Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Arabic is ranked as a more important language for children to learn in school than French in a report published by the British Council today.

    The study, Languages for the Future, also rates Mandarin as more vital than German to the UK over the next 20 years. Spanish, though, is considered the most important language to learn.

    The report calls on policymakers to introduce a broader range of languages into every child's education.

    "The problem isn't that we're teaching the wrong languages because the most widely-taught languages like French, Spanish and German all feature in our top ten," said John Worne, director of strategy at the British Council, the UK's international organisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations.

    "But the UK needs more people to take up the opportunity to learn and, crucially, get using these languages - along with new ones like Arabic, Chinese and Japanese.

    "If we don't act to tackle this shortfall, we'll lose out both economically and culturally. Schools have their job to do but it's also a problem of complacency, confidence and culture - which policy makers, businesses, parents and everyone else in the UK can help to fix."

    The British Council report compiled its top 10 of the most useful languages to learn by using a sophisticated ranking system - which gave weight for current export links with the countries concerned, UK government trade priorities, diplomatic and security priorities and holiday destinations.

    It concluded the UK had an "alarming" shortage of people able to speak any of the 10 languages identified - with three-quarters of the population unable to speak any of the languages fluently enough to hold a conversation in them.

    French was the only language where fluent speakers were in double figures (15 per cent). It was followed by German (six per cent), Spanish (four per cent) Italian (two per cent) and Arabic, Mandarin, Russian and Japanese (all one per cent). Fewer than one in 100 could speak Portuguese or Turkish, which made up the 10.

    According to figures from the Joint Council for Qualification - the umbrella body representing exam boards, less than half of GCSE students (44 per cent) took a language exam this summer despite an improvement on recent years.

    Even football chiefs joined in the condemnation of the UK's performance in languages with Martyn Heather, head of education at the Premier League, warning a lack of language skills would make it difficult for UK players to play or coach abroad.

    "Language skills are just as important for a young aspiring footballer as they are for someone who wants to enter the world of international commerce," he added.

    "Being able to speak another language opens up a world of opportunities to play and coach in football leagues across the globe."

    On Arabic, the report said: "Six Arabic speaking countries appear among the UK's top 50 export market in goods with a combined value to the economy of over £12 billion - more than the value of UK exports to Spain, China or Italy ..

    "Arabic has emerged as one of the priority languages for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. It is their intention to increase the number of diplomats trained in Arabic by 40 per cent."

    On Mandarin, it adds: "Given its rapid growth and status as a major emerging power, the business opportunities and challenges in China are great."

    A spokesman for the Department for Education said its reforms - masking languages compulsory from the age of seven and included it as a compulsory subject for the English Baccalaureate league table ranking - "will ensure that hundreds and thousands more young people will study languages every year".

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/ed...n-8949872.html
    Get learning

    The possibilities in Arabic for the use of figurative language are endless; its allusiveness, tropes and figures of speech place it far beyond the reach of any other language... Arabic loses on translation but all other languages gain on being translated into Arabic - Joel Carmichael, The Shaping of the Arabs
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    No thanks. I have absolutely zero intention of ever going anywhere near Saudi Arabia.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Cute.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ill learn arabic if u convert to judaism
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    akhlalsad bakhaa habibi akkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkhhhhhhhhhhh hmed habib habibi

    but seriously, do you really expect brits to learn arabic? nah not gonna happen and it sounds too violent anyway
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    I think that Arabic looks really pretty, but it wouldn't ever be useful to me.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Yep


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    'Twould be interesting but I think Arabic's major shortfall is that it's written one way, spoken another and then there are further quite large dialectual differences depending on where one is, all culminating in one large confusing mess... I would probably prefer to learn Farsi instead...
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    kkkkkkaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaakkkkkkk kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkka aakkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk kkkkkkkkkaaakkkkkkkkkchchchchchc hchkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk kkkkkkk habibibabib. This is coming from somebody who speaks Urdu and Punjabi and finds Arabic to be horribly difficult and generally horribly sounding when learning.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ornlu)
    'Twould be interesting but I think Arabic's major shortfall is that it's written one way, spoken another and then there are further quite large dialectual differences depending on where one is, all culminating in one large confusing mess... I would probably prefer to learn Farsi instead...
    That's exactly the same for Mandarin, but worse :p: I know Arabic and am leaning Mandarin at university. I don't see why anyone would want to learn one but not the other, except arabic has a more latin style system with it's alphabet, so is actually far easier.
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Greenlaner)
    No thanks. I have absolutely zero intention of ever going anywhere near Saudi Arabia.
    My bad too sleepy xD plus coursework!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    لول

    No. British kids should learn German, Latin and Spanish. Not in that order – German and Latin because between them they give a very thorough understanding of our own language, and Spanish because it is perhaps the best combination of future relevance and ease of acquisition. Chinese is too difficult for most children. French is a pointless comparison – it was born out of the days when most kids just went to France on holiday as it was closest. Arabic makes no sense at all.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Al-Mudaari)
    Get learning

    The possibilities in Arabic for the use of figurative language are endless; its allusiveness, tropes and figures of speech place it far beyond the reach of any other language... Arabic loses on translation but all other languages gain on being translated into Arabic - Joel Carmichael, The Shaping of the Arabs
    If I learn Arabic will you learn how to use English correctly?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    to speak arabac learn one word

    Allah, ALLLAAHH, and ALLLLLLLLLLLLLAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHH HHH

    that will comprimise about 75% of all words spoken in arabic
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Plainview)
    No. British kids should learn German, Latin and Spanish. Not in that order – German and Latin because between them they give a very thorough understanding of our own language, and Spanish because it is perhaps the best combination of future relevance and ease of acquisition. Chinese is too difficult for most children. French is a pointless comparison – it was born out of the days when most kids just went to France on holiday as it was closest. Arabic makes no sense at all.
    Spanish is the only language worth learning if for someone who's afraid they can't learn a language quickly. Latin has a lot to it, I'm still learning German, but that's only because I want to do a year abroad at Zurich, the language in itself isn't very useful.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by lNurl)
    Not even to Dubai?) Its my dream to go to Dubai that city is built for tourist only
    Dubai isn't in KSA :facepalm:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Aristotle's' Disciple)
    Spanish is the only language worth learning if for someone who's afraid they can't learn a language quickly. Latin has a lot to it, I'm still learning German, but that's only because I want to do a year abroad at Zurich, the language in itself isn't very useful.
    How do your points about Spanish and German make any sense? Spanish is a global language, with significant bases in the US and flourishing South America, not to mention Europe. German has strong links to our own language, and with Latin would give a much better understanding about how our own language works. Germany is also rather powerful. And Switzerland's nice.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Al-Mudaari)
    Get learning

    The possibilities in Arabic for the use of figurative language are endless; its allusiveness, tropes and figures of speech place it far beyond the reach of any other language... Arabic loses on translation but all other languages gain on being translated into Arabic - Joel Carmichael, The Shaping of the Arabs
    I have absolutely no intention of learning Arabic. It's not like I'm going to need it seeing as the countries that speak it are as socially backwards as the writing direction and I have no intention of ever visiting them.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Most people in the UK can barely grasp English with any fluency, good luck with Arabic
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Plainview)
    How do your points about Spanish and German make any sense? Spanish is a global language, with significant bases in the US and flourishing South America, not to mention Europe. German has strong links to our own language, and with Latin would give a much better understanding about how our own language works. Germany is also rather powerful. And Switzerland's nice.
    Germany is powerful, but you could get by with English well enough, I suppose I'm talking relatively, and with that in mind, South AMERICA* has huge potential for development in the future. From that perspective I think Spanish has a huge edge over any language, taking into account it's difficulty. I may attempt to learn it one day, but I have more immediate interests in studying in China and Switzerland so.

    EDIT: South AMERICA, my mistake :p:
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.