Am I Good Enough to do Fine Art at University? Watch

Ralph900
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As you know any year 13s needs to apply to uni anytime now and I'm wanting to do Fine Art but I'm just not sure if I'm good enough. I'm currently working at grade B at A-level Art & Design but in my class I'm probably about average and I'm worried that everyone at uni will be people who got As and A*s in A-level Art.

Does anyone who has done A-level art know if this is the case and can you tell me judging by a B at A-level Art if I'll be good enough to do it?

Weird question I know, thanks
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Origami Bullets
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Not really my subject area, but it's very common for students to do an art foundation course first

Art GCSE and A Level grades have very little to do with talent and a lot to do with the ability to follow a mark scheme. I believe art schools take more notice of your portfolio.

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MAyman12
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Anybody is good enough for Fine Arts.
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KtLou93
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(Original post by MAyman12)
Anybody is good enough for Fine Arts.
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True... anybody can do a levels as as the end the day all you have to do is 'jump through hoops' to get the marks... so listen and do EVERYTHING your teacher tells you cause they mark you.

If you're serious about doing a fine art course at art school... do an art foundation. Not only will you go to interviews with a better portfolio (I used absolutely NO a level work in my portfolio) it builds your confidence, lets you play with all areas of art and lets you grow as an artist.

I got a B in a level fine art and now I'm at a top drama school doing theatre design.

Hope this helps xx
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PlsGimmeMBBS
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(Original post by Ralph900)
As you know any year 13s needs to apply to uni anytime now and I'm wanting to do Fine Art but I'm just not sure if I'm good enough. I'm currently working at grade B at A-level Art & Design but in my class I'm probably about average and I'm worried that everyone at uni will be people who got As and A*s in A-level Art.

Does anyone who has done A-level art know if this is the case and can you tell me judging by a B at A-level Art if I'll be good enough to do it?

Weird question I know, thanks
Depends which uni
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Ralph900
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I thought about doing a foundation course but what with it being another year before I could go to uni I decided against it. I've found plenty of universities which don't require a foundation course and even some 4-year courses which have the foundation included. Although admittedly you've got me thinking now...


Another complication is I'm not entirely sure if I want to do Fine Art or Film & Television so I'm applying to some of each, my personal statement covering both courses (doesn't sound too promising I know but my head of year has assured me it's good and shouldn't be a problem). I feel like doing an Art foundation course would be a huge commitment as I don't want to apply for that and then come September 2014 decide I'd have rather done F&T at university.


Thanks for the info but I'll have to some thinking!
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Ralph900)
I thought about doing a foundation course but what with it being another year before I could go to uni I decided against it. I've found plenty of universities which don't require a foundation course and even some 4-year courses which have the foundation included. Although admittedly you've got me thinking now...


Another complication is I'm not entirely sure if I want to do Fine Art or Film & Television so I'm applying to some of each, my personal statement covering both courses (doesn't sound too promising I know but my head of year has assured me it's good and shouldn't be a problem). I feel like doing an Art foundation course would be a huge commitment as I don't want to apply for that and then come September 2014 decide I'd have rather done F&T at university.


Thanks for the info but I'll have to some thinking!
I'd urge a foundation course. Remember that even at universities which don't absolutely require one (and most of the best ones do) you will be competing with a majority of students who have done one and whose portfolios will be the better for it. It's free if you are under 19.
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Juno
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If you haven't done a foundation course you'll be at a slight disadvantage, so with a muddled personal statement you're really harming your chances. If you do the foundation course you can still apply for a different subject afterwards anyway.


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IvyandRosebuds
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And bare in mind with a foundation course, you'd generally move straight into your second year, so you wouldn't be taking more time to complete your degree if that's your worry.
I'm applying for Art History and the institutions I have spoken to have stressed the importance of a clear and concise personal statement. One in particular suggested it would work in my favour were I to reference particular aspects of their course and why I wanted to study that. So trying to work a personal statement around 2 very different degrees could be really rather difficult.

Surely applying for a 4 year long degree course is a far bigger commitment than a 1 year foundation course, especially when you're not sure? Of course, I'm not trying to put you off applying for what you want to - only you can make that decision. But studying at a higher education institution, whatever the course, is a huge commitment, and it's important you feel confident in your own decision.
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Allie J
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If you're not sure if you want to do Art or Film, do the Art foundation. It's only 1 year as opposed to 3/4 for a full degree and it will show you what an Art degree is like. If you love it, great you've got a much better chance of getting in because you're portfolio will be brilliant. If you don't like it, oh well it's only 1 year, you've still got a foundation degree qualification and you can apply for Film instead. It makes sense to do a foundation
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Nonel
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(Original post by IvyandRosebuds)
And bare in mind with a foundation course, you'd generally move straight into your second year, so you wouldn't be taking more time to complete your degree if that's your worry.
uh, no. A foundation course is a requirement (except in very exceptional circumstances) for first-year entry into any art-based course worth going to.
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Nonel)
uh, no. A foundation course is a requirement (except in very exceptional circumstances) for first-year entry into any art-based course worth going to.
You can be admitted into the second year of Scottish art degrees with an art foundation. It's the norm for English and Welsh students going to Scotland.
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Nonel
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(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
You can be admitted into the second year of Scottish art degrees with an art foundation. It's the norm for English and Welsh students going to Scotland.
Ah fair enough, I wasn't aware of that. Aren't Scottish art courses 4 years anyway?
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Nonel)
Ah fair enough, I wasn't aware of that. Aren't Scottish art courses 4 years anyway?
Yes, so you are still doing 3 years, but it's important that people know that they should apply for second year if they have an art foundation. Sometimes people don't realise.
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Caroline680
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(Original post by Nonel)
uh, no. A foundation course is a requirement (except in very exceptional circumstances) for first-year entry into any art-based course worth going to.
A lot less these days actually, esp. as lots of Uni's are now not offering the course anymore. Some of the ones I have applied to dont even mention having to have done one.. if you know what course you want to do and are at a high enough standard then you may as well go straight into doing a degree
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Caroline680)
A lot less these days actually, esp. as lots of Uni's are now not offering the course anymore. Some of the ones I have applied to dont even mention having to have done one.. if you know what course you want to do and are at a high enough standard then you may as well go straight into doing a degree
You will be at a disadvantage against people who have done one, whose portfolios will be much more focused and developed.
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Nonel
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(Original post by Caroline680)
A lot less these days actually, esp. as lots of Uni's are now not offering the course anymore. Some of the ones I have applied to dont even mention having to have done one.. if you know what course you want to do and are at a high enough standard then you may as well go straight into doing a degree
If you're gonna study fine art at degree level then you really have to live and breathe the subject, because lets admit, it's not the best course available in terms of job opportunities. So why wouldn't you want to study it for an extra year for free? Your work really evolves in that year and you'll be so much more sure where you want your practise to go.

Also, and I hate to say this, there's not really much point going to a uni that doesn't ask for a foundation because it probably won't be worth going to. Like I say, a fine art course is a great way to cut your future job opportunities in half in the future, so go to one worth going to minimise your losses, so to speak. I'm saying this as a fine art student myself!
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Nonel)
If you're gonna study fine art at degree level then you really have to live and breathe the subject, because lets admit, it's not the best course available in terms of job opportunities. So why wouldn't you want to study it for an extra year for free? Your work really evolves in that year and you'll be so much more sure where you want your practise to go.

Also, and I hate to say this, there's not really much point going to a uni that doesn't ask for a foundation because it probably won't be worth going to. Like I say, a fine art course is a great way to cut your future job opportunities in half in the future, so go to one worth going to minimise your losses, so to speak. I'm saying this as a fine art student myself!
I agree with everything you say, as the mother of a postgrad art student.
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