear the poppy?

    I find a lot of asian people who are against wearing the poppy and mock other asians that do. Not entirely sure why though, but I would like to know. From what I could find out, they dislike it as it pays/supports (both financially but visually via the actual poppy) British soilders to go kill people in their own country?

    If your religion/faith (Atheist, Muslim, Christian, Hindu etc...) is part of the reasons why please feel free to elaborate on that too.

    Cheers
    Most asians don't wear it because the money raised from it goes towards supporting the armed forces financially. And since the armed forces are occupying Muslim countries and killing them, most Asians who are Muslims refuse to pay for it, simply because they don't want to fund the murder of their own people I guess. If it was just about the world wars I'm sure many more would wear it as plenty f Asians died in the world wars fighting for the British. But supporting what's going on in Iraq and Afghanistan, no thanks. Coming from an asian myself




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    Yes, my great grandpa was in WW2, of course I do.


    Although, recently I've seen a thread where people have been saying that the poppy is now over commercialised and supports current soldiers in unjustified wars.

    A soldier still has a family left behind, and the whole concept of current 'unjustified' wars lack the evidence that they need. Bloody hipsters.

    Sorry for this rant- but I find it a bit strange for someone to call themselves 'British this' e.g. British Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi when you don't acknowledge the history of your primary country (UK). Are you first and foremost a Bangladeshi- British citizen, or are you primarily British- Bangladeshi? I celebrate the independence days of both countries with equal pride.
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    (Original post by weirdnessandcoffee)
    Yes, my great grandpa was in WW2, of course I do.


    Although, recently I've seen a thread where people have been saying that the poppy is now over commercialised and supports current soldiers in unjustified wars.

    A soldier still has a family left behind, and the whole concept of current 'unjustified' wars lack the evidence that they need. Bloody hipsters.

    Sorry for this rant- but I find it a bit strange for someone to call themselves 'British this' e.g. British Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi when you don't acknowledge the history of your country. Are you first and foremost a Bangladesh- British citizen, or are you primarily British- Bangladeshi? I celebrate the independence days of both countries with equal pride.
    I regard myself as British. I hardly ever use the term 'British Indian' as I feel have no connection to India at all.
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    I regard myself as British. I hardly ever use the term 'British Indian' as I feel have no connection to India at all.
    That's perfectly fine. I don't think I said it clear enough- might have to change it, I meant the 'history of your country as the UK'.
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    (Original post by ibbyb94)
    Most asians don't wear it because the money raised from it goes towards supporting the armed forces financially. And since the armed forces are occupying Muslim countries and killing them, most Asians who are Muslims refuse to pay for it, simply because they don't want to fund the murder of their own people I guess. If it was just about the world wars I'm sure many more would wear it as plenty f Asians died in the world wars fighting for the British. But supporting what's going on in Iraq and Afghanistan, no thanks. Coming from an asian myself

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    Most Iraqis have been killed by other Iraqis. Afghanistan was backed by a UN mandate.
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    i didnt. i respect the sacrifices made in the world wars but i dont """"support"""" the army


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    I'm not Asian but just gonna say, I wear a poppy because I want to show respect to the soldiers who brought our country freedom, I don't support what fighting is going on at the moment. I think that people who are against it are ignorant I saw loads of elderly men walking around yesterday during the march in the city with medals on their chests from the war and I think I owe them at least enough respect to wear a poppy for like 5 days in a year!
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    I respect it but do not support the army.


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    I didnt, and i dont. I'm not sure its an accurate representation of how i feel regarding war/soldiers.

    I would like to honour just soldiers who have given up their lives in battle fighting a an honourable cause. WW2 comes to mind.

    However, i feel that the poppy is a vehicle to support all soldiers lost in all wars, which is not something i'm totally behind.

    Soldiers follow orders, and do what they are told, so in that sense, it may seem harsh not to support them. But if a soldier slaughters innocents on order, it becomes hard to support them, regardless if they had a voice in the matter or not.

    The poppy also depicts all soldiers as heroes; this is certainly not true, as has been reported by the media for various heinous acts committed by soldiers on foreign lands. This issue is a murky grey, and not a black and white one.
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    Most Iraqis have been killed by other Iraqis. Afghanistan was backed by a UN mandate.
    Your point is? Hopefully not that Iraqis have always been killing Iraqis so condemning the West for the loss of life in those parts is not justifiable. Because, in fact, I don't think your statement will agree with the statistics. Even if there is the slightest agreement, the West is the one indirectly responsible for the ongoing turmoil in Iraq, because they are the ones who, in effect, went up to that place, messed it up and came back and left them to squabble with each other. The blame for the pandemonium in Iraq that leads to daily loss of life is on the West and anybody who respects what they do is either being blindly loyal or doesn't comprehend the matter fully.
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    Of course as an Indian. Many Hindus, Sikhs etc died in the wars.

    I even support the UKs current foreign policy.
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    (Original post by GreatGalahad)
    Your point is? Hopefully not that Iraqis have always been killing Iraqis so condemning the West for the loss of life in those parts is not justifiable. Because, in fact, I don't think your statement will agree with the statistics. Even if there is the slightest agreement, the West is the one indirectly responsible for the ongoing turmoil in Iraq, because they are the ones who, in effect, went up to that place, messed it up and came back and left them to squabble with each other. The blame for the pandemonium in Iraq that leads to daily loss of life is on the West and anybody who respects what they do is either being blindly loyal or doesn't comprehend the matter fully.
    True story

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