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    If you suspected you had a mental illness which would affect your chances of getting your dream job would you go to the doctor about it?

    Leaving this intentionally open to interpretation and discussion about how much it would affect the job, type of illness, etc.
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    When I was a kid all I wanted to do was join the army. However, I did reach out for help knowing it would throw away any chance of achieving my dream. Sometimes I still wish I hadn't seen a doctor but then I think about it and well, I probably wouldn't be here to join the army if I hadn't got help. And anyway, if I'm struggling with daily life, I'd probably struggle a lot more if put in a war zone or under any other large amount of stress so it's probably for the best.

    At the moment I want to be a police officer, however, I know the longer my mental health issues go on the higher the chance that I'll never achieve that either. Yet I'm still seeing my psychiatrist and still getting help even knowing that it's hurting my chances.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If you suspected you had a mental illness which would affect your chances of getting your dream job would you go to the doctor about it?

    Leaving this intentionally open to interpretation and discussion about how much it would affect the job, type of illness, etc.
    Yes, for are only a handful of jobs where having a mental illness . In fact, I can't think of any job where having any mental illness a bar to entry. Not even the army.

    The same goes for physical illness' (as there are physical illness, such as epilepsy, which can also affect entry into certain jobs). You are not going to get better unless you seek medical treatment. Performing the duties of the job can be both physically and mentally stressful and can not just negatively affect your own health, but can also put yourself and your colleagues at great risk.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Yes, for are only a handful of jobs where having a mental illness . In fact, I can't think of any job where having any mental illness a bar to entry. Not even the army.

    The same goes for physical illness' (as there are physical illness, such as epilepsy, which can also affect entry into certain jobs). You are not going to get better unless you seek medical treatment. Performing the duties of the job can be both physically and mentally stressful and can not just negatively affect your own health, but can also put yourself and your colleagues at great risk.
    Whilst few jobs have mental health restrictions such as the army many more are effected by mental health discrimination which, whilst wrong, is prominent in today's society. If you look at some of these stats they show a lot of stigmatisation still.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Whilst few jobs have mental health restrictions such as the army many more are effected by mental health discrimination which, whilst wrong, is prominent in today's society. If you look at some of these stats they show a lot of stigmatisation still.
    I have epilepsy which, although I realise isn't a mental health condition, still carries significant perceived and "real" stigma, as much as many mental health conditions. But I also have a mental health condition in addition to epilepsy anyway, so I'm quite familiar with stigma and discrimination.

    But you are not obliged to disclose you have a mental health condition for the majority of jobs. Certain jobs will require an occupational health check but is only done in order to determine fitness for the job and reasonable adjustments/support. If you do disclose, and are discriminated against, then this is illegal. Admittedly it can sometimes be difficult to prove discrimination.

    And the link doesn't work as it requires a log in. However, I'm familiar with academic research and both mental and physical health conditions anyway (having chosen epilepsy and its stigma, both perceived and enacted, as my dissertation topic when doing my BA.
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    (Original post by River85)
    I have epilepsy which, although I realise isn't a mental health condition, still carries significant perceived and "real" stigma, as much as many mental health conditions. But I also have a mental health condition in addition to epilepsy anyway, so I'm quite familiar with stigma and discrimination.

    But you are not obliged to disclose you have a mental health condition for the majority of jobs. Certain jobs will require an occupational health check but is only done in order to determine fitness for the job and reasonable adjustments/support. If you do disclose, and are discriminated against, then this is illegal. Admittedly it can sometimes be difficult to prove discrimination.

    And the link doesn't work as it requires a log in. However, I'm familiar with academic research and both mental and physical health conditions anyway (having chosen epilepsy and its stigma, both perceived and enacted, as my dissertation topic when doing my BA.
    Is there not a double tick initiative in which companies are obliged to give the disabled an interview for the position?
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    (Original post by Rational Thinker)
    Is there not a double tick initiative in which companies are obliged to give the disabled an interview for the position?
    If they meet the essential criteria, yes, though the majority of employers aren't two ticks employers. It's awarded by Jobcentre Plus to employers who make specific pledges such as having a discussion at least once a year with disabled employees to discuss support, to take all appropriate and reasonable steps to increase disability awareness, and so on.
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    (Original post by River85)
    If they meet the essential criteria, yes, though the majority of employers aren't two ticks employers. It's awarded by Jobcentre Plus to employers who make specific pledges such as having a discussion at least once a year with disabled employees to discuss support, to take all appropriate and reasonable steps to increase disability awareness, and so on.
    I think we are sadly going to see more and more marginalisation of the disabled and time continues.
 
 
 
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