Why are calculators not allowed in C1? Watch

WGR
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I can understand GCSE maths because that's (mostly) everyday maths but A level? If you're in any situation where you had to use arithmetic series or differentiation you would certainly have a calculator to hand. I feel that they should spend more time teaching the concept rather than pointless number crunching by that stage. I rant because when i did my C1 many years ago I bombed out purely because I goofed up some long multiplication. I understood the concept of the question perfectly I just couldn't do that sum so had to leave the question. When I was allowed a calculator in C2,3 and 4 my marks shot up into the 90s. maybe it's just me but any maths concept I cna handle but I've always struggled with number crunching (long division etc) I don't see why i should have been held back at such an advanced level by that especially when it's totally obsolete nowadays. Simple times table stuff yes but long division/multiplication on paper? No one will ever need to do that in this age of transistors.
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placenta medicae talpae
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If you want an A Level in maths, then you really ought to be able to do basic arithmetic in your head or on paper.

Not necessarily at lightning speed, and of course doing mega multiplications doesn't make you good at maths, but you still ought to be able to demonstrate the skill, in the same way that you need to demonstrate that you can differentiate something without e.g. the help of Wolfram Alpha.
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techno-thriller
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Dude, they're not needed. Its basic math.
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techno-thriller
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PS if you can't do multiplication then you don't deserve to do C1
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Architecture-er
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(Original post by WGR)
I can understand GCSE maths because that's (mostly) everyday maths but A level? If you're in any situation where you had to use arithmetic series or differentiation you would certainly have a calculator to hand. I feel that they should spend more time teaching the concept rather than pointless number crunching by that stage. I rant because when i did my C1 many years ago I bombed out purely because I goofed up some long multiplication. I understood the concept of the question perfectly I just couldn't do that sum so had to leave the question. When I was allowed a calculator in C2,3 and 4 my marks shot up into the 90s. maybe it's just me but any maths concept I cna handle but I've always struggled with number crunching (long division etc) I don't see why i should have been held back at such an advanced level by that especially when it's totally obsolete nowadays. Simple times table stuff yes but long division/multiplication on paper? No one will ever need to do that in this age of transistors.
It's because you're not actually tested on arithmetic. The majority of calculations will involve letters rather than numbers, or calculations simple enough to perform without a calculator. Look at past papers and you won't find a single one that has an answer with complex decimal places, in some ways it helps you because (if you find yourself needing a calculator to work out a horrible division sum) then you'll have gone wrong somewhere
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the bear
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it is like asking why do people still play acoustic guitars when they have spiffing electronic ones... maths unplugged is epic
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ChocoholicCox
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(Original post by WGR)
I can understand GCSE maths because that's (mostly) everyday maths but A level? If you're in any situation where you had to use arithmetic series or differentiation you would certainly have a calculator to hand. I feel that they should spend more time teaching the concept rather than pointless number crunching by that stage. I rant because when i did my C1 many years ago I bombed out purely because I goofed up some long multiplication. I understood the concept of the question perfectly I just couldn't do that sum so had to leave the question. When I was allowed a calculator in C2,3 and 4 my marks shot up into the 90s. maybe it's just me but any maths concept I cna handle but I've always struggled with number crunching (long division etc) I don't see why i should have been held back at such an advanced level by that especially when it's totally obsolete nowadays. Simple times table stuff yes but long division/multiplication on paper? No one will ever need to do that in this age of transistors.
Im doing c1 at the moment and its not that hard equations all which a normal person could do in there head :P
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WGR
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(Original post by placenta medicae talpae)
If you want an A Level in maths, then you really ought to be able to do basic arithmetic in your head or on paper.

Not necessarily at lightning speed, and of course doing mega multiplications doesn't make you good at maths, but you still ought to be able to demonstrate the skill, in the same way that you need to demonstrate that you can differentiate something without e.g. the help of Wolfram Alpha.

I get what you're saying but the time to teach the concept of long multiplication was in primary school. Sixth form is where you teach the concept of differentiation so that you must do by hand. I am all for teaching the concept of long multiplication because it's at the heart of maths but there's really no need to actually make you use it once you've learnt the concept.


(Original post by techno-thriller)
PS if you can't do multiplication then you don't deserve to do C1
I got an A so you can't say I shouldn't have been doing it.



(Original post by the bear)
it is like asking why do people still play acoustic guitars when they have spiffing electronic ones... maths unplugged is epic
That makes no sense whatsoever. People play acoustic guitar for the sound not because it's harder.




Answer me this. If long division/multiplication is so essential that we must make kids do it even in C1 then why are we allowed calculators in subsequent maths papers? Looks to me like it's just thrown in to make the paper harder because it's too easy compared to the others. Wouldn't it be more useful to make the paper harder by throwing in harder concepts rather than just more tedious number crunching?
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the bear
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number crunching is not tedious... it is fun
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ninuzu
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C1 is a piece of piss, mate...
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ElChapo
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The study of maths isn't limited to what you will need in everyday life by any stretch of the imagination, so just because you may never need to crunch numbers in your everyday life, doesn't mean it won't be tested.
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username418231
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Because the type of questions you do in C1 are the type of questions you are supposed to work out in your head.
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nic-nac
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C1 doesn't involve maths that needs a calculator. If you feel the need to use a calculator for c1 then you probably shouldn't be doing a-level maths.
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felamaslen
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(Original post by WGR)
I can understand GCSE maths because that's (mostly) everyday maths but A level? If you're in any situation where you had to use arithmetic series or differentiation you would certainly have a calculator to hand. I feel that they should spend more time teaching the concept rather than pointless number crunching by that stage. I rant because when i did my C1 many years ago I bombed out purely because I goofed up some long multiplication. I understood the concept of the question perfectly I just couldn't do that sum so had to leave the question. When I was allowed a calculator in C2,3 and 4 my marks shot up into the 90s. maybe it's just me but any maths concept I cna handle but I've always struggled with number crunching (long division etc) I don't see why i should have been held back at such an advanced level by that especially when it's totally obsolete nowadays. Simple times table stuff yes but long division/multiplication on paper? No one will ever need to do that in this age of transistors.
What about arithmetic series or differentiation implies or warrants the usage of an electronic calculator? They both pre-date (by a long, long way) the discovery of electricity, for instance. And it's ironic that you call for less number crunching - I would agree with you, numeric calculations are not required in mathematics - and yet wish to be able to use the tool which was invented for laborious number crunching!

Never forget your basic principles. We should all be able to survive without our advanced inventions if need be. Every human being worth their salt should know some basic long division and multiplication, fractions and curve sketching. It's part and parcel of being an intelligent, able-minded sentient being, rather than a drone and a waste of space.
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WGR
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Ok this thread is full of angry maths nerds so I'm out.
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WGR
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(Original post by Peter91)
What's the point in asking if you only want answers that agree with you?
What is a rhetorical question?
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WGR
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(Original post by Peter91)
Sure, but you posted in a forum, then got frustrated when people replied, abandoning the thread you started, with a lovely bit of ad hominem on the way out.
Because you all started attacking me by saying I was just too dumb to do C1. This is not constructive.
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Felix Felicis
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To make it half-challenging.
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CasualSoul
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(Original post by WGR)
Ok this thread is full of angry maths nerds so I'm out.
gone to get your calculator?





only joking
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PG593
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Because none of the material covered needs a calculator, your human brain should more than enough to compute the basic algebra/numeracy involved.
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