Prospective mature nursing student Watch

justastudent123
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hi everyone

First post here so hope its not too bombarding

I'm soon to be 24, been in full time employment the last 3.5 years. Aiming to start nursing next september ideally - unsure of university of specific course yet.

Mainly i was wondering if theres anywhere to contact for general advice and guidance in my position, or even specific nursing related advice, or would i need to select and contact a specific university i was interested in to get that sort of information

I'm currently renting a flat which takes a large chunk of my full time wage along with my partners [also in full time work and will remain so].

Am i going to be eligable for any sort of funding or grants during the 3 years course duration, and does savings in the bank have any affect on this:confused:

Thanks for any help and advice
0
reply
roobie72
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
Hi

I'm a 40 year old mature nursing student, just started my first year. Just thought I'd chip in with what I learned from the application process:

Think about what branch of nursing you would like to go into - adult, child, learning disability or mental health? Some universities don't always offer all 4 branches.

Draw up a list of the universities you like the look of and look at their websites. Contact them and see if you can attend open days. You'll get a better feel of the place once you have a look around. The course content is pretty much the same no matter what uni you go to but the way they coordinate lectures and placements vary.

Financially, you will be able to apply for a student loan and bursary. How much you get depends on your circumstances. They are means tested so your savings and partner's finances will be taken into consideration. At present, the government pays for nursing students' tuition fees so that's one less thing to worry about.

Do you have any kind of care experience? If not, it might be a good idea to look into getting some. It will stand you in good stead for interview and for when you start your degree.

How's your maths and English? A GCSE grade C minimum is required for all nursing courses. They will test your literacy and numeracy at interview.

Good luck!

Roo
0
reply
justastudent123
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
Hi

Thanks very much for the reply that was really helpful.

I'm still deciding whether i want to do adult or mental health at the moment, but swinging more towards adult just as theres a wider spectrum of jobs i can go off into at the end of it, and i believe you can do a 1.5 year 'top up' course into mental health should i ever really wish to do that further down the line which wouldn't be too bad if i'm correct on that.

Universities wise i've got a list of about 5 in reasonable distance from where i am at the moment, and they all are providing suitable courses from when i last checked at least.

Regarding the finances, is there a way to find out how much i will qualify for [hopefully a semi-decent amount at the least or it may stop the whole plan, which would be gutting]. Or do i need to get to the stage of applying for a specific uni in order to contact the relevant people and check the financial side in more detail.

I've got nearly 4 years experience in general care homes, dementia care homes and an EMI unit also so i'm hoping that will be of benefit. Also have NVQ 3 in Health and social and C's in the maths and english [although thats many years back, so i may need to do a test still i presume].

Thanks again for the help and advice =]
0
reply
Bubble87
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
If you google NHSBSA and then go the section on students and bursaries there is an entitlement calculator that will give you a rough estimate. It isn't very accurate though! Everyone is entitled to a £1000 grant (paid monthly) and anything on top of that depends on your circumstances. They will take savings into consideration and you have to provide evidence for this but the earnings threshold in terms of your partner is relatively high. You are also entitled to a reduced maintenance loan from student finance of around £2300 per year (paid in 3 instalments at the start of each semester).

You've got loads of experience so no problems there and hospitals are always happy to take on student nurses as bank HCAs so you will be able to make some extra money that way.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
sparkles83
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
Hi, I've just turned 30 and hoping to be a student (again) i was originally accepted but had to withdraw after 18 months. It sounds like you have alot of care experience and also good grades so you stand a good chance.
0
reply
dg2009
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
How do people afford to study nursing? I think I'll get around £77488 - £649 a month (45 week course) but are you able, can you manage to get agency/bank ok? I'd need around 5 a month (long shifts) to cover all my bills etc.
0
reply
Rebjayal
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by dg2009)
How do people afford to study nursing? I think I'll get around £77488 - £649 a month (45 week course) but are you able, can you manage to get agency/bank ok? I'd need around 5 a month (long shifts) to cover all my bills etc.
Look into doing waking night shifts at a care home or supported living. Pay is crap but mine are 10hr shifts and can fit placements around them.
0
reply
deviant182
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
waking nights can be very helpful if you are allowed to take your work to do in between checking patients / clients. I was able to do this in my previous job in supported living while doing my nvq.
Im applying to go back to nursing next year and currently working my butt of trying to save some money should i get accepted And also got a couple of handy books already and luckily i have relatives in nursing who can help with books equipment and studying.

The grant and the bursary etc may hep, but if youre looking to apply start saving as soon as possible, a little less worry if you have some savings in the bank!
0
reply
dg2009
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by deviant182)
waking nights can be very helpful if you are allowed to take your work to do in between checking patients / clients. I was able to do this in my previous job in supported living while doing my nvq.
Im applying to go back to nursing next year and currently working my butt of trying to save some money should i get accepted And also got a couple of handy books already and luckily i have relatives in nursing who can help with books equipment and studying.

The grant and the bursary etc may hep, but if youre looking to apply start saving as soon as possible, a little less worry if you have some savings in the bank!
I used to do that at a home I used to work at but I don't do well on nights, I don't sleep much during the day and I'm usually useless the day before and after lol

I know I'll be able to manage with the loans/grants and a few agency shifts etc I'd just have to cut back a bit for the time being.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of West London
    Postgraduate Open Day - Ealing Site Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Jun '19
  • University of Warwick
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Jun '19
  • University of Bath
    Find out about life at the University and discover our diverse range of Undergraduate courses. Our course areas include the Sciences, Humanities & Social Sciences, Engineering & Design, and Management. Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Jun '19

How did your AQA A-level Chemistry Paper 3 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (206)
32.75%
The paper was reasonable (307)
48.81%
Not feeling great about that exam... (71)
11.29%
It was TERRIBLE (45)
7.15%

Watched Threads

View All