not the right A levels for medicine Watch

Jstanothagirl16
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hey guys,
so like I'm in year 12 and for A levels I picked history, psychology , sociology and RE. I never used to be interested in medicine but recently I've been to a few workshops because my friend wants to study it and I like it and I'm starting to really consider it as a future option. But I haven't taken any sciences or maths for a levels and its already too late to change my option. I don't really know what to do at this point. I did really well in double science at GCSE (got AA) so i can academically achieve a medical degree if I pursued it. I don't really know what to do so any advice?
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Jkizer
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(Original post by Jstanothagirl16)
hey guys,
so like I'm in year 12 and for A levels I picked history, psychology , sociology and RE. I never used to be interested in medicine but recently I've been to a few workshops because my friend wants to study it and I like it and I'm starting to really consider it as a future option. But I haven't taken any sciences or maths for a levels and its already too late to change my option. I don't really know what to do at this point. I did really well in double science at GCSE (got AA) so i can academically achieve a medical degree if I pursued it. I don't really know what to do so any advice?
Complete your AS levels and see where it goes from there. You will have MUCH clearer idea on what you want to do.

If you still desire medicine, you will have to restart your AS levels and take Chemistry and Biology/Physics. Or just drop 2 AS's, take Chemistry & Bio and take a 3rd year to complete them.
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Jstanothagirl16
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Thanks and Yh I guess I'll do that


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Scoobster
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I don't mean to come across as arrogant, but even before you consider Medicine, are you academically bright enough? Your current A Level choices aren't particularly academic. What did you get for your GCSE's?

The competition for Medicine is frightening, when considering your application it's going to be obvious (from not originally choosing the Sciences) that you weren't even considering Medicine until after you started your A Levels. I'm not saying it's a bad thing - I'm 24, have a degree in Law and am just finishing a masters in Law with no intention to practice Law and no idea on what the hell I want to do in life - but I'd be prepared to quizzed quite harshly on why Medicine wasn't your first choice, and the sudden change in mind.

What I'm saying is that Universities will be questioning your dedication to Medicine, and given the competition, you might find that hard to overcome. Though by no means impossible, if your heart is in it.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Jstanothagirl16)
hey guys,
so like I'm in year 12 and for A levels I picked history, psychology , sociology and RE. I never used to be interested in medicine but recently I've been to a few workshops because my friend wants to study it and I like it and I'm starting to really consider it as a future option. But I haven't taken any sciences or maths for a levels and its already too late to change my option. I don't really know what to do at this point. I did really well in double science at GCSE (got AA) so i can academically achieve a medical degree if I pursued it. I don't really know what to do so any advice?
Have you considered doing a foundation program? It sounds like a good option for someone with your A level choices and it means you won't have to spend another two years doing biology and chemistry A levels

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...icine_Programs

You should also look into arranging work experience so you can gain some first hand experience of what a life in medicine would be like.

(Original post by Scoobster)
I don't mean to come across as arrogant, but even before you consider Medicine, are you academically bright enough? Your current A Level choices aren't particularly academic. What did you get for your GCSE's?

The competition for Medicine is frightening, when considering your application it's going to be obvious (from not originally choosing the Sciences) that you weren't even considering Medicine until after you started your A Levels. I'm not saying it's a bad thing - I'm 24, have a degree in Law and am just finishing a masters in Law with no intention to practice Law and no idea on what the hell I want to do in life - but I'd be prepared to quizzed quite harshly on why Medicine wasn't your first choice, and the sudden change in mind.

What I'm saying is that Universities will be questioning your dedication to Medicine, and given the competition, you might find that hard to overcome. Though by no means impossible, if your heart is in it.
You don't come across as arrogant but you are really misinformed :sadnod:
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Scoobster
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(Original post by Democracy)
Have you considered doing a foundation program? It sounds like a good option for someone with your A level choices and it means you won't have to spend another two years doing biology and chemistry A levels

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...icine_Programs

You should also look into arranging work experience so you can gain some first hand experience of what a life in medicine would be like.



You don't come across as arrogant but you are really misinformed :sadnod:
What aspects of my post do you believe are really misinformed?
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Democracy
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(Original post by Scoobster)
What aspects of my post do you believe are really misinformed?
Pretty much all of it

The OP's A levels are not "unacademic" for a start.

you weren't even considering Medicine until after you started your A Levels
Lots of people don't consider medicine until later on in life - it's why we have graduate entry programmes for a start. Not being sure about what you want to do at 16/17/18 is the most normal thing in the world anyway.

but I'd be prepared to quizzed quite harshly on why Medicine wasn't your first choice, and the sudden change in mind
Again, not true at all - medical schools would much rather take on someone who took the time to properly think about going into medicine rather than someone who wants to do it simply because it was their childhood dream.

What I'm saying is that Universities will be questioning your dedication to Medicine, and given the competition, you might find that hard to overcome.
They really won't, that's why we have foundation programs.

Hope that answers your question :yy:
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Scoobster
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(Original post by Democracy)
Pretty much all of it

The OP's A levels are not "unacademic" for a start.



Lots of people don't consider medicine until later on in life - it's why we have graduate entry programmes for a start. Not being sure about what you want to do at 16/17/18 is the most normal thing in the world anyway.



Again, not true at all - medical schools would much rather take on someone who took the time to properly think about going into medicine rather than someone who wants to do it simply because it was their childhood dream.



They really won't, that's why we have foundation programs.

Hope that answers your question :yy:
I don't want to go too off topic, but their application will simply not be as strong as others within Medicine, given their current situation and based on the decisions they've made.

When somebody has displayed a keen interest in pursuing Medicine from a young age, has displayed academic competency in the required subjects, and has valid work experience, compared to somebody who has not, has not, and has not - you're at a disadvantage.

I don't want OP to be naive to the nature of Medicine, it wouldn't be fair for me to say they've got a great chance if:
They have average GCSE's
They have average AS/A Levels in unfavourable subjects
They have no valid work experience
They have little idea of the competition they will be faced with

Though as per my first post, OP if your heart is in it, that often counts more than other attributes. That's all I'm saying.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Scoobster)
I don't want to go too off topic, but their application will simply not be as strong as others within Medicine, given their current situation and based on the decisions they've made.

When somebody has displayed a keen interest in pursuing Medicine from a young age, has displayed academic competency in the required subjects, and has valid work experience, compared to somebody who has not, has not, and has not - you're at a disadvantage.

I don't want OP to be naive to the nature of Medicine, it wouldn't be fair for me to say they've got a great chance if:
They have average GCSE's
They have average AS/A Levels in unfavourable subjects
They have no valid work experience
They have little idea of the competition they will be faced with

Though as per my first post, OP if your heart is in it, that often counts more than other attributes. That's all I'm saying.
Ha, I really don't get why you're trying to argue this point with me dude - I'm a current medical student and I know how med schools view different groups of applicants much better than you do.

You're at a disadvantage if you apply to a course which wants biology and chemistry A levels - but that doesn't mean you're at a disadvantage full stop (which is what you're asserting) since foundation and access courses exist for this precise reason: to provide people with the wrong A levels a chance to go to medical school with no discrimination. Your "advice" is misleading and discouraging, and you have no idea what the OP's GCSE grades are anyway so I don't know how you can possibly say that they're "average".

I take back what I said about you not sounding arrogant, my bad :rolleyes:
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Scoobster
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(Original post by Democracy)
Your "advice" is misleading and discouraging, and you have no idea what the OP's GCSE grades are anyway so I don't know how you can possibly say that they're "average".

I take back what I said about you not sounding arrogant, my bad :rolleyes:
I never said they were, I said 'if' they were, hence why I asked for confirmation of them.

Don't worry, you're not the first to be mistaken.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Scoobster)
I never said they were, I said 'if' they were, hence why I asked for confirmation of them.

Don't worry, you're not the first to be mistaken.
Ah, so your assessment of the situation is based on your own personal conjectures and hypotheses. Stellar advice giving skills bro :top:
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River85
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(Original post by Scoobster)
They have average AS/A Levels in unfavourable subjects.
As already said by others, those subjects are not "unacademic" or even "unfavourable" (beyond not being biology and chem which isn't necessarily fatal as I'll explain). I hope you agree that history is academic. Why are the others less so? As someone who took A-level Religious Studies (Philosophy and Ethics specifically, though it had a misleading name of "Christian Theology"), I speak from experience when I say it was as challenging, if not more challenging, than History, English Literature and Geography.

Will the OP get into normal undergraduate entry at a medical school that requires Biology and Chemistry A-levels? No*. Will the OP get into a foundation year or access course which will get him or her onto a medical degree? Quite possibly.

*This is assuming the OP doesn't take Biology and Chemistry next year, of course.

You know yourself, as someone with two degrees but no clear career plan, that it can take some considerable time to really find your career interest and vocation. I know several people who didn't consider medicine until toward the end of, or even after, their A-levels. Far better spend some time getting life experience and considering a range of career options, before deciding to do medicine, than to claim it has been a childhood dream. Are people even aware of what a doctor really does at the age of, say, five? Or even 12?

Medical schools will also realise that some students lack confidence or feel a career in medicine is out of reach. Especially those students from less well off backgrounds. It may not be until much later that their aspirations are raised.
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Phteven
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(Original post by Scoobster)
I don't want to go too off topic, but their application will simply not be as strong as others within Medicine, given their current situation and based on the decisions they've made.

When somebody has displayed a keen interest in pursuing Medicine from a young age, has displayed academic competency in the required subjects, and has valid work experience, compared to somebody who has not, has not, and has not - you're at a disadvantage.

I don't want OP to be naive to the nature of Medicine, it wouldn't be fair for me to say they've got a great chance if:
They have average GCSE's
They have average AS/A Levels in unfavourable subjects
They have no valid work experience
They have little idea of the competition they will be faced with

Though as per my first post, OP if your heart is in it, that often counts more than other attributes. That's all I'm saying.
This is why we should still have neg rep. Not to sound really nasty or anything, but you haven't got a clue what you're talking about and you should let someone that does help the OP rather than misinforming him/her.


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smd4std
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you need chem and bio to get straight in to medicine but if you complete those a levels you can do a foundation year and then get in to medicine or even do another degree at uni then do graduate entry medicine
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lucas13
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youll probably have to start the year again, why didnt you do biology/chemistry in the first place, if you dont lik them then medicine is probably not for you, it is very a hard degree and you need aaa at a level as well
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River85
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(Original post by lucas13)
youll probably have to start the year again, why didnt you do biology/chemistry in the first place, if you dont lik them then medicine is probably not for you, it is very a hard degree and you need aaa at a level as well
Not liking biology and chemistry isn't necessarily such a bad thing, providing the OP still has sufficient motivation and academic ability to achieve well in both. A Medicine degree is not really "Biology and Chemistry A-level MKII"

But no where is it suggested the OP doesn't like them. Given the A in GCSE Science, he or she probably did. But as medicine was never considered an option (as many 16 year olds don't consider it), and the OP felt they were as strong, or stronger, in the humanities, then they were never considered as subjects.

It need not mean "starting the year again". Biology and Chem AS can be taken fresh next year, alongside one or two of the current subjects at A2. Or the OP can apply for a foundation year.
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randdom
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(Original post by lucas13)
youll probably have to start the year again, why didnt you do biology/chemistry in the first place, if you dont lik them then medicine is probably not for you, it is very a hard degree and you need aaa at a level as well
Not completely true. While I liked some of my biology as/a2 I hated chemistry. I found that when I got to medical school and it all became more relevant to what I wanted to do (rather than plants and hydrocarbons) I enjoyed the science side of it much more. That is not to say they don't have their uses or not to do them, just that not liking bio/chem at as/a2 isn't the be all and end all.

When it comes to the original question. Other people have already talked about some of the options you have. Just to address one issue that has been raised. Providing you meet the entry requirements either through a foundation year or restarting your a levels and you have done your research and work experience there is no reason universities should penalise you for not knowing that is what you wanted to do at aged 16. I interviewed people for medical school admissions in the past and I wouldn't have held it against someone and doing so was never mentioned.


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Jstanothagirl16
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Thank you everyone for your advice it's helped a lot... Ermm I got A* in chem the chem and bio in GCSE For both years, sucked at physics which is why overall was A along with that at gcse's i got 5 A and 2B so I think I'm alright academically... The reason I didn't choose sciences in the beginning was because I hadn't really considered medicine and tbh our schools science department is really bad and specialises In humanities subjects so Yh... But thank you , I don't really want to stay in school for 3 years so I think I'll look into the foundation course... Thank you all for the information, it's helped clear a lot of things up for me


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