A mistake by England to go down the foreign manager route? Watch

Aky786UK
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Just intrigued by comments in another thread about England should be managed by an English manager and that other lesser countries had adopted coaches from their own nationality than going abroad.

So, did we make a mistake going down the foreign manager route by appointing Eriksson in 2000? And then Capello in 2008?

I'd have to say, we probably did considering the lack of success we had both managers. But the real mistake I think was not appointing an international manager. Someone, like Guus Hiddink for example, who has been a national coach and experience in that field.

Crozier went for Eriksson because he was a highly rated coach after his success with Lazio and that bald FA chief executive (Brian Barwick) went for Capello because it was time for some discipline which worked to some extent.

Also the wages spent out on both of them doesn't help.

I'd rather have crashed out of the WC at QF stages with an English coach than a foreign one but I guess there wasn't a massive depth in coaches ready to take over.

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nixonsjellybeans
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Doesn't make a difference to me in the slightest. I'd rather have had Sven and Capello than some of the tosh English managers about.
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martin jol
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(Original post by Aky786UK)
I'd rather have crashed out of the WC at QF stages with an English coach than a foreign one but I guess there wasn't a massive depth in coaches ready to take over.

Thoughts?
I don't understand why people are so disgusted by the prospect of going out in the quarters. If anything, for a nation of England's size, it's an overachievement.
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Kutta
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Other countries have talented managers, England do not really have talented managers, i mean is Brendan Rogers (top British manger in the league in terms of league position) really comparably to Del Bosque or Low?
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Aky786UK
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(Original post by martin jol)
I don't understand why people are so disgusted by the prospect of going out in the quarters. If anything, for a nation of England's size, it's an overachievement.
Media hype I guess helps to build expectations. In 2006, a QF exit was poor considering the squad we had and we should have progressed. And maybe we would had Rooney not get sent off or we'd overcome our nightmare penalty scenarios.

A QF next year will be an over-achievement considering the lack of excitement of how well England will do and playing in Brazil and the other quality teams but in 2006, it should have been a semi final place.
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bluester
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I remember when Sven left and everyone made a fuss over how the next manager must be English

we ended up not qualifying for the euros under Steve McLaren

whilst an English manager is preferable, the priority is that the manager can get the team winning games, not his nationality
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Mr Smurf
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(Original post by martin jol)
I don't understand why people are so disgusted by the prospect of going out in the quarters. If anything, for a nation of England's size, it's an overachievement.
Population is only one factor. It's also about the level of interest in the sport and resources available. If going out in the quarters of a World Cup is an over achievement for England then Spain, Italy or Argentina going further must be some kind of divine intervention.
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martin jol
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(Original post by Mr Smurf)
Population is only one factor. It's also about the level of interest in the sport and resources available. If going out in the quarters of a World Cup is an over achievement for England then Spain, Italy or Argentina going further must be some kind of divine intervention.
are you serious? football is absolutely ****ing massive in those countries and many, many more with big populations, good infrastructure, coaching, talent etc.

look at the rankings ffs, going by those england should be going out in the round of 16. therefore, quarters are an overachievement and semis are unbelievable.
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Mr Smurf
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(Original post by martin jol)
are you serious? football is absolutely ****ing massive in those countries and many, many more with big populations, good infrastructure, coaching, talent etc.

look at the rankings ffs, going by those england should be going out in the round of 16. therefore, quarters are an overachievement and semis are unbelievable.
Football is massive here and we have a similar population. You said a country of England's size consistently making quarters is an overachievement. It isn't when you compare England to other countries with a similar population and huge level of interest.
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sr90
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(Original post by martin jol)
look at the rankings ffs, going by those england should be going out in the round of 16. therefore, quarters are an overachievement and semis are unbelievable.
The rankings mean **** all.

Brazil weren't even in the top 20 earlier this year, so by your logic they'll be lucky to make it out of the group stages and Colombia/Switzerland should be hoping to win the tournament.
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TRS-T
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Yes. Look at this article which has been in the news today.

England boss Roy Hodgson has revealed that Franz Beckenbauer may have been the key factor in him missing out on becoming Germany's first foreign coach.

Hodgson was approached in 1998 by German Football Association (DFB) president Egidius Braun.

But he said former Germany boss Beckenbauer felt the Englishman would have blocked upcoming German coaches.

"It was an honour when Braun called me," Hodgson told Germany's Bild am Sonntag newspaper.

"I was on the president's wish-list. He would have had problems convincing people to accept a foreign coach though.

"At the time, my friend Franz Beckenbauer pointed out that a foreign coach of the Germany national team would not have helped the German coaching programme - the up-and-coming coaches."

Hodgson, now 66, had led Switzerland to the 1994 World Cup finals and to the 1996 European Championship.

He was manager of Blackburn at the time the job was offered to him.

The DFB decided on Erich Ribbeck to replace Berti Vogts, who resigned following Germany's quarter-final elimination to Croatia at the 1998 World Cup.

Ribbeck, 61 when appointed, did not match Beckenbauer's "up-and-coming" template either, though since his departure two years later, the DFB have appointed young German coaches in Rudi Voller (40 at the time), Jurgen Klinsmann (39) and Joachim Low (46).

Hodgson was sacked by Blackburn in November 1998 and returned for a second spell at Inter Milan, where he was named technical director.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/24979747
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TRS-T
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(Original post by Kutta)
Other countries have talented managers, England do not really have talented managers, i mean is Brendan Rogers (top British manger in the league in terms of league position) really comparably to Del Bosque or Low?
What exactly has Low done to be regarded as a top manager?
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flabbyjoe
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(Original post by TRS-T)
What exactly has Low done to be regarded as a top manager?
Consistently get through to the semi-finals of major international competitions?
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Zürich
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(Original post by TRS-T)
What exactly has Low done to be regarded as a top manager?
Spot on. Inherited the 2nd best team in Europe and finished at best 2nd and last time 4th in the Euros whilst finishing as Semi-finalists in the world cup so at best par.

His club career was also a complete disaster. So...
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TRS-T
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(Original post by flabbyjoe)
Consistently get through to the semi-finals of major international competitions?
Yeah with Germany...
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Kutta
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(Original post by TRS-T)
What exactly has Low done to be regarded as a top manager?
let me rephrase, who would you rather have as England manager?

Low or Rodgers?

Low may have inherited a good team but so did many other managers, it takes a good manager to take a team to the finals and semis in major tournaments. Remember in 2010, that team was meant to be "too young" and was written off by a lot of the pundits.

Low is a good manger and I would love for him to manage England instead of Roy. Saying that, i get your point that he is somewhat unproven and needs continued success to be named great.

If i was part of the FA I would have made Guus Hiddink manger a long time ago.... I reckon England lost the chance to win the WC/Euro when Sven was made manager. He took hold of the "Golden Generation" and failed, If Low / Hiddink was given that responsibility i am sure we would have reached a final at least. I mean dropping Paul Scholes for Lampard and Gerrard is ridiculous, any sane manager would have never done that.
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flabbyjoe
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To be honest, I can only think of 1 country that had a better squad than us during the 2002 world cup. That would be Brazil.
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doggyfizzel
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The England national team for sure needs a revolution, that is unlikely to come from someone who has grow from within the structure of English football, especially in a nation where we are so reluctant to go abroad. Eriksson was okay, his career since how showed how amazing he really was, Capello was again stubborn and stuck in his ways, neither capable of driving some kind of fundamental change. I think we need a coach who has worked top level, but is really a team builder as opposed to a cheque writer from domestic football.
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justanotherposter
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This is why I think Harry Redknapp would have been a disaster as England manager, managing a club where you can buy the players you know will play your style is completely different to managing a nation where you have to work with what you're given. The media needs to get off Hodgson's back, he actually has international experience and gets results. He shouldn't be criticised for losing to Chile, he should be applauded for using friendlies to try out new styles and players, which after all is the only real purpose they serve.
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Mr Smurf
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(Original post by doggyfizzel)
The England national team for sure needs a revolution, that is unlikely to come from someone who has grow from within the structure of English football, especially in a nation where we are so reluctant to go abroad. Eriksson was okay, his career since how showed how amazing he really was, Capello was again stubborn and stuck in his ways, neither capable of driving some kind of fundamental change. I think we need a coach who has worked top level, but is really a team builder as opposed to a cheque writer from domestic football.
Just need coaches to stop obsession over physical ability and "getting stuck in" which leads to young Lee Cattermoles getting ahead over young Michael Carricks.
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