Gem?? Please help Watch

aftermath.
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Hey guys,

I needed some information about GEM.

Actually I've decided to do a bachelors degree in psychology at uni, but I may want to go into psychiatry later.

So can I get some further information on that, as in how I can get into that with psychology and what the GEM is all about and if I do that then typically how long will it take for me to finish my education and become a psychiatrist?
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Quin87
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Why don't you take a gap year and reapply for medicine, if that's what you want to do? Do you more want to work in therapy, or more specialise with medication etc? as a psychiatrist, some do specialise in psychotherapy, but it's much more likely your job will centre around diagnostics and medication etc

If you go GEM route (which is far more competitive than undergrad) you'd then have to do 4/5 years at med school, then your 2 foundation years as a junior dr, and then only after that can you apply to do a specialist training post in psychiatry.


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skotch
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(Original post by aftermath.)
Hey guys,

I needed some information about GEM.

Actually I've decided to do a bachelors degree in psychology at uni, but I may want to go into psychiatry later.

So can I get some further information on that, as in how I can get into that with psychology and what the GEM is all about and if I do that then typically how long will it take for me to finish my education and become a psychiatrist?
Hey, I did my undergraduate degree in psychology and am now applying for graduate medicine (GEM).

GEM is 4 years long, just one year shorter than a standard medicine course. You're essentially doing the equivalent of the first two years of the standard course in one year. So it's very intense. It's also far more competitive to get into than standard entry courses.

To go into psychiatry you'll need to obviously finish the GEM course, then complete the two foundation training years, then apply for the psychiatry specialty training. This takes 6 years, 3 years of 'core training' (CT1-CT3) and 3 years of 'higher training' (ST4-ST6); you are then eligible to apply for consultant posts. However, this is if you pass all the exams first time round and if you're actually ready to take the exams.

In general, a psychology degree is good, but can restrict you in medicine terms in the respect that there are fewer universities that accept psychology graduates on graduate entry courses than those with a life science degree. I'd say a degree in physiology, anatomy, or neuroscience would be a much better option. Psychology is in no way needed for psychiatry.

I found the lack of 'hardcore' science in psychology rather frustrating. There were some great modules but so much of it is theoretical and the many differing perspectives one can take for each topic leads you in circles, often we don't know the actual answers to the issues being debated. Psychology is still very much a newer science and it is clear that it is still very much deep-rooted in its philosophical past.

I enjoyed my degree because it was interesting and the hours are few, meaning I could do lots of extra-curriculars, but I realised in my final year that it wasn't the best suited degree for me.

If you're looking into medicine and psychology now, I would choose medicine over psychology without a doubt.

Sorry for my hash of a message, I just wrote stuff down as it came to me.

If you've got any questions about psychology or medicine, feel free to ask!
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aftermath.
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Thank you Quin87 and Skotch for the help ^^
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aftermath.
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(Original post by skotch)
Hey, I did my undergraduate degree in psychology and am now applying for graduate medicine (GEM).

GEM is 4 years long, just one year shorter than a standard medicine course. You're essentially doing the equivalent of the first two years of the standard course in one year. So it's very intense. It's also far more competitive to get into than standard entry courses.

To go into psychiatry you'll need to obviously finish the GEM course, then complete the two foundation training years, then apply for the psychiatry specialty training. This takes 6 years, 3 years of 'core training' (CT1-CT3) and 3 years of 'higher training' (ST4-ST6); you are then eligible to apply for consultant posts. However, this is if you pass all the exams first time round and if you're actually ready to take the exams.

In general, a psychology degree is good, but can restrict you in medicine terms in the respect that there are fewer universities that accept psychology graduates on graduate entry courses than those with a life science degree. I'd say a degree in physiology, anatomy, or neuroscience would be a much better option. Psychology is in no way needed for psychiatry.

I found the lack of 'hardcore' science in psychology rather frustrating. There were some great modules but so much of it is theoretical and the many differing perspectives one can take for each topic leads you in circles, often we don't know the actual answers to the issues being debated. Psychology is still very much a newer science and it is clear that it is still very much deep-rooted in its philosophical past.

I enjoyed my degree because it was interesting and the hours are few, meaning I could do lots of extra-curriculars, but I realised in my final year that it wasn't the best suited degree for me.

If you're looking into medicine and psychology now, I would choose medicine over psychology without a doubt.

Sorry for my hash of a message, I just wrote stuff down as it came to me.

If you've got any questions about psychology or medicine, feel free to ask!
Hey there ) that really helps so thanks once again ^^ well I'm kinda confused atm, I really wanna do psychology at uni but then psychiatry as a career really appeals to me and so I'm really frustrated about this lol. But then again with psychology I could always go into clinical psychology and become a clinical psychologist. I wouldn't mind doing medicine, but psychology is a subject I am really passionate about and one that I really enjoy, so I think I would be much better off doing that.

What topics did you get to study throughout your degree?

Btw do you need a PHD in psychology to become a clinical psychologist?
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