Am I too late? What do I need to study Psychology at uni? Watch

Charlotte Turton
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I'm currently in yr12. I achieved high results at GCSE but until recently I had no idea what I wanted to study at university or which career path I wanted to follow after completing a degree. So when I picked my A-levels I went for subjects I liked/was good at, tried to keep my options open. I took Maths, Economics, French and English Lit.

I've recently discovered a subject I have a passion for and would love to become a Clinical Psychologist. However I didn't take any sciences at A-level and it's too late for me to change my subjects. I've read that most universities 'strongly recommend' a Biology A-level at least for prospective psychology students.

Am I still eligible to study psychology at a good (preferably a top) university? If so, what work experience do you recommend? How can I maximise my chances of acceptance? Where do you recommend studying psychology?

Help would be very much appreciated - sorry for all the questions!
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Interrobang
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(Original post by Charlotte Turton)
I'm currently in yr12. I achieved high results at GCSE but until recently I had no idea what I wanted to study at university or which career path I wanted to follow after completing a degree. So when I picked my A-levels I went for subjects I liked/was good at, tried to keep my options open. I took Maths, Economics, French and English Lit.

I've recently discovered a subject I have a passion for and would love to become a Clinical Psychologist. However I didn't take any sciences at A-level and it's too late for me to change my subjects. I've read that most universities 'strongly recommend' a Biology A-level at least for prospective psychology students.

Am I still eligible to study psychology at a good (preferably a top) university? If so, what work experience do you recommend? How can I maximise my chances of acceptance? Where do you recommend studying psychology?

Help would be very much appreciated - sorry for all the questions!
Maths is counted as a science, so you've got one You don't need work experience but you do need to show your interest through extra reading around psychology or other similar things
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Charlotte Turton
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(Original post by *Interrobang*)
Maths is counted as a science, so you've got one You don't need work experience but you do need to show your interest through extra reading around psychology or other similar things

Ahh, alright then. Thank you for the reply
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Lord Asriel
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I've recently discovered a subject I have a passion for and would love to become a Clinical Psychologist. However I didn't take any sciences at A-level and it's too late for me to change my subjects. I've read that most universities 'strongly recommend' a Biology A-level at least for prospective psychology students.
While it's good to have a science subject at A-level, especially as statistics and research methods is such an integral part to both undergrad psychology, as well as postgrad training, you don't need to have a specific A-level. What is important though is your ability to think "scientifically" (i.e. methodically, using deduction, hypothesis testing etc) which is integral to the work we do. Many of the people on my clinical training postgrads had non science A-levels, but were able to pick up the essentials as they gathered academic experience and qualifications at university.

Am I still eligible to study psychology at a good (preferably a top) university? If so, what work experience do you recommend? How can I maximise my chances of acceptance? Where do you recommend studying psychology?

At undergraduate level you need to put together good evidence that you can perform academically, and that you are enthusiastic about the subject. For postgraduate training courses (e.g. clinical psychology which is another 3 years on top of your undergrad),It matters more that you do well in your course rather than where you actually get your degree from. but you will need to have a strong mix of academic and clinical experience. There is no one right way to get the latter, but you can read the FAQ I wrote that I link in my sig to get an idea of what people often do.
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Charlotte Turton
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
While it's good to have a science subject at A-level, especially as statistics and research methods is such an integral part to both undergrad psychology, as well as postgrad training, you don't need to have a specific A-level. What is important though is your ability to think "scientifically" (i.e. methodically, using deduction, hypothesis testing etc) which is integral to the work we do. Many of the people on my clinical training postgrads had non science A-levels, but were able to pick up the essentials as they gathered academic experience and qualifications at university.

Am I still eligible to study psychology at a good (preferably a top) university? If so, what work experience do you recommend? How can I maximise my chances of acceptance? Where do you recommend studying psychology?

At undergraduate level you need to put together good evidence that you can perform academically, and that you are enthusiastic about the subject. For postgraduate training courses (e.g. clinical psychology which is another 3 years on top of your undergrad),It matters more that you do well in your course rather than where you actually get your degree from. but you will need to have a strong mix of academic and clinical experience. There is no one right way to get the latter, but you can read the FAQ I wrote that I link in my sig to get an idea of what people often do.
Alright, thank you very much for your advice, I'll check out the link One worry I had is that it's an area which isn't easy to get hold of work experience in, in addition to being a rather competitive field.
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Lord Asriel
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One worry I had is that it's an area which isn't easy to get hold of work experience in, in addition to being a rather competitive field.
While I agree it is competitive, relevant work experience can be obtained in a variety of different ways. You can be start off as a support worker or similar entry level post. While these aren't typical graduate jobs, they are rewarding in their own way and you can learn a lot from them about life in general.
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By the way, I think you shouldn't worry about not being prepared for psychology, I think maths will be great for stats and english lit might be useful for writing essays good luck!
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PinkFreud
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Hey,
I was in your boat a couple of years back, I didn't have a clue what I wanted to do! I'm now a final year psychology student and i'm in love with my course. I took Biology, Chemistry, English Lit and Psychology at A-Level and when I applied my high predicted grades in psychology were a major factor towards getting an offer but it's not essential. Most universities will ask for a science-y subject and you're lucky as maths falls into this category and universities tend to like maths in applicants. I have got some advice for you though:

a.) Check carefully when applying to universities if the Psychology course is accredited by the BPS, some universities aren't and this could hinder you later on.
b.) Your personal statement is a big selling point, make sure it's not laborious and give it a bit of jazz.
c.) Look at the course content when applying and not the university itself, some courses focus more on Research and Statistics which is favourable for a career in clinical psychology.

I think as long as you have decent grades and a catchy personal statement you'll be fine. Hope i've helped!
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