Turn on thread page Beta
    • TSR Community Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    BA is recruiting for trainee pilots at the moment with this video of two sisters who work as crew.



    But, as the video says, hardly any airline pilots are women. Why do people think this is? Any female TSR members planning to train as pilots?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    More men do science degrees.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Why are most females put off from studying mathematics or physics?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Because they don't want to do it.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    It's not conducive to relationships and family life.

    Depending on your airlne/routes, you cannot make any kind of routine plans like doing the school run, planning to attend school concerts etc. You may find yourself seldom having a free weekend with little or no summer/easter/bank holiday leave which are normal working days.

    Unscheduled stopovers will be frequent and forced by bad weather, union strikes, mechanical/electrical failure, security alerts, volcanic dust etc. etc.

    Again, depending on your routes, you may find yourself with frequent stays way from home overseas, having to miss family Christmas and birthday's, anniversaries etc. Or if short haul, your roster can end when you are overseas so you still have to commute home!

    Time off will most likely be when no-one else is around - they are at work or at school.

    Continuously changing your body clock and spending a lot of time in a lower atmospheric pressure cabin will be fatiguing. Then there is the increased exposure at altitde to damaging and cancer indicing cosmic rays.

    And when called to do so, your first responsibility is to your passengers, crew and the public. That means putting their lives before your own.

    Money is not everything and unless you are prepared to put up with the inconveniences because your passion for flying overides them, then becoming a pilot is unlikely to be a good career choice.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Because the thought of being responsible for everyone on the plane's lives is too much :afraid:
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by uberteknik)
    It's not conducive to relationships and family life.

    Depending on your airlne/routes, you cannot make any kind of routine plans like doing the school run, planning to attend school concerts etc. You may find yourself seldom having a free weekend with little or no summer/easter/bank holiday leave which are normal working days.

    Unscheduled stopovers will be frequent and forced by bad weather, union strikes, mechanical/electrical failure, security alerts, volcanic dust etc. etc.

    Again, depending on your routes, you may find yourself with frequent stays way from home overseas, having to miss family Christmas and birthday's, anniversaries etc. Or if short haul, your roster can end when you are overseas so you still have to commute home!

    Time off will most likely be when no-one else is around - they are at work or at school.

    Continuously changing your body clock and spending a lot of time in a lower atmospheric pressure cabin will be fatiguing. Then there is the increased exposure at altitde to damaging and cancer indicing cosmic rays.

    And when called to do so, your first responsibility is to your passengers, crew and the public. That means putting their lives before your own.

    Money is not everything and unless you are prepared to put up with the inconveniences because your passion for flying overides them, then becoming a pilot is unlikely to be a good career choice.
    Sounds superficially a sensible explanation. But it has one rather fatal flaw.

    Flight hostesses.

    There is a huge skew in flight hostesses towards female rather than male and they have all the same problems you listed, except with much less reward.

    It's a cultural thing. Boy's are conditioned from early childhood to want to fly planes and drive diggers (all boy's toyboxes will include an airplane and a digger). Girls are conditioned to want to serve/cook food, look after kids and cut hair/do makeup. (Dolls houses, toy ovens and dolls).
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Amy Johnson was a female pilot....
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    It is still considered as a "degree for men" in many societies, and If I'm not mistaken, quite a number of airline companies do not accept female pilots, because my friend, who's a girl, originally wanted to be a pilot as well, but after doing a lot of researches, she concluded that it is quite a hard degree for female to pursue. My other friend, who's a female AND studied in the flight academy to be a pilot, is the only girl in her entire course... so in terms of attitude towards women in the working field perhaps? Even if they accept female pilot, many companies are still bias and prefers "traditional" male pilots and maybe perhaps in terms of socializing in the flight academy for women...
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Part of it is the women themselves - they've got no-one really to look up at as role models, for whatever reason it's not seen as a viable career.
    Part of it is the public. A recent poll said over 50% of the public (including other women) would be less confident in a female pilot than a male.

    I know many pilots, both civil and military and overwhelmingly they are male. The job itself is a major commitment, getting a position is rarer than rocking horse poo and it costs an absolute fortune.


    (Original post by wildrover)
    More men do science degrees.
    (Original post by BWV1007)
    Why are most females put off from studying mathematics or physics?
    Irrelevant. You don't need science degrees (or any degrees) or high level of Maths and Physics to be a Pilot. GCSE level Maths and Physics is more than adequate.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sosadsosad)
    Because the thought of being responsible for everyone on the plane's lives is too much :afraid:
    Because you don't get female doctors and nurses? Females are just too fragile to manage such a big responsibility :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Cockpit within a cockpit.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by uberteknik)
    And when called to do so, your first responsibility is to your passengers, crew and the public. That means putting their lives before your own.
    Nonsense. You're putting no-one's lives above your own. Sure, as a pilot-in-command you're responsible for those on board, but you're also keeping yourself alive. It's self preservation.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    Because you don't get female doctors and nurses? Females are just too fragile to manage such a big responsibility :rolleyes:
    I was speaking for myself :sigh:
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hanvyj)
    Because you don't get female doctors and nurses? Females are just too fragile to manage such a big responsibility :rolleyes:
    I don't have any statistics to back it up but the impression I get is that the higher pressure roles such as micro surgery are still dominated by men. I do think men cope better under pressure than women, hence why men out performed women in maths when coursework was scrapped. I don't think that's why there aren't many airline pilots though.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Here we go 51% of British public don't trust female pilots
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by uberteknik)
    It's not conducive to relationships and family life.

    Depending on your airlne/routes, you cannot make any kind of routine plans like doing the school run, planning to attend school concerts etc. You may find yourself seldom having a free weekend with little or no summer/easter/bank holiday leave which are normal working days.

    Unscheduled stopovers will be frequent and forced by bad weather, union strikes, mechanical/electrical failure, security alerts, volcanic dust etc. etc.

    Again, depending on your routes, you may find yourself with frequent stays way from home overseas, having to miss family Christmas and birthday's, anniversaries etc. Or if short haul, your roster can end when you are overseas so you still have to commute home!

    Time off will most likely be when no-one else is around - they are at work or at school.

    Continuously changing your body clock and spending a lot of time in a lower atmospheric pressure cabin will be fatiguing. Then there is the increased exposure at altitde to damaging and cancer indicing cosmic rays.

    And when called to do so, your first responsibility is to your passengers, crew and the public. That means putting their lives before your own.

    Money is not everything and unless you are prepared to put up with the inconveniences because your passion for flying overides them, then becoming a pilot is unlikely to be a good career choice.

    Don't a lot of those also apply to cabin crew though?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wildrover)
    I don't have any statistics to back it up but the impression I get is that the higher pressure roles such as micro surgery are still dominated by men. I do think men cope better under pressure than women, hence why men out performed women in maths when coursework was scrapped. I don't think that's why there aren't many airline pilots though.
    Not so sure about this. Mathematical discoveries are usually achieved in low pressure situations where the mathematician takes things at his own pace. I think women simply don't have the same brain as men. It's better for certain tasks, but worse for others.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It's just not viewed as a woman's job, it's just one of those societal norms.
    I remember watching a documentary once about a female air pilot and the amount of discrimination they receive is quite substantial. A lot of people were more uneasy because a woman was flying, and I think one man was close to refusing to fly because of it.

    A lot of people are nervous when flying, and they want security and comfort- having a traditional, 'expected' air pilot probably provides more comfort.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by elohssa)
    Not so sure about this. Mathematical discoveries are usually achieved in low pressure situations where the mathematician takes things at his own pace. I think women simply don't have the same brain as men. It's better for certain tasks, but worse for others.
    I think it is almost 100% how you are brought up as children and the culture we live in. Girls just aren't pushed to do the same things boys are. They get rewarded for different things in early childhood, throughout school. The toys we give them are huge examples of how we shape them.

    Also, simply the fact that there are no female mathematicians, pilots or scientists so it's not likely girls will see it as an option. Ask a kid what they want to be when they grow up. A lot of them pick what their same-sex parents, favorite celebrities or relatives do.

    Then someone comes along and says their 'brain can't do it' anyway and what's the point in even trying?
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.