Should there be a higher penalty for corrupt policemen? Watch

Poll: Should there be a higher penalty for corrupt police officers?
Yes (explain why in thread) (5)
100%
No (explain why in threat) (0)
0%
Neutral (explain why in thread) (0)
0%
Rational Thinker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Any thoughts?
0
reply
Rational Thinker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#2
Bump.
0
reply
Aj12
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by Rational Thinker)
Any thoughts?
Whats the current penalty
1
reply
Snagprophet
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
No that'll probably violate their human rights.
0
reply
Rational Thinker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Aj12)
Whats the current penalty
Presumably just a relatively mild imprisonment. Which considering the power they were entrusted with seems a bit weak.
0
reply
PQ
  • PS Reviewer
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by Rational Thinker)
Presumably just a relatively mild imprisonment. Which considering the power they were entrusted with seems a bit weak.
I think you'd find people would engage with the debate if you put a bit of effort into finding out the current punishment rather than expecting other people to base their opinions on your presumptions or do the research for you.
1
reply
Rational Thinker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by PQ)
I think you'd find people would engage with the debate if you put a bit of effort into finding out the current punishment rather than expecting other people to base their opinions on your presumptions or do the research for you.
The punishment varies and in some cases was merely a written warning.
http://www.theguardian.com/news/data...pcc-corruption
0
reply
tom3232
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
Yes.
They are in a position of authority; they are employed to uphold moral standards.
If they break the standards that they are entrusted to enforce; in my opinion, they should receive a tougher penalty than the average joe.
0
reply
Olie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by tom3232)
Yes.
They are in a position of authority; they are employed to uphold moral standards.
If they break the standards that they are entrusted to enforce. In my opinion they should receive a tougher penalty than the average joe.
This.
0
reply
PQ
  • PS Reviewer
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
I'm ambivalent tbh but I'm interested in some replies here

Just a general point - if punishment includes imprisonment then surely equal sentencing results in a harsher punishment for police officers - prison isn't a very nice place for anyone but it is particularly unwelcoming of ex police officers.
(Original post by tom3232)
Yes.
They are in a position of authority;
Most people who can be charged with corruption are in a position of authority - there's not much call for corrupt street sweepers and care workers.

Why are police more authoritative than lawyers, politicians, business managers etc? Or rather why would they be worth treating more harshly than other authority figures?
they are employed to uphold moral standards.
Well no - they're employed to uphold the laws as laid down by parliament and as prosecuted by the judiciary...I doubt anyone is technically employed to uphold moral standards....maybe the queen as head of the CoE?
0
reply
Rational Thinker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by PQ)
I'm ambivalent tbh but I'm interested in some replies here

Just a general point - if punishment includes imprisonment then surely equal sentencing results in a harsher punishment for police officers - prison isn't a very nice place for anyone but it is particularly unwelcoming of ex police officers.

Most people who can be charged with corruption are in a position of authority - there's not much call for corrupt street sweepers and care workers.

Why are police more authoritative than lawyers, politicians, business managers etc? Or rather why would they be worth treating more harshly than other authority figures?

Well no - they're employed to uphold the laws as laid down by parliament and as prosecuted by the judiciary...I doubt anyone is technically employed to uphold moral standards....maybe the queen as head of the CoE?
The first point seems rather just. If they have abused their authority, I fail to see why they should not be thrown to the wolves? They have thrown others to them. The police have a particular insular culture which is designed to stop officers being held to account, this culture especially in the wake of Hillsborough and the Stephen Lawrence inquiry needs to be abolished. I think it is time for the police to realise that are not above the law, they are servants of the people and not their rulers.
0
reply
PQ
  • PS Reviewer
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by Rational Thinker)
The first point seems rather just. If they have abused their authority, I fail to see why they should not be thrown to the wolves? They have thrown others to them. The police have a particular insular culture which is designed to stop officers being held to account, this culture especially in the wake of Hillsborough and the Stephen Lawrence inquiry needs to be abolished.
THAT I strongly agree with - just not sure that harsher punishment will solve the cultural problem.

I think the two cases you've highlighted there is a significant problem of justice not being seen to be done (and in the case of Hillsborough senior police offices literally getting away with manslaughter - never mind corruption that just applies to all of the people involved in the coverup).

I'm a strong believer that punishments aren't generally real deterrents - noone commits a crime thinking "when I get caught I'll get off lightly" they commit crime thinking that they wont get caught.

With that in mind IMO if you want to change the culture then you have to work on improving detection and conviction and encouraging whistleblowing/reporting of bad behaviour within the organisation.
0
reply
Rational Thinker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#13
(Original post by PQ)
THAT I strongly agree with - just not sure that harsher punishment will solve the cultural problem.

I think the two cases you've highlighted there is a significant problem of justice not being seen to be done (and in the case of Hillsborough senior police offices literally getting away with manslaughter - never mind corruption that just applies to all of the people involved in the coverup).

I'm a strong believer that punishments aren't generally real deterrents - noone commits a crime thinking "when I get caught I'll get off lightly" they commit crime thinking that they wont get caught.

With that in mind IMO if you want to change the culture then you have to work on improving detection and conviction and encouraging whistleblowing/reporting of bad behaviour within the organisation.
I think that the whistleblowing and reporting will not happen unless at least a few police officers are severely punished, if only to shock them. These police officers are not people in desperate circumstances who are merely trying to survive and turn to crime as a result, they are often malevolent bullies in many circumstances and it is time to show they are accountable. Unless this happens Hillsborough and Stephen Lawrence type cases will continue.
0
reply
tom3232
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
(Original post by PQ)
I'm ambivalent tbh but I'm interested in some replies here

Just a general point - if punishment includes imprisonment then surely equal sentencing results in a harsher punishment for police officers - prison isn't a very nice place for anyone but it is particularly unwelcoming of ex police officers.

Most people who can be charged with corruption are in a position of authority - there's not much call for corrupt street sweepers and care workers.

Why are police more authoritative than lawyers, politicians, business managers etc? Or rather why would they be worth treating more harshly than other authority figures?

Well no - they're employed to uphold the laws as laid down by parliament and as prosecuted by the judiciary...I doubt anyone is technically employed to uphold moral standards....maybe the queen as head of the CoE?


Well I would argue that the polices duty is to enforce the law, the law is there to to protect citizens and benefit society. Moral values are very much a part of the law. Thus I would say that the polices role is to uphold common decency and moral values.

As for the point of corruption coming from a position of power. You raise an interesting point. I suppose for me as the polices only role is to uphold the law. I, personally feel that they deserve a tougher punishment.
0
reply
DouglasAdams
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
Is there an option not to explain why in the thread...? I'm lazy
0
reply
PQ
  • PS Reviewer
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by Rational Thinker)
I think that the whistleblowing and reporting will not happen unless at least a few police officers are severely punished, if only to shock them.
Again I don't think I agree that that would be a solution. Whistleblowing often involves reporting on people who you work with all the time, possibly spend time with socially etc etc. A harsh punishment might discourage whistleblowing.
0
reply
Rational Thinker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#17
(Original post by PQ)
Again I don't think I agree that that would be a solution. Whistleblowing often involves reporting on people who you work with all the time, possibly spend time with socially etc etc. A harsh punishment might discourage whistleblowing.
How? if those the whistleblower is reporting on are not punished severely, surely they might quickly be able to seek vengeance against whistleblower?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA A-level Business Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (221)
22.97%
The paper was reasonable (430)
44.7%
Not feeling great about that exam... (174)
18.09%
It was TERRIBLE (137)
14.24%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise