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    Right, I've been at university for 8-9 weeks now? And Law is dreadful.
    I've been stressed since like..week 2 and was told that it'd all get better and I'd be used to it all.
    I AM used to the workload now - I've been keeping on top of the case readings and I'm starting to get the gist of it all. But I've noticed that I don't enjoy it. I just feel like I'm doing the degree for career prospect as opposed to English; the whole "Law sounds better on paper than English" thing I've been told by everyone around me.
    I feel like all my interest in studying Law that has built up these past few years have just vanished after starting uni!
    The changing-course deadline was a couple of weeks ago which in my opinion, was too early because the law seminars/lectures didn't start until 2 weeks after Freshers Week. This didn't give me near enough time to experience lectures/seminars and decide if this is the course for me. I'm sure if I begged, I could change courses...but the question is, should I change to English Lit and Creative Writing?
    I'm sure I'd enjoy it more. I'm better at it too, an A* in English compared to an A in Law. I worked hard and naturally achieved the A* in English without resits. For Law, the only reason I got an A is because I can memorise huge chunks of information and had the chance to resit lots of times.
    I really don't want to re-apply next year too! I'm still in my first term, there should be a chance to change courses.

    Job-wise, is it a good idea to switch courses? I could always do a conversion course, right? From English to Law?
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    I initially choose law after doing really well at A level after about 2 weeks into my course realised it really wasn't for me. Most the people doing it were supposedly in it for the "money". Just have a good think, you can always do English and then do a GDL which is quite popular.

    I'd rather do 1-2 years of law than 3 unhappy years.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I initially choose law after doing really well at A level after about 2 weeks into my course realised it really isn't for me. Most the people doing it were supposedly in it for the "money". Just have a good think, you can always do English and then do a GDL which is quite popular.

    I'd rather do 1-2 years of law than 3 unhappy years.
    I keep saying I'm interested in human rights and want to do Law "to make a difference" but I know I'm kidding myself.
    I'm hoping it's not too late! I really wouldn't mind spending hours catching up on everything I've missed English-wise, as opposed to Law!
    Is a GDL a good idea for me?
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    I hated Law throughout my first-year and I was contemplating quitting the course several times. It was a few weeks into my second-year, when I really started enjoying the subject. By the time I got to third-year, there was nothing else I wanted to do.

    When they say 'you get used to it', they don't mean in 8-9 weeks. What you're describing is that you've learnt to handle the workload, it takes a good year to really develop an interest in law, sometimes more. Some people take to it like fish to water and are brilliant at it from Day One. But others, like myself, need more time to acclimate.

    There are always modules you like in Law and those that you dislike. For me, first-year comprised of every single nightmarish module that bored me to tears (Criminal, Contracts, Tort, Public/Constitutional). Second-year brought some options and I loved my options (Public International and IT law) and really enjoyed studying EU law as well. Third-year, I think I was happiest when I was writing my dissertation, alongside studying IP law, in which I found my true love and passion.

    It took a while, but I finally really started enjoying Law.

    Thought I'd give you an alternate perspective from someone who's been exactly where you are and stuck it out to the end and is happier for it.

    Arrowhead.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    I hated Law throughout my first-year and I was contemplating quitting the course several times. It was a few weeks into my second-year, when I really started enjoying the subject. By the time I got to third-year, there was nothing else I wanted to do.

    When they say 'you get used to it', they don't mean in 8-9 weeks. What you're describing is that you've learnt to handle the workload, it takes a good year to really develop an interest in law, sometimes more. Some people take to it like fish to water and are brilliant at it from Day One. But others, like myself, need more time to acclimate.

    There are always modules you like in Law and those that you dislike. For me, first-year comprised of every single nightmarish module that bored me to tears (Criminal, Contracts, Tort, Public/Constitutional). Second-year brought some options and I loved my options (Public International and IT law) and really enjoyed studying EU law as well. Third-year, I think I was happiest when I was writing my dissertation, alongside studying IP law, in which I found my true love and passion.

    It took a while, but I finally really started enjoying Law.

    Thought I'd give you an alternate perspective from someone who's been exactly where you are and stuck it out to the end and is happier for it.

    Arrowhead.
    What about the fact that I wasn't contemplating a legal profession anyway? It sounds silly but even when I did work experience, I hated it. But my insistence of wanting to "learn more about Law" kept me going but what if I don't like it by the end of the year? I'll have to re-apply and I really don't want to do that. I know A-levels don't compare, but I still enjoyed English Lit more. I don't want to be a lawyer, that's for sure, but whether the legal profession in any other field is for me, who knows?
    Wouldn't a GDL be the best option for me because then I'd have the degree I love to fall back on but if I wanted to change my mind, I could still do Law?
    I honestly don't think I can get through the next couple of months at this rate. It's so dry.
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    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    What about the fact that I wasn't contemplating a legal profession anyway? It sounds silly but even when I did work experience, I hated it. But my insistence of wanting to "learn more about Law" kept me going but what if I don't like it by the end of the year? I'll have to re-apply and I really don't want to do that. I know A-levels don't compare, but I still enjoyed English Lit more. I don't want to be a lawyer, that's for sure, but whether the legal profession in any other field is for me, who knows?
    Wouldn't a GDL be the best option for me because then I'd have the degree I love to fall back on but if I wanted to change my mind, I could still do Law?
    I honestly don't think I can get through the next couple of months at this rate. It's so dry.
    It's quite clear that you've already made up your mind. What's stopping you from going ahead and making the change then?
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    It's quite clear that you've already made up your mind. What's stopping you from going ahead and making the change then?
    Being Asian.
    As stupendous as it sounds. My dad won't be pleased. Neither will all my relatives.
    The pressure of that is worrying me.
    I have this silly notion that I'm studying law "to make a difference" and "go into human rights law" and all that **** but I know it's just words.
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    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    Being Asian.
    As stupendous as it sounds. My dad won't be pleased. Neither will all my relatives.
    The pressure of that is worrying me.
    I have this silly notion that I'm studying law "to make a difference" and "go into human rights law" and all that **** but I know it's just words.
    The Asian thing I understand. I'm Asian too and when I first mentioned dropping law in the summer after my first-year, let's just say that my dad had things to say that will haunt me forever. I'm not sure I have anything to offer in that regard that will be helpful, but if you're genuinely miserable, there's no reason to keep putting yourself through that misery.

    If you know your spiel about wanting to "make a difference" is rubbish, I don't see how that has anything to do with Law either. A close friend of mine in my law course hated the course, but being Asian (similar reasoning as you) dropping out was not an option for her. She eventually did Tax and Company Law options and is now pursuing a career in finance. Another friend of mine hated her law degree and after graduating has gone down the media/management route.

    A degree is just a degree after all. With a law degree, you have quite a few alternative careers available to you.

    But the decision to actually do something about your situation is ultimately yours. I will say though that your 'dislike' of the dry nature of the law and desire to "learn about/study the law" and your interest in it disappearing are not uncommon. Many of my friends, including myself, felt exactly like you did. Almost all of us stuck it out. I would say 7/10 people I know who stuck it out eventually started liking/loving the subject.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    The Asian thing I understand. I'm Asian too and when I first mentioned dropping law in the summer after my first-year, let's just say that my dad had things to say that will haunt me forever. I'm not sure I have anything to offer in that regard that will be helpful, but if you're genuinely miserable, there's no reason to keep putting yourself through that misery.

    If you know your spiel about wanting to "make a difference" is rubbish, I don't see how that has anything to do with Law either. A close friend of mine in my law course hated the course, but being Asian (similar reasoning as you) dropping out was not an option for her. She eventually did Tax and Company Law options and is now pursuing a career in finance. Another friend of mine hated her law degree and after graduating has gone down the media/management route.

    A degree is just a degree after all. With a law degree, you have quite a few alternative careers available to you.

    But the decision to actually do something about your situation is ultimately yours. I will say though that your 'dislike' of the dry nature of the law and desire to "learn about/study the law" and your interest in it disappearing are not uncommon. Many of my friends, including myself, felt exactly like you did. Almost all of us stuck it out. I would say 7/10 people I know who stuck it out eventually started liking/loving the subject.
    Just took a quick look at your profile and you got a 1st from LSE?! That's brilliant.
    The competitiveness of law is also something which puts me off. I'm fairly smart but not enough to get a 2:1 even. That's what it feels like.
    I'm glad you understand the Asian thing though, I really appreciate it.
    I'm not dismissing Law completely. But the GDL thing isn't going away. I'm just thinking about how I can go from English to Law if need be.
    Unfortunately, the option doesn't exist the other way around. I can't do Law to English, which is annoying. So if I have to make a decision, I need to do it as soon as I can.

    Also, I don't think I'd have minded Law that much if extra-curricular events weren't revolved around the lawyer profession. Every career event that we get emailed about is to do with law firms and speaking to barristers or judge presentations. If they attempt to convince us that we can go down a non-legal career path, why aren't we being provided with more opportunities to help us with that? Or is that something specific to my university?

    Sorry about this. I just keep coming back with more questions instead of accepting what you've written...
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    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    The competitiveness of law is also something which puts me off. I'm fairly smart but not enough to get a 2:1 even. That's what it feels like.
    Getting a 2:1 is really not that hard. It's not got much to do with intelligence or anything, for a 2:1 you just need to have a decent grasp of the content and should be able to regurgitate it to some extent. It's when you want to go beyond the 65-mark and towards a First that things get hard.

    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    I'm glad you understand the Asian thing though, I really appreciate it.
    I'm not dismissing Law completely. But the GDL thing isn't going away. I'm just thinking about how I can go from English to Law if need be.
    I don't know why you're consoling yourself with the GDL when you've openly stated that you don't care for the legal profession anyway? You won't study the law like you do in a law degree in the GDL. Also, I doubt you'd want to do the GDL without making sure it's funded, it is an expensive course.

    The only way to ensure it's funded is to have a law firm give you a TC as a non-law student (or an Inns of Court scholarship if you're going down the Bar route). How are you going to explain to them that you want a legal career but dropped out of a law degree because you found it boring? That doesn't exactly inspire confidence in a prospective legal employer/scholarship provider.

    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    Also, I don't think I'd have minded Law that much if extra-curricular events weren't revolved around the lawyer profession. Every career event that we get emailed about is to do with law firms and speaking to barristers or judge presentations. If they attempt to convince us that we can go down a non-legal career path, why aren't we being provided with more opportunities to help us with that? Or is that something specific to my university?
    Think about it this way: You voluntarily signed up for a Law degree. It is presumed that you want to strongly consider a career in law. Most of the students on your course probably do want to become solicitors/barristers. Hence, the work experience/extracurricular opportunities are provided to cater to the interests of the majority. If you're looking for alternative routes, sign up for societies that organise such events. I was an active member in the Emerging Markets society at the LSE and that got me introduced to a lot of banks/finance practices. I eventually decided I wanted nothing to do with finance, but that was a decision I came to after exploring the profession.

    What do you want to do though? I think that's the biggest problem in that you're not sure what you want to do after your degree.
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    You would be much better doing a degree you like, getting a good result and then doing the GDL if you still want to be a solicitor. Firms don't really care about law vs non law degrees. As an aside, I used to supervise trainees when I was a lawyer and most of the really good ones (of about 18) had non law degrees.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    Getting a 2:1 is really not that hard. It's not got much to do with intelligence or anything, for a 2:1 you just need to have a decent grasp of the content and should be able to regurgitate it to some extent. It's when you want to go beyond the 65-mark and towards a First that things get hard.



    I don't know why you're consoling yourself with the GDL when you've openly stated that you don't care for the legal profession anyway? You won't study the law like you do in a law degree in the GDL. Also, I doubt you'd want to do the GDL without making sure it's funded, it is an expensive course.

    The only way to ensure it's funded is to have a law firm give you a TC as a non-law student (or an Inns of Court scholarship if you're going down the Bar route). How are you going to explain to them that you want a legal career but dropped out of a law degree because you found it boring? That doesn't exactly inspire confidence in a prospective legal employer/scholarship provider.



    Think about it this way: You voluntarily signed up for a Law degree. It is presumed that you want to strongly consider a career in law. Most of the students on your course probably do want to become solicitors/barristers. Hence, the work experience/extracurricular opportunities are provided to cater to the interests of the majority. If you're looking for alternative routes, sign up for societies that organise such events. I was an active member in the Emerging Markets society at the LSE and that got me introduced to a lot of banks/finance practices. I eventually decided I wanted nothing to do with finance, but that was a decision I came to after exploring the profession.

    What do you want to do though? I think that's the biggest problem in that you're not sure what you want to do after your degree.
    I was consoling myself with the GDL route in case I changed my mind after 3 years. I'm just saying, the option there is open for me in case I ever want to become a lawyer, which isn't the case the other way around. That's all.

    Thanks for your advice; I think I'll just speak to both departments here.
    As for what I want to do after my degree - I'm not sure. Most people I've spoken to are in the same boat. I'll figure something out.
    Thanks again.
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    (Original post by Pariah)
    You would be much better doing a degree you like, getting a good result and then doing the GDL if you still want to be a solicitor. Firms don't really care about law vs non law degrees. As an aside, I used to supervise trainees when I was a lawyer and most of the really good ones (of about 18) had non law degrees.
    Thank you! I'll definitely consider that!
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    Hi there,

    I have an undergraduate degree in Law ( foreign degree) with 2.1 , is it sufficient to be admitted in a GDL programme????
 
 
 
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