name 10 books to make u intellectually well rounded e.g fiction history science stuff Watch

wag12k12dunkno
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name 10 books to basically make u most clever but well rounded so different genres
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Tufto
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That's not exactly how it works, I'm afraid .
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ChaosisaLadder
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I can name ten books everyone should read to be well rounded. Probably won't make you clever though but might broaden your thinking.

Plato - The Republic
Sun Tzu - The Art of War
Einstein - Relativity
Newton - Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathmatica
Darwin - Origin of Species
Machiavelli - The Prince
Orwell - 1984
Lao Tsu - Tao Te Ching
Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams
Golding - Lord of the Flies
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the bear
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Gödel, Escher, Bach

Cloud Atlas

that should get you started
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GR3YFOXXX
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Hawking - A brief history of time
Dostoyevski - Crime and Punishment
Machiavelli - The Prince
Marx - Das Capital
Pilger - The new rulers of the world
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1education
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Here's some suggestions http://www.amazon.com/Books-need-rea.../RRAVQ7P97UY9N


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Plainview
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Levi – If This Is A Man
Nietzsche – The Gay Science
Clavell – Shogun
Dostoyevsky – The Brothers Karamazov
Blake – Songs of Innocence and of Experience
Kafka – The Trial
Bryson – Notes From A Small Island
Spinoza – Ethics
Beowulf
Rushdie – Midnight's Children

All very important to me. No order.
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Plainview
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(Original post by ChaosisaLadder)
I can name ten books everyone should read to be well rounded. Probably won't make you clever though but might broaden your thinking.

Plato - The Republic
Sun Tzu - The Art of War
Einstein - Relativity
Newton - Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathmatica
Darwin - Origin of Species
Machiavelli - The Prince
Orwell - 1984
Lao Tsu - Tao Te Ching
Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams
Golding - Lord of the Flies
Yeah, they will.
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Solemn Rain
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(Original post by ChaosisaLadder)
I can name ten books everyone should read to be well rounded. Probably won't make you clever though but might broaden your thinking.

Plato - The Republic
Sun Tzu - The Art of War
Einstein - Relativity
Newton - Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathmatica
Darwin - Origin of Species
Machiavelli - The Prince
Orwell - 1984
Lao Tsu - Tao Te Ching
Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams
Golding - Lord of the Flies
*Grabs Kindle*
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Solemn Rain
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(Original post by Plainview)
Levi – If This Is A Man
Nietzsche – The Gay Science
Clavell – Shogun
Dostoyevsky – The Brothers Karamazov
Blake – Songs of Innocence and of Experience
Kafka – The Trial
Bryson – Notes From A Small Island
Spinoza – Ethics
Beowulf
Rushdie – Midnight's Children

All very important to me. No order.
*grabs the kindle for the 2nd time*
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edwinemanuelposse
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I love al kinda scifi, but to name one book : Stephen King : The Talisman !

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tal...traub_novel%29
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Princess-Zahra
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The best book to read (before you take on any book) is this one.

Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren: How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading


The first part of the book deals with the philosophy of reading and levels of reading. It argues that most people are only at the level of semi-literacy, and the second part of the book deals with tips and suggestions on how to read different books and analysis them. From Science to Literature everything is covered.
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pierreboobvier
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I've just about read of all of Shakespeare's work now. Absolutely incredible. He rules.
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member403966
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Anything written by John Pilger. Your life will change.
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jord089
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(Original post by Princess-Zahra)
The best book to read (before you take on any book) is this one.

Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren: How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading


The first part of the book deals with the philosophy of reading and levels of reading. It argues that most people are only at the level of semi-literacy, and the second part of the book deals with tips and suggestions on how to read different books and analysis them. From Science to Literature everything is covered.
Sounds like a good book this I will have to read it

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Lord Fifa
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Fracesca Simons- Horrid Henry Gets Rich Quick. Some of the concepts might be difficult to comprehend but overall I think the book deals with the fundamental economic issues that I feel need to be addressed. The book itself is a veritable encyclopaedia of free market economics, and I have learned more about capitalism from it than any other single economics book. It is, however very long and sometimes technical, so I recommend reading it selectively according to your interest.



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Kinkerz
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I'm going to deviate away from the pretentious, hardcore philosophy and history volumes that have been mentioned thus far. These are books that everyone wants to have read, but nobody other than the masochistic amongst us actually wants to read. The following are books that you might find fun:

Fiction
If you want to read a master of the English language: P.G. Wodehouse. By reading his work you'll see entirely new and [for all practical purposes] unique ways of manipulating words. Also, with P.G.W., you'll laugh a lot and generally find your morale soaring. The guy was an absolute genius.

Non-fiction
For a touch of help thinking in a straight line when society, with advertisements and slanted media output, continuously attempts to subvert you, Bad Science by Ben Goldacre is a really great read.

If you want to get better versed with the history of science, A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson will give you a rich and wonderfully entertaining summary. This is a really brilliant book. I actually can't recommend it strongly enough and wish it was mandatory reading at secondary school.

Physics has changed quite a lot over the last century and having some awareness of the discoveries during this time and what the future looks like is interesting to read about. Brian Greene writes really well on this topic and his book The Elegant Universe is good. You could also go for A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, but I think the former takes you through the timeline better.

It can get quite difficult to persevere with at times (the author seems to enjoy long-winded explanations), but reading Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman really affected me! The end result of this book is that you actually change the way you think about thinking, which makes more of a difference to your life than you might expect.

Bounce by Matthew Syed altered my way of thinking about accomplishments. The book is focused on natural talent vs. practice and he provides a series of arguments and experiments that demonstrate just how insignificant natural ability is in the face of extensive practice.

EDIT:
(Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
Hawking - A brief history of time
Dostoyevski - Crime and Punishment
Machiavelli - The Prince
Marx - Das Capital
Pilger - The new rulers of the world
Come on. Unless studying it as part of your university course, who in their right mind is going to attempt to unpick the meandering complexity of that?
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GR3YFOXXX
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(Original post by Kinkerz)
I'm going to deviate away from the pretentious, hardcore philosophy and history volumes that have been mentioned thus far. These are books that everyone wants to have read, but nobody other than the masochistic amongst us actually wants to read. The following are books that you might find fun:

Fiction
If you want to read a master of the English language: P.G. Wodehouse. By reading his work you'll see entirely new and [for all practical purposes] unique ways of manipulating words. Also, with P.G.W., you'll laugh a lot and generally find your morale soaring. The guy was an absolute genius.

Non-fiction
For a touch of help thinking in a straight line when society, with advertisements and slanted media output, continuously attempts to subvert you, Bad Science by Ben Goldacre is a really great read.

If you want to get better versed with the history of science, A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson will give you a rich and wonderfully entertaining summary. This is a really brilliant book. I actually can't recommend it strongly enough and wish it was mandatory reading at secondary school.

Physics has changed quite a lot over the last century and having some awareness of the discoveries during this time and what the future looks like is interesting to read about. Brian Greene writes really well on this topic and his book The Elegant Universe is good. You could also go for A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, but I think the former takes you through the timeline better.

It can get quite difficult to persevere with at times (the author seems to enjoy long-winded explanations), but reading Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman really affected me! The end result of this book is that you actually change the way you think about thinking, which makes more of a difference to your life than you might expect.

Bounce by Matthew Syed altered my way of thinking about accomplishments. The book is focused on natural talent vs. practice and he provides a series of arguments and experiments that demonstrate just how insignificant natural ability is in the face of extensive practice.

EDIT:

Come on. Unless studying it as part of your university course, who in their right mind is going to attempt to unpick the meandering complexity of that?
I fully concede that it is a difficult read. But regardless of your academic discipline it provides an extremely interesting view of classical economic theory. It is definitely a rewarding read.
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Clip
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Try some science fiction.

William Gibson invented the term Cyberspace, also kind of foresaw the internet. Start with Neuromancer, as everyone does.

Robert Heinlen is a bit mad, but if you want to do some deep thinking about the nature of citizenship and you don't particularly want to read Pericles's Funeral Oration from Thucydides, then you could do so much worse than Starship Troopers. Another book that has a great deal futurism in it, the American military were obsessed with it in the 60s and 70s.

In a similar vein, you can also try Ender's Game which makes Hunger Games look like Peppa Pig. You have to look past Orson Scott Card's politics on sexuality, though.
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Megsandmogs
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Wouldn't any book broden your mind and creativity. It doesn't matter what you read, as long as you enjoy the book it hardly matters what others think.
If you feel like that about any book, then your mind has been opened intellectually, is some aspects.
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