common to do post grad at same uni as UG ? Watch

nic-nac
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
I've gotten to talk to quite a few people doing MSc/MRES/PhDs in my department at my uni, which on the whole is a mid-ranking uni. And almost all of them did their undergrad studies here to. I know a 3rd year on my course who's likely to get a 1st, and is thinking of doing a PhD at Cambridge (her tutor suggested applying) though. My department is above average for my uni, but I am thinking of applying to a certain RG uni to do a masters if I decide to do one. 1) Do many people do their post grad at the same uni?2) Are you more likely to get accepted because they already know you? I didn't like to ask what grade they got in their undergrad except the one applying to Cambridge. 3) Could it be that the others passed, but this uni was the only one they could get into ? or that they really like the uni (I don't really have any other uni to compare it to) 4) I would've thought that if you did well (2:1/1st) you could easily get into a higher ranking uni for post grad studies ?
0
reply
Klix88
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by nic-nac)
1) Do many people do their post grad at the same uni?
It's pretty common. Most unis offer a discount for undergrads who stay on for postgrad, as an incentive.

2) Are you more likely to get accepted because they already know you?
From what I've seen, yes. This especially applies if you have a borderline undergrad result. If you have a 2:2 but it's at the higher end of the range and the staff who know you feel that you are capable of achieving better, then you have an improved chance of acceptance. Unis where you aren't known, may well filter out any application below a 2:1 without further consideration.

3) Could it be that the others passed, but this uni was the only one they could get into ? or that they really like the uni (I don't really have any other uni to compare it to)
Either option is possible. It's equally possible that the uni is simply the best place to follow their personal research interests. I did my Masters at a different uni but went back to my undergrad uni for my PhD, as that's where the expertise and primary research material was available. However I did find it useful to experience a different university as the theoretical approaches to my subject were very different.

4) I would've thought that if you did well (2:1/1st) you could easily get into a higher ranking uni for post grad studies ?
At postgrad level, it's more common to follow your research interests, regardless of perceived status or ranking table placements. For example, my Masters uni was RG - I did a taught Masters in a rather niche subject and that was the only uni in the UK which offered it. My undergrad/PhD uni is a former poly. Oxbridge would have been useless for me at both Masters and PhD level, as the relevant departments don't have a focus on what I want to research.
0
reply
nic-nac
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by Klix88)
It's pretty common. Most unis offer a discount for undergrads who stay on for postgrad, as an incentive.
Fair enough, that may be worth considering then, depending on how much it is.

From what I've seen, yes. This especially applies if you have a borderline undergrad result. If you have a 2:2 but it's at the higher end of the range and the staff who know you feel that you are capable of achieving better, then you have an improved chance of acceptance. Unis where you aren't known, may well filter out any application below a 2:1 without further consideration.
Ah ok, I hope to get a 2:1/1st anyway.


Either option is possible. It's equally possible that the uni is simply the best place to follow their personal research interests. I did my Masters at a different uni but went back to my undergrad uni for my PhD, as that's where the expertise and primary research material was available. However I did find it useful to experience a different university as the theoretical approaches to my subject were very different.
I think my department is quite good on average. However it's quite broad and some unis have a specific department that would probably be better for me.
At postgrad level, it's more common to follow your research interests, regardless of perceived status or ranking table placements. For example, my Masters uni was RG - I did a taught Masters in a rather niche subject and that was the only uni in the UK which offered it. My undergrad/PhD uni is a former poly. Oxbridge would have been useless for me at both Masters and PhD level, as the relevant departments don't have a focus on what I want to research.
I thought so, that is possibly why the post grads are here. Although what I want to do isn't quite what is offered here. But like I said, some unis have departments which are more specific and probably better for me.
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
My son is doing an MA at his undergrad university (Edinburgh) and it's been helpful to him in his particular discipline (art) because the tutors already knew what he was capable of and encouraged him to go his own way from the start. Because he was already tried and tested and they didn't have to spend valuable time testing him out before trusting his judgement, he's made a better start than he would have done elsewhere. Don't know if that's applicable to other places or subjects, but it's worth considering. (Plus the 10% fee discount helps...)
0
reply
gutenberg
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by nic-nac)
1) Do many people do their post grad at the same uni?
From my experience, yes. Although my sample is a bit skewed because my undergrad was considered one of the best in my country, so if you wanted to stay at home it was a logical place to go. However, I have noticed that many who did Master's courses and who went on to PhDs, went elsewhere for the doctorate.

2) Are you more likely to get accepted because they already know you? I didn't like to ask what grade they got in their undergrad except the one applying to Cambridge.
Again, from my experience, yes. Like Klix, I know people who were borderline 2.1/2.2 who got accepted who would perhaps have found it a bit harder elsewhere. I also know of people who were assured that even if they didn't get the supposedly required 2.1, provided that they didn't get too low of a 2.2, they would still have their place.

3) Could it be that the others passed, but this uni was the only one they could get into ? or that they really like the uni (I don't really have any other uni to compare it to)
For some people, their personal and family circumstances might tie them to the city where the uni is, so if they want to do postgrad study, their undergrad uni could be the only real option. For others, the courses offered by their undergrad institution could genuinely be good for them, because of interests developed during their earlier studies: students often pick up on interests of the academic staff in their undergrad uni, and thus if they wanted to study some aspect of those in greater detail, it would be logical to stay on. For some, particularly those unsure of grades etc., their undergrad institution could be a 'safe bet' in terms of knowing they will still have a place even if final grades don't work out quite in their favour. Then there's financial considerations: the discount, as Klix mentioned, and in some cases people could continue to live at home, which in light of the lack of funding especially for arts Master's, would be a significant factor for some.

4) I would've thought that if you did well (2:1/1st) you could easily get into a higher ranking uni for post grad studies ?
You probably could, depending on the subject/course and the university you wanted, but people don't always want to go elsewhere, for any of the reasons I mentioned above or some other reason. Staying at your undergrad institution doesn't automatically mean a lack of ambition, or an inability to get in elsewhere. For postgrad, it becomes much more about the supervisor than the university, and if there is the perfect supervisor for your subject area where you already are, then it could make sense to stay.
0
reply
username848676
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
I would say it's fairly common. Quite a lot of unis will offer discounts for their UG students.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
poohat
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
At top universities it is very common for undergrads to stay on to do PhDs

However doing this doesnt really make sense if you are at a lower tier university. Realistically you want to do your PhD at the best place possible, and if you have the grades to be competitive for funding then you should really be applying to Oxbridge/London/etc (depending on which places are best in your field).

For a Masters specifically you definitely want to be at the most prestigious place possible, since typically a MSc isnt an end in itself, but is rather a signal of competence that you are going to leverage to get into a good job or PhD program afterwards
2
reply
poohat
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by Klix88)
At postgrad level, it's more common to follow your research interests, regardless of perceived status or ranking table placements. For example, my Masters uni was RG - I did a taught Masters in a rather niche subject and that was the only uni in the UK which offered it. My undergrad/PhD uni is a former poly. Oxbridge would have been useless for me at both Masters and PhD level, as the relevant departments don't have a focus on what I want to research.
This isnt aimed at you specifically because I have no idea what field you are in, but if no universities in the UK are interested in your area except a niche ex-poly, then you are possibly going to struggle with career prospects after your PhD (at least when it comes to getting an academic job) since there is presumably only one university in the whole country who would want to hire people that work in this area.

"Following your research interests' is one thing, but realistically most people have fairly bendable interests (especially since undergrads dont really know enough to know what they are interested in beyond very broad terms), and imo you should factor career prospects into your decision somewhere too. Becoming an expert in an area that noone cares about might be a fun way to spend 3 years, but it may not be a strong foundation on which to build an academic career afterwards. Academic job prospects are bad enough, without closing off the majority of universities in the country.
0
reply
Klix88
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by poohat)
This isnt aimed at you specifically because I have no idea what field you are in, but if no universities in the UK are interested in your area except a niche ex-poly, then you are possibly going to struggle with career prospects after your PhD (at least when it comes to getting an academic job) since there is presumably only one university in the whole country who would want to hire people that work in this area.

"Following your research interests' is one thing, but realistically most people have fairly bendable interests (especially since undergrads dont really know enough to know what they are interested in beyond very broad terms), and imo you should factor career prospects into your decision somewhere too. Becoming an expert in an area that noone cares about might be a fun way to spend 3 years, but it may not be a strong foundation on which to build an academic career afterwards. Academic job prospects are bad enough, without closing off the majority of universities in the country.
To be honest, I didn't seriously look beyond my current uni - it was where I wanted to be, where I knew I could get good supervision, and it currently holds internationally important and currently unpublished primary research material. There didn't seem to be a need to look elsewhere. Certainly there are other UK unis which cover my research interests in the broader sense, but none likely to offer that combination of advantages. I don't believe I've limited my attractiveness to other unis (although see below).

Lecturers at my Masters uni unofficially offered me a couple of PhD projects, but these were unfunded and not of direct interest to me. Had they come with funding, then I would certainly have given them more thought.

As for working, I'm unlikely to get employment in my field and I've known that for a couple of years now. Both the commercial and academic sides offer minimal employment opportunities, for a range of reasons related to the recession of the past few years. I therefore decided that as I'd be studying for the pleasure of it and not the future career advantage, that I'd follow my own selfish research preferences. I only started the PhD because I couldn't get a job in my field after my Masters. It's really a way of staying involved with a subject that fascinates me, on more than just a hobby basis, which will last as long as I can afford it.

Not all PhDs are done for the job prospects. In fact, I'd suggest that anyone thinking a PhD was going to improve their employability, might want to research their planned career very carefully first. It's acknowledged that UK unis turn out many more PhDs each year, than there are vacancies for PhDs.
1
reply
goodtogallop
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
I am currently doing an MSc at the same uni as my undergrad. My situation is untypical, as I was offered the MSc off the back of a summer research project I did at the end of my undergrad, so I definitely wouldnt have got it if I hadnt done my undergrad there (or if I hadnt done the summer project). I got a good 2.1, so I'm sure I could have got in elsewhere, but I didnt seriously look into any other options as I wasnt planning on doing a postgrad. I did apply to a PhD at a very different institution on a bit of a whim and ended up being offered it, but I decided it wasnt for me and turned it down.


I think there are many reasons people stay at the same institutions - as well as it being potentially easier to get in and there often being a discount in fees (not sure if this is the case at my uni, its not relevant to me as mine is funded), people often like to stay in an environment/area they are comfortable in, there are often still people around that they know, etc etc
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • SOAS University of London
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 29 May '19
  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Day - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Thu, 30 May '19
  • Cranfield University
    Cranfield Forensic MSc Programme Open Day Postgraduate
    Fri, 31 May '19

How did your AQA A-level Business Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (222)
22.72%
The paper was reasonable (441)
45.14%
Not feeling great about that exam... (176)
18.01%
It was TERRIBLE (138)
14.12%

Watched Threads

View All