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    Posted as undergrad because it's beyond the A Level syllabus.

    I know they have a charge, a spin and a mass which makes me think they are small 'particles'.

    I think my question is 'what is the nature of a quark?' but I really don't know. They're strange (ha)!

    I don't understand what gives it it's charge. What exactly is it made of?:erm:
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    What is an electrons charge made of?

    Think you might need string theory/ at least the 4th spacial dimension to answer that?
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    (Original post by Davelittle)
    What is an electrons charge made of?

    Think you might need string theory/ at least the 4th spacial dimension to answer that?
    I don't know. I first wondered about this when I was curious about what charge actually was last year in AS phyics. I was following the charge down as far as I could but got stuck at quark

    Seriously? :sigh:
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    I don't know. That's what I'm trying to figure out I think. I was following the charge down as far as I could but got stuck at quark

    Seriously? :sigh:
    Yeah I don't think we fully understand what makes "charge" as I'm fairly sure we can only properly explain the electrostatic force as a disturbance in the fourth dimension (correct me if I am wrong)
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    (Original post by Davelittle)
    Yeah I don't think we fully understand what makes "charge" as I'm fairly sure we can only properly explain the electrostatic force as a disturbance in the fourth dimension (correct me if I am wrong)
    Well, that sucks. Maybe I'll end up researching it some day! :awesome:

    Thanks for answering
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Posted as undergrad because it's beyond the A Level syllabus.

    I know they have a charge, a spin and a mass which makes me think they are small 'particles'.

    I think my question is 'what is the nature of a quark?' but I really don't know. They're strange (ha)!

    I don't understand what gives it it's charge. What exactly is it made of?:erm:
    We don't really know, it's like with electrons. If you know about wave-particle duality, then we can't really say that something is always a particle for definite. There are a number of theories as to what actually composes a quark - one idea is that everything is a string, and the way the string vibrates determines what type of particle it appears as (electron, quark etc.). For that idea to work mathematically there must be more spacial dimensions than we can experience, but it would explain why gravity is so weak (it is strong in the dimensions we can't interact with).
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Posted as undergrad because it's beyond the A Level syllabus.

    I know they have a charge, a spin and a mass which makes me think they are small 'particles'.

    I think my question is 'what is the nature of a quark?' but I really don't know. They're strange (ha)!

    I don't understand what gives it it's charge. What exactly is it made of?:erm:
    This probably doesn't answer your question, but it's a pretty amazing song:

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    (Original post by tory88)
    We don't really know, it's like with electrons. If you know about wave-particle duality, then we can't really say that something is always a particle for definite. There are a number of theories as to what actually composes a quark - one idea is that everything is a string, and the way the string vibrates determines what type of particle it appears as (electron, quark etc.). For that idea to work mathematically there must be more spacial dimensions than we can experience, but it would explain why gravity is so weak (it is strong in the dimensions we can't interact with).
    Then what the hell else is in those dimensions, I wonder :lolwut:
    Just going to put it out there. Physics is awesome :ahee:
    (Original post by brittanna)
    This probably doesn't answer your question, but it's a pretty amazing song:

    Hahaha! Did you click the link to giraffe sex after that too? :mmm:
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Posted as undergrad because it's beyond the A Level syllabus.

    I know they have a charge, a spin and a mass which makes me think they are small 'particles'.

    I think my question is 'what is the nature of a quark?' but I really don't know. They're strange (ha)!

    I don't understand what gives it it's charge. What exactly is it made of?:erm:
    As with all things in physics, the units chosen for describing the properties of matter are all arbitrary and historical. No-one can tell you why they exist or what a particle actually is or why they exert forces and do what they do.

    We have to be content with observation and prediction of observation only and come up with ways and words to describe that behaviour referenced to some other predictable, stable and repeatable standard of measurement.

    Of course we can predict behaviour to a high degree of precision which manifests in technology and all if the benefits that accrues.

    There are fundamental forces which behave very differently to each other and interact with matter in different ways.

    Gravity is always attractive. Charge can either repel or attract but does not interact with uncharged particles etc. The range and magnitide of the forces is also vastly different. Gravity is 1036 times weaker than the electric force for instance.

    Particle physics is like a russian doll. Pull off the head and there is something else inside. No-one can tell you where it will end, all we can do is make predictions based on observation and then test those predictions.

    Taken to the extreme, that ends up in experiments like the Large Hadron Collider etc.

    A laymans guide and a start: http://youtu.be/HVxBdMxgVX0
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Then what the hell else is in those dimensions, I wonder :lolwut:
    Just going to put it out there. Physics is awesome :ahee:


    Hahaha! Did you click the link to giraffe sex after that too? :mmm:
    The first time I watched it I did yeah . I don't think it's actually possible to pass up on an opportunity to learn about giraffe sex :nah:.
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Then what the hell else is in those dimensions, I wonder :lolwut:
    Just going to put it out there. Physics is awesome :ahee:


    Hahaha! Did you click the link to giraffe sex after that too? :mmm:
    This is completely unrelated, but did you get the idea for your username from House?
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    (Original post by brittanna)
    This is completely unrelated, but did you get the idea for your username from House?
    I got the idea from learning about Occam's razor in science
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    As with all things in physics, the units chosen for describing the properties of matter are all arbitrary and historical. No-one can tell you why they exist or what a particle actually is or why they exert forces and do what they do.

    We have to be content with observation and prediction of observation only and come up with ways and words to describe that behaviour referenced to some other predictable, stable and repeatable standard of measurement.

    Of course we can predict behaviour to a high degree of precision which manifests in technology and all if the benefits that accrues.

    There are fundamental forces which behave very differently to each other and interact with matter in different ways.

    Gravity is always attractive. Charge can either repel or attract but does not interact with uncharged particles etc. The range and magnitide of the forces is also vastly different. Gravity is 1036 times weaker than the electric force for instance.

    Particle physics is like a russian doll. Pull off the head and there is something else inside. No-one can tell you where it will end, all we can do is make predictions based on observation and then test those predictions.

    Taken to the extreme, that ends up in experiments like the Large Hadron Collider etc.

    A laymans guide and a start: http://youtu.be/HVxBdMxgVX0
    Thanks a lot!

    I appreciate that each new thing we understand presents more questions than it answers but I wasn't sure if we understood what charge was yet and that's sort of what I was aiming to get out of this
    Now I know that we don't really know, I can sit back in awe at it all!

    A sidenote: I think I once watched a documentary where they said that gravity could theoretically work in reverse too

    Cheers for the link. I'll check it out! :yep:
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Then what the hell else is in those dimensions, I wonder :lolwut:
    Just going to put it out there. Physics is awesome :ahee:
    It's something we can't comprehend. Imagine living in a world of two spacial dimensions, forwards and backwards and left and right. We would have no concept of what up and down were, so we could never understand what the third spacial dimension could be.
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    (Original post by tory88)
    It's something we can't comprehend. Imagine living in a world of two spacial dimensions, forwards and backwards and left and right. We would have no concept of what up and down were, so we could never understand what the third spacial dimension could be.
    Sure. It's all mathematical right now
    My question was more rhetorical. I was just pondering there being 'stuff' in the other dimensions that we are not aware of

    EDIT: I like to think of it like a bird flying over a building and only seeing the 2d 'birds-eye-view' because it means that we only need to find a way to change the height of our flight to see how tall it is too
    Then again, a bird can also see it's height relative to other buildings. I wonder if that means anything useful!

    (Original post by uberteknik)
    A laymans guide and a start: http://youtu.be/HVxBdMxgVX0
    That link just taught me that the strong nuclear force has a mass! :curious: Cool!
 
 
 

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