is 'recruitment consultant' a con job Watch

raf123321
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#1
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#1
looking at careers and finding a lot of graduate trainee recruitment jobs, a bit like the 'sales & marketing' jobs which always appear and seem easy to get in to. any way wanted to know what a recruitment consultant does, is it a real salary? will they take anyone on?
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daindian
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#2
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Not a con job. It's very long hours. It's the second fastest growing industry
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Smack
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#3
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No, it's a sales job. You're selling people to companies.
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raf123321
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is it difficult, what kind of things would you be doing, are you actually recruiting peopel yourself?
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A5ko
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You just piss companies off by mass emailing 'people specs' that in no way fit any of the criteria the company wants or needs.

You get paid for it too.
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moutonfou
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I'm currently a trainee recruitment consultant. It has a very high drop out rate hence the many many job vacancies, but if you do well at it you can be well paid.

Basically as a consultant you will nag companies to let you look for people to fill their vacancies, then you will find people to fill those vacancies by posting ads or searching job boards, submit the best candidates back to the original company, hopefully they interview one of your candidates and (ultimately) give them the job. The recruitment agency then gets a cut of their salary as a reward and you get a cut of that cut in commission (usually 5-10%).

Basic salaries are usually £15,000 for a trainee going up to £30,000 for a good experienced consultant, with £1000 a month extra in commission being considered a reasonable extra income for a good, established consultant.

The sectors vary very widely. At one end you can be placing lorry drivers in minimum wage jobs, this is a lot easier and you will probably be able to fill over 50 vacancies a day minimum but obviously at a very low margin. On the other end you can be recruiting people at the very top of the ladder for salaries over £100,000; obviously placing one of those is going to be equivalent to placing hundreds of lorry drivers, but you will probably fill vacancies much less frequently.

You have to think about your character when choosing what sort of sector to aim for because if you aren't comfortable in the sector you will struggle. Think about whether you're somebody who is attracted by 'big business' and corporate culture or whether you're more 'small business', 'public sector', cosy etc. There are agencies dedicated to placing teachers, scientists, engineers, social workers, lorry drivers, office workers, business people, ICT workers and even recruitment agencies which specialise in recruiting recruitment consultants! So whatever your degree is in, there should be a sector which you already have existing knowledge of and you can emphasise this in your application.

Also think about whether you want to train in a company where you are one of tens or maybe even hundreds of graduate trainees or whether you would prefer to be the sole trainee or one of a small number of trainees in a small company. Look carefully at who is doing the hiring on the job ad - large companies will generally use a recruitment-to-recruitment agency to do their hiring for them; if you are looking for a role in a smaller company look for recruitment agencies who are hiring directly. Don't be afraid to ring up, introduce yourself and ask for more information: this looks proactive and helps you find out a) who is actually doing the hiring and b) whether the sector/company size would be a good fit for you.

It is a 'career' (/short term filler job) worth exploring if you don't have fixed career plans or are having difficulty getting a job as it gives you skills in lots of areas - you'll be doing some admin, some sales, some marketing, some accounting, so it helps you explore what you like and build up relevant experience while you figure out what you want to do.
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cheriebb
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#7
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i once knew someone who was a recruitment agent, I dont anymore. haha

i have no respect for this job. what astonishes me is how low the bar is and people without any qualification interview senior with 20 years experience. what would a 20 year old know about a specific role or sector. I have been through this whole process of recruitment and met with many idiots who have no idea what they are talking about, However they are an important link of the cycle and i have to just put my happy face on and pretend i like them.

The saddest things is that the graduate market is flooded with ****ty recruitment and sales jobs. I had to wait a few months for a proper job to come up.
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Uni=RipOff
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I hear alot of the job centre jobs are from such companies/people. They just want you to sign on to their spam mail and text services, and spam crap to you all day. When you tell them to stop they dont stop.
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Ohjaypee
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I disagree.

I work in recruitment now and my job is quite complex. I have 4 or 5 trusted clients who consistently send me vacancies and it is my job to search for the best candidate based on my understanding of the sector, salary expectations, company culture etc.

I maybe place 1 or 2 people a month, high end clients only, with a return of about £10,000 per placement. I don't get commission I get a very good salary at £25,000 and a discretionary bonus based on performance at the end of each quarter. Which can be up to £5,000. When I get my next pay review I will be earning £29,000. And the company excessive encourage internal progression and I am confident I will be promoted within the next 12 months, where I will be on £37,000.

If done properly it can be a very good career. It is essentially Sales & Marketing, but it also opens a tonne of doors. I have been offered numerous roles by clients who appreciate my abilities.

There are a lot of commission house style recruiters out there who aren't worth jack****, but the two big players in the corporate recruitment game, now they are some damn good jobs,
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Guybrush Sheepgood
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#10
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It's not a con job, as mentioned it's a huge industry with a massive drop out rate as it's mostly a sales-type soul destroying role. A lot of it is based on commission. Obviously there will be a lot of exceptions to this rule but generally I've heard from a lot of (dropped out) recruitment consultants that it's not a pleasant industry to work in for obvious reasons.

You're right, sales and marketing jobs are almost always weighted towards sales, and the marketing in the title is just there to get people to apply, it isn't real marketing.

If you want a nice job try marketing-specific roles - much more competitive but better jobs in my opinion (massively depending on the company you work for and the specific role).

That being said if you are good at recruitment / sales then you can quickly earn a lot of money - faster than marketing.
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shoran12
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#11
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From what I have seen of recruitment consultants..........they are absolutely awful. My sector is IT/Telecoms. I have worked for large (very large) multinationals in foreign countries...only to be interviewed by an ignorant 21 year old who has NO idea at all........absolutely awful commission based sales people. Truly awful......beyond contempt.
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Jokesonyoum8
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#12
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(Original post by Ohjaypee)
I disagree.

I work in recruitment now and my job is quite complex. I have 4 or 5 trusted clients who consistently send me vacancies and it is my job to search for the best candidate based on my understanding of the sector, salary expectations, company culture etc.

I maybe place 1 or 2 people a month, high end clients only, with a return of about £10,000 per placement. I don't get commission I get a very good salary at £25,000 and a discretionary bonus based on performance at the end of each quarter. Which can be up to £5,000. When I get my next pay review I will be earning £29,000. And the company excessive encourage internal progression and I am confident I will be promoted within the next 12 months, where I will be on £37,000.

If done properly it can be a very good career. It is essentially Sales & Marketing, but it also opens a tonne of doors. I have been offered numerous roles by clients who appreciate my abilities.

There are a lot of commission house style recruiters out there who aren't worth jack****, but the two big players in the corporate recruitment game, now they are some damn good jobs,
How long are your hours?
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MayBNewRecruiter
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#13
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#13
I'm looking to get into the Trainee Recruitment Consultant industry on the Retail sector side of things never done it before but I have been to a couple agencies when I've been in and out of jobs so I think I know what it entails.

It's basically :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin:ting candidates to clients and vice versa! I'm good at :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin:tin' aswell! Lol
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Judge Jules
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#14
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(Original post by moutonfou)
I'm currently a trainee recruitment consultant. It has a very high drop out rate hence the many many job vacancies, but if you do well at it you can be well paid.

Basically as a consultant you will nag companies to let you look for people to fill their vacancies, then you will find people to fill those vacancies by posting ads or searching job boards, submit the best candidates back to the original company, hopefully they interview one of your candidates and (ultimately) give them the job. The recruitment agency then gets a cut of their salary as a reward and you get a cut of that cut in commission (usually 5-10%).

Basic salaries are usually £15,000 for a trainee going up to £30,000 for a good experienced consultant, with £1000 a month extra in commission being considered a reasonable extra income for a good, established consultant.

The sectors vary very widely. At one end you can be placing lorry drivers in minimum wage jobs, this is a lot easier and you will probably be able to fill over 50 vacancies a day minimum but obviously at a very low margin. On the other end you can be recruiting people at the very top of the ladder for salaries over £100,000; obviously placing one of those is going to be equivalent to placing hundreds of lorry drivers, but you will probably fill vacancies much less frequently.

You have to think about your character when choosing what sort of sector to aim for because if you aren't comfortable in the sector you will struggle. Think about whether you're somebody who is attracted by 'big business' and corporate culture or whether you're more 'small business', 'public sector', cosy etc. There are agencies dedicated to placing teachers, scientists, engineers, social workers, lorry drivers, office workers, business people, ICT workers and even recruitment agencies which specialise in recruiting recruitment consultants! So whatever your degree is in, there should be a sector which you already have existing knowledge of and you can emphasise this in your application.

Also think about whether you want to train in a company where you are one of tens or maybe even hundreds of graduate trainees or whether you would prefer to be the sole trainee or one of a small number of trainees in a small company. Look carefully at who is doing the hiring on the job ad - large companies will generally use a recruitment-to-recruitment agency to do their hiring for them; if you are looking for a role in a smaller company look for recruitment agencies who are hiring directly. Don't be afraid to ring up, introduce yourself and ask for more information: this looks proactive and helps you find out a) who is actually doing the hiring and b) whether the sector/company size would be a good fit for you.

It is a 'career' (/short term filler job) worth exploring if you don't have fixed career plans or are having difficulty getting a job as it gives you skills in lots of areas - you'll be doing some admin, some sales, some marketing, some accounting, so it helps you explore what you like and build up relevant experience while you figure out what you want to do.

How do you find a list of employers to contact to join your agency ?
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Tsar101
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On average,how long do people last? Is it a secure job?
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BritishGirl
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(Original post by Tsar101)
On average,how long do people last? Is it a secure job?
Some people last a few months to 2 years. But as it's a competitive job; it's mainly sales.So some might stay longer depending how good they are.
I work in Recruitment and have been at my current company for nearly 2 years.
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ScouseEmma28
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#17
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(Original post by raf123321)
looking at careers and finding a lot of graduate trainee recruitment jobs, a bit like the 'sales & marketing' jobs which always appear and seem easy to get in to. any way wanted to know what a recruitment consultant does, is it a real salary? will they take anyone on?
Unless you're massively motivated by money, have the drive to cold call, meet targets and new people all the time, then don't do it.

I was a trainee recruitment consultant for about a week (a few years ago now - but i'm 36 btw!)- then realized it wasn't for me.I gave it a try because i'm a huge people person and like helping others. It's a money game and not really about feeling sympathetic. Not all agencies are the same, but if you have any shred of soul/empathy/sincerity - avoid it. The high turnover rate of consultants speaks volumes. Long days, target driven and by and large - most consultants don't give a t0ss about temps unless they're REALLY desperate to fill a sh1tty job - then they'll be all over you like a rash (i should know - been a temp- in total - for 10 years and worked for about several different agencies).HAYS and Manpower have been reliable agencies for me over the years - but the rest, nope.

Otherwise, try it and give it a go.
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meganw123
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#18
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I started my position at an agency as a trainee and I have to say, as much sales and target driven the industry can be, it isn't as bad as people make it out.If you persevere and genuinely want to help people and succeed then it is a very rewarding job, not just because of money, it is rewarding when you place someone in a job and effectively change their lives.Yes, sales is very much a part of the job but if you describe it as
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Protocolboy
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#19
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I have been in recruitment for 15 years. Someone said pick a sector that you have some kind of desire to want to be talking in that jargon all day. I do education which was once a more 'cosy' sector as if you were good at building trusting rapport with your candidates and clients then you should do well....coupled with some long hours now and again and patience, a moral backbone ( so many fly by night recruiters out there who make even myself, as a recruiter, ashamed sometimes to be named as the same profession) and lots of motivation...there are severe lows and some nice ups when things go well...if u are not such a cut throats person then do medical, nurses, education, social care...the caring professions where cultural fit and personality of the person u are finding a job for is just as essential as their skill set. I would personally avoid IT, Communications, Engineering, Finance...it's less recruitment with a human touch, more ' I want more commission and I don't care who I will trample on to get it. Don't get me wrong, I once knew a real cowbag called Jessica in education recruitment. Awful woman, would lie to her clients and candidates. She would sell her granny if it meant hitting her target...yuk....go for it, recruitment can be fun but it can burn people out quick. It's rare to find people like me with 15 yrs but I am 40 now...I don't wanna be doing this all my life...it's a young persons game
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