Coalition vs New Labour Watch

Poll: Have the coalition done a better job of running our country than new labour>
A lot better (15)
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A lot worse (10)
21.28%
No difference (8)
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A bit worse (5)
10.64%
A bit better (9)
19.15%
Davij038
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Has the coalition done a better job of running our country than new labour (Blair and Brown) and why/ why not?

Would love to hear what people have to say on this subject.

Thanks to all replies.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by Davij038)
Has the coalition done a better job of running our country than new labour (Blair and Brown) and why/ why not?

Would love to hear what people have to say on this subject.

Thanks to all replies.
I'd say yes. They've made changes that needed to be made and even labour acknowledge that. The coalition has done a great job at printing manufacturing and other industry. They've raised the tax threshold on low income families and they've made a commitment to energy policy.
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elohssa
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They made moves that the knew would be unpopular with the "live in the present" majority, but that were required for this country to stay alive long term.
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thoyub
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I think they made necessary decisions that were probably good for the long term but they are still too soft on crime and immigration, just like the previous Labour government. And I think some of their policies on the environment and rural affairs have been just catastrophic and not thought out properly at all.
I don't think I need to say anything on the bedroom tax.

Overall, the coalition is probably better at running the economy than labour but in other areas it has been a complete disaster. I wouldn't be too sad if the Conservatives never got in again.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by thoyub)
I think they made necessary decisions that were probably good for the long term but they are still too soft on crime and immigration, just like the previous Labour government. And I think some of their policies on the environment and rural affairs have been just catastrophic and not thought out properly at all.
I don't think I need to say anything on the bedroom tax.

Overall, the coalition is probably better at running the economy than labour but in other areas it has been a complete disaster. I wouldn't be too sad if the Conservatives never got in again.
To be fair, a lot of that legislation is enforced on us through Europe. Legislation that Labour signed up to. Sadly in the world of Big boy international politics, if a previous government has signed up to something, you have to agree to it when you come into power.

Thersa May is already trying to get out of the ECHR legislation.
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Snagprophet
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It's looking better.
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Alfissti
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It's been better for me, to my existence in UK is mostly an economic one, the day there is no money to be had from here I'm outta here pronto. Issues such as immigration, NHS, welfare etc doesn't quite bother or matter to me as I've no intention of staying here permanently, only thing that keeps me here are the very generous allowances given by HMRC for offshore oil workers, extremely generous rules on non-dom and non-resident policies, rules on incorporation, low enough corporate tax, steady returns on property investments and now very business friendly policies.

Red tape has gone down a lot under this government. This government is far more interested in SMEs within UK far more than under Labour who would support anyone but UK SMEs, selling our products and services to the government has improved a lot as it's no longer a case of needing to wait up to 8 months to get payment though you're promised 60 days, these days if they say 60 days by day 48 to 50 you will be told on what date you could expect payment. It's a lot easier to bid for government contracts as well these days so to me this is good.

Economic policies, I have this thing that the less they do the better it is, thankfully this has mostly been the case as far as I'm concerned. Only thing they didn't quite do correctly as far as I'm concerned is they increased VAT instead of lowering it and they bowed too much to the lib-dems in taking so many people off income tax while maintaining far too generous WTCs..... granted I'm not unhappy about WTCs, allows me to give 12-16 and in some cases 0 hour contracts to quite a lot of my employees and they are more than happy, I'd have a rebellion at my businesses if I did the same in Norway or Iceland where I also have business interests.

What I'm unhappy over? I'm unhappy that benefits are still so generous that so many people are willing to say it isn't worthwhile to work a NMW or AMW job. I suppose capping it to a 1% annual rise is something but I'd been happier if it had been 0.1%

Ministers I'm extremely disappointed and unhappy with :- That idiot Nick Clegg and that ******* Vince Cable, these are the stumbling blocks of the government from implementing proper policies.
Generally happy with the PM who is also my MP, Gideon Osborne is fine as long as he shuts his mouth, thankfully he is miles ahead of that "credit card Chancellor" that left UK in tatters.

Overall I'm happy with the way things are, now I only want to see a clear policy on what shall happen after a withdrawal from the EU, harsher on crime especially petty crime, I also want to see less nonsense issues and more pressing issues addressed first, **** like gay marriages, women rights or their lack of or representation at boardrooms, feminist garbage etc should take a backseat, prefer they concentrate on far more pressing issues especially those that I could make money off
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by Alfissti)
It's been better for me, to my existence in UK is mostly an economic one, the day there is no money to be had from here I'm outta here pronto. Issues such as immigration, NHS, welfare etc doesn't quite bother or matter to me as I've no intention of staying here permanently, only thing that keeps me here are the very generous allowances given by HMRC for offshore oil workers, extremely generous rules on non-dom and non-resident policies, rules on incorporation, low enough corporate tax, steady returns on property investments and now very business friendly policies.

Red tape has gone down a lot under this government. This government is far more interested in SMEs within UK far more than under Labour who would support anyone but UK SMEs, selling our products and services to the government has improved a lot as it's no longer a case of needing to wait up to 8 months to get payment though you're promised 60 days, these days if they say 60 days by day 48 to 50 you will be told on what date you could expect payment. It's a lot easier to bid for government contracts as well these days so to me this is good.

Economic policies, I have this thing that the less they do the better it is, thankfully this has mostly been the case as far as I'm concerned. Only thing they didn't quite do correctly as far as I'm concerned is they increased VAT instead of lowering it and they bowed too much to the lib-dems in taking so many people off income tax while maintaining far too generous WTCs..... granted I'm not unhappy about WTCs, allows me to give 12-16 and in some cases 0 hour contracts to quite a lot of my employees and they are more than happy, I'd have a rebellion at my businesses if I did the same in Norway or Iceland where I also have business interests.

What I'm unhappy over? I'm unhappy that benefits are still so generous that so many people are willing to say it isn't worthwhile to work a NMW or AMW job. I suppose capping it to a 1% annual rise is something but I'd been happier if it had been 0.1%

Ministers I'm extremely disappointed and unhappy with :- That idiot Nick Clegg and that ******* Vince Cable, these are the stumbling blocks of the government from implementing proper policies.
Generally happy with the PM who is also my MP, Gideon Osborne is fine as long as he shuts his mouth, thankfully he is miles ahead of that "credit card Chancellor" that left UK in tatters.

Overall I'm happy with the way things are, now I only want to see a clear policy on what shall happen after a withdrawal from the EU, harsher on crime especially petty crime, I also want to see less nonsense issues and more pressing issues addressed first, **** like gay marriages, women rights or their lack of or representation at boardrooms, feminist garbage etc should take a backseat, prefer they concentrate on far more pressing issues especially those that I could make money off
I generally agree. The bit I'd disagree with is the economic policy. Although I agree with your sentiments of do little, I'd still like to see economic policy and tax policy changed a little to make it a bit more stream lined. i.e. continue cutting the red tape. So carry on with what they're doing.
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Moosferatu
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You could put a dog in power against the party that made breaking into the middle-class economically unattractive and it'd still win.
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InnerTemple
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I think that the coalition overstated the case for their economic polices. They made it sound like that when they took control in 2010, the sky was about to fall down. They made it appear that we were in the position purely because of Labour's policies. They said that their ideas were the only way to get us out of the mess they said we were in.

None of these things were true, however the hysteria that the coalition managed to whip up allowed them to push through some incredibly unfair and ill thought out policies.

Additionally, for those still fooled by the coalition's confidence trick, it will be hard to evaluate the present government's time in office compared to Labour's time.

I won't be sad to see the Tories gone in 2015.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by InnerTemple)
I think that the coalition overstated the case for their economic polices. They made it sound like that when they took control in 2010, the sky was about to fall down. They made it appear that we were in the position purely because of Labour's policies. They said that their ideas were the only way to get us out of the mess they said we were in.

None of these things were true, however the hysteria that the coalition managed to whip up allowed them to push through some incredibly unfair and ill thought out policies.

Additionally, for those still fooled by the coalition's confidence trick, it will be hard to evaluate the present government's time in office compared to Labour's time.


I won't be said to see the Tories gone in 2015.

It wasn't just the coalition who was saying that. It was the IMF. And yes, it was quite bad when they took over.
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Alfissti
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(Original post by InnerTemple)
I think that the coalition overstated the case for their economic polices. They made it sound like that when they took control in 2010, the sky was about to fall down. They made it appear that we were in the position purely because of Labour's policies. They said that their ideas were the only way to get us out of the mess they said we were in. None of these things were true, however the hysteria that the coalition managed to whip up allowed them to push through some incredibly unfair and ill thought out policies.
In 2010 UK and Spain had the same rate for sovereign bonds, if it wasn't for the coalition policies UK won't be able to borrow at the current low rates. No need to trim the deficits? Sounds a lot of what that ******* Hollande is up to, why then is France now in tatters? If it wasn't Liebour's profligacy then whose fault would it be then?
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InnerTemple
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
And yes, it was quite bad when they took over.
A recovering economy? It has taken the Tories three years to get the economy back into the state that they inherited it in.
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loveslinus
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I feel I might get slaughtered for saying this - but who cares, it's what I think:

For me, the coalition has done nothing to protect local services, which - although New Labour made more than their fair share of idiotic and hurtful mistakes - is something that the previous Labour government got right in trying to maintain and protect these services. In my local area this has meant that children's services have been reduced dramatically, with sure start centres in deprived areas left underfunded, understaffed and only open for a few half-days a week. This obviously impacts on working families harshly. Additionally, the local council is now in a funding crisis and is in the process of reducing its workforce by 25%. No matter how government officials dress this up, it does affect service. Council spending has also been reduced enormously on Youth services. As a final point on local government, my local town hospital is also due to shut down and integrate with another 15 miles away. For us this is a big loss to the community, particularly for elder residents who rely on its close-to-home services. Of course some of these cuts are needed and would probably have been legislated by a Labour government, but the size and impact of these cuts have not been thought through and no attempts have been made to try and protect these vital services. This appreciation of local services was the main difference I encountered on my work experience last Summer - one with a majority Conservative, and the other Labour council.

The lack of the coalition's consideration over policy is particularly evident in the bedroom tax. Families with carers or foster children are not exempt from it. Clearly this could create huge negative impacts, as families simply can't afford to loose tax credits to save their "spare" room. The other problem with the tax is that there simply aren't enough one or two bedroom houses to go round as building goals created under Labour encouraged the building of family sized homes. Councils are reluctant to build more one and two bedroom homes as they know that there is in reality little demand for it, and the chances are that the policy will be abandoned if Labour wins the next election, which is looking increasingly likely. The bedroom tax was basically a rushed through policy to create votes, with no real consideration over its impact or application.

Finally, the government's lack of consideration is shown in its farming out to private firms - in particular ATOS. This French company now has the responsibility of determining whether or not people on disability allowance are fit to work. Even though I'm not a fan of privatisation, I can see that if this is a cost effective way of doing this then we should accept it. However, ATOS are employed to find as many people as possible as fit to work, working to strict quotas, even if this might not be the case. "The government's own figures revealed that 1,300 people had died after being told they should start preparing to go back to work, and another 2,200 had died before their assessment was complete." Michael Meacher MP. These figures should of course be scrutinised as they come from an opposition MP, but the fact is that several people have died as a result of these quotas. Again, this has probably occurred after government health assessments, but not on the same scale.

Basically, I do not think that most people are better off under the coalition. Economically this has been shown with working people on average £1500 worse off per year under the coalition. Furthermore, socially I think there has been a step backwards with the use of derogatory language like "workers and shirkers" to turn people against each other, and in particularly the unemployed. This does not help solve the problems the country faces.

Rant Over.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by InnerTemple)
A recovering economy? It has taken the Tories three years to get the economy back into the state that they inherited it in.
Sadly it wasn't a recovering economy. It was an economy that thought they'd got over the worse of it, but we hadn't. The euro crisis hit just after your 'recovering economy'.
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InnerTemple
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
The euro crisis hit just after your 'recovering economy'.
And the global banking crises hit during Labour's tenure. Before that one hit us, Labour had managed to get the 42% debt to GDP figure the Tories left behind in 1997 down to 35%. They also reduced the deficit left behind by the Tories too - everything was going very well.

Annoying how international events can upset the apple cart, isn't it?
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by InnerTemple)
And the global banking crises hit during Labour's tenure. Before that one hit us, Labour had managed to get the 42% debt to GDP figure the Tories left behind in 1997 down to 35%. They also reduced the deficit left behind by the Tories too - everything was going very well.

Annoying how international events can upset the apple cart, isn't it?
Yet still borrowed £20 billion a month even when there were boom times.
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InnerTemple
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
Yet still borrowed £20 billion a month even when there were boom times.
Did the Tories propose lower spending?

That's right: no, they didn't.
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Quady
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
Yet still borrowed £20 billion a month even when there were boom times.
huh - when?

The borrowing for 07/08 was projected as being £40bn before it all kicked off.
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Alfissti
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
I generally agree. The bit I'd disagree with is the economic policy. Although I agree with your sentiments of do little, I'd still like to see economic policy and tax policy changed a little to make it a bit more stream lined. i.e. continue cutting the red tape. So carry on with what they're doing.
Do as little as possible = interfere with the economy sparingly.

Deregulation and getting rid of red tape = working towards the goal above. Definitely a lot more can be done but it will take time especially with so many fire-fighting that goes on within the Coalition and also within the Conservative Party. I guess you could say that I'm willing to give the government time as such redtape are an amalgamation of 13 years of Liebour and EU work, it will take time to formulate new and far more efficient as well as effective policies and then dismantle the old junk and crappy ones.

Taxation, there is a lot more to do but it will also take time and I can understand it that it is an extremely delicate political balance. I will give it to them, they can't expect to cut taxes for the wealthier and still win and election.
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