Turn on thread page Beta

Do you ever find that doctors or specialists don't explain their advice to you? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Do you ever find that doctors or specialists don't explain their advice to you?

    They'll say "don't do this", and "do that" but on a few occasions, they don't explain why. Like we're supposed to know how they are thinking medically? Next time I'm at the doctors, I have to be more assertive with my questions.

    I don't know if it's because they think we won't understand or if they aren't bothered.
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Jem12)
    Do you ever find that doctors or specialists don't explain their advice to you?

    They'll say "don't do this", and "do that" but on a few occasions, they don't explain why. Like we're supposed to know how they are thinking medically? Next time I'm at the doctors, I have to be more assertive with my questions.

    I don't know if it's because they think we won't understand or if they aren't bothered.
    Yep. My former GP was terrible for that. He once wanted me to take antidepressants. I asked him how they'd work, how they would affect me, and what the potential side-effects were. He responded with, "Just take them." I asked again, and explained that I really wanted to know, because I'd never taken anything like it before. His answer - "You wouldn't understand anyway, so there's no point explaining." Sounded really ticked off, too, that I didn't just go with it.

    He got even more ticked off when I stood my ground (politely) and eventually he grabbed this book, flicked through it all irritable and slammed it on the table for me to read. I did understand what it said and didn't like the sound of them. I'd only wanted some advice on how to improve my confidence levels and self-esteem... I wanted to tackle the root of the problem rather than masking it, so I decided against taking them. It was as though I'd committed a crime, though, the way he reacted.

    Luckily, I now have a very kind GP who actually listens and takes time to explain things. I hardly ever go to the doctor (last time was back in April), but when I do, it's important to have someone like that.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's a combination of things it's definitely not just 'oh they will never understand'.

    Time constraints, they couldn't very well go about explaining the scientific ins and outs of their advice to every person who visits

    Maybe specialist knowledge, it might be too complex for a non-physician and therefore pointless trying to explain to someone who isn't in the profession

    They might not be allowed to talk to patients about certain matters

    It might do you more harm than good, as in might worry you unnecessarily

    But there's no harm in pressing an issue if you are particularly interested worst that could happen is they brush it off or say sorry I can't discuss that
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I had a doctor who would make awkward jokes to get around questions lol, one time he was examining my chest and goes "just making sure you arent leaking"

    I laughed nervously but thought it was rather odd, at any case it shut me up lol.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kittiara)
    His answer - "You wouldn't understand anyway, so there's no point explaining." Sounded really ticked off, too, that I didn't just go with it.

    He got even more ticked off when I stood my ground (politely) and eventually he grabbed this book, flicked through it all irritable and slammed it on the table for me to read. I did understand what it said and didn't like the sound of them. I'd only wanted some advice on how to improve my confidence levels and self-esteem... I wanted to tackle the root of the problem rather than masking it, so I decided against taking them. It was as though I'd committed a crime, though, the way he reacted.
    .
    Ok what I said clearly isn't the worst that can happen...

    Well done for standing your ground and most importantly changing doctors!
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by Ebony19)
    I think it's a combination of things it's definitely not just 'oh they will never understand'.

    Time constraints, they couldn't very well go about explaining the scientific ins and outs of their advice to every person who visits
    Obviously I can't speak for others; but if I ask a question, I just want the basics. I am not expecting the scientific ins and outs.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by OU Student)
    Obviously I can't speak for others; but if I ask a question, I just want the basics. I am not expecting the scientific ins and outs.
    Calm. That was obviously an exaggeration. And I think I do speak for others when I say that was clear. It was a manner of speaking rather than a reality.

    For those that didn't quite catch the point a rewording:

    If you ask a question in a GP consultation time constraints might mean the doctor can't go to lengths explaining reasoning whether its scientific or otherwise.

    + the other things I said
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Ebony19)
    Ok what I said clearly isn't the worst that can happen...

    Well done for standing your ground and most importantly changing doctors!
    Thanks . I understand that a GP can't go into overly lengthy, complicated explanations, but I like to have at least some understanding of treatments, what I'm putting into my body and why. I guess I am a difficult customer in some sense, but that's only because I've had very bad physical reactions in the past when taking medication, so I have to be careful. I also don't like taking medication when it's not absolutely necessary.

    I'm really glad I changed doctors. I don't even have to ask my new doctor to explain things - she just does it, and makes sure I am fine with it! The downside (if it can be called such) is that she always runs late, but that's what you get with someone who takes her time with her patients and I don't mind it.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kittiara)
    Thanks . I understand that a GP can't go into overly lengthy, complicated explanations, but I like to have at least some understanding of treatments, what I'm putting into my body and why. I guess I am a difficult customer in some sense, but that's only because I've had very bad physical reactions in the past when taking medication, so I have to be careful. I also don't like taking medication when it's not absolutely necessary.

    I'm really glad I changed doctors. I don't even have to ask my new doctor to explain things - she just does it, and makes sure I am fine with it! The downside (if it can be called such) is that she always runs late, but that's what you get with someone who takes her time with her patients and I don't mind it.
    Happy to say I'm that difficult customer too, I think it's important to be that way if need be to make sure you really aren't taking unnecessary medications etc like you say.

    I had to change doctors a few times before the doctor I'm with now who I feel 'compatible' with. I think like you say a marker of a good doctor is a caring one. Still we have to remember their restraints and if need be press an issue if it's important to us because they might not recognise our concerns even if they are caring etc.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    As a medical student this disgusts me about senior doctors today - it's a key part of autonomy which if something goes wrong probably could result in lawsuits.

    I support doctors giving an honest opinion, such as, the previous patient is doing better with radio than chemo - as long as you don't give them false hope.

    Poor, lazy communication from senior doctors is an unfortunate part of the health service
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Ebony19)
    Happy to say I'm that difficult customer too, I think it's important to be that way if need be to make sure you really aren't taking unnecessary medications etc like you say.

    I had to change doctors a few times before the doctor I'm with now who I feel 'compatible' with. I think like you say a marker of a good doctor is a caring one. Still we have to remember their restraints and if need be press an issue if it's important to us because they might not recognise our concerns even if they are caring etc.
    Aye, I fully agree with you! Our doctors can't read our minds, so we need to communicate with them. And perhaps they're having a bad day, which happens to everyone, so they may not always be at their best.

    I'm glad you found a doctor you're compatible with as well! It's so important to feel at ease when you're explaining your problems, and to know that you're in safe hands, or safe as can be .
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    In my experience, 95% of patients don't particularly care how insert-drug-name-here works. But that said, when patients do ask, it's usually happily explained (albeit in simplified ways).

    (Original post by Ebony19)
    They might not be allowed to talk to patients about certain matters

    But there's no harm in pressing an issue if you are particularly interested worst that could happen is they brush it off or say sorry I can't discuss that
    I certainly don't know of anything that doctors aren't allowed to discuss with their patients. After all, it's your body and you deserve to know what you're putting in it!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiggydiggy)
    I certainly don't know of anything that doctors aren't allowed to discuss with their patients. After all, it's your body and you deserve to know what you're putting in it!
    I didn't mean a general discussion I meant there are probably things they're not allowed to discuss. I wasn't suggesting they manage to gauge what's wrong with the person without even talking to them... come on now
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ebony19)
    I didn't mean a general discussion I meant there are problem things they're not allowed to discuss. I wasn't suggesting they manage to gauge what's wrong with the person without even talking to them... come on now
    I have no idea what you just said.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    If it's a consultation about your health then they should make sure that before you've left that room that you understand what's going on and why they're taking the route of treatment they're following.

    There is never any harm in asking a doctor what they just said, or asking them to simplify what they've said (I think a lot of people who work in healthcare suffer from speaking the language), in the end, we all want patients to understand what's going on so that they can give informed consent. Quite often I spend time in my role as a critical care nurse having to explain stuff, that's not because of doctors or other staff are wanting to withhold information, but sometimes (especially when it's life changing information) it doesn't all get through at first.

    If you don't understand, then please ask, we'd rather people knew what was going on than be left in the dark and worrying.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiggydiggy)
    I have no idea what you just said.
    mistake...
    problem was meant to be probably
    sense?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: November 15, 2013
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.