how does reading benefit u especially fiction Watch

wag12k12dunkno
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
ill give whoever gives the best answer a rep
0
reply
placenta medicae talpae
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
I do think it's slightly bizarre how parents and teachers moan about how much time people spend watching TV, movies and playing video games. But strongly encourage them to read books containing pretty much the same content.

If you're learning to read, then that's fine. Otherwise, probably not.
1
reply
BWV1007
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
Who cares? People read because they enjoy it.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
stargirl63
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
I would say it's to expand your vocabulary range, however, most of these books don't really have too many new words you don't know, unless you're reading a classic.

I think it's more of a brain exercise, you use a different part of your brain, as opposed to idol tv watching. Also I want to say something about it improving your level of creativity and being able to relate to the story a lot more than watching it on tv as a number of people who see a film say "the book is better than the film".
0
reply
Wr0nsk1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
Reading fiction actually benefits you quite a bit from my perspective. It engages your imagination and makes you think about life issues and what we all have in common. For example, Huckleberry Finn delivered a very strong anti-slavery and anti-racism message in a time when racism was rampant in the US (especially the South). Other fiction novels investigate various aspects of life such as life's meaning and morality issues.
0
reply
Pallas Athena
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
1. Helps improve one's English.
2. Entertainment.
0
reply
miser
  • Debate & Current Affairs Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
Here are some benefits that I find personally compelling:
  • Enjoyment
  • Exposure to novel thoughts and ideas
  • Empathetic engagement with characters
  • Education and learning new information
  • Prompting individual thought and reflection
  • Benefiting from the wisdom of others
  • Increased vocabulary for improved articulation
  • Improved spelling and grammar
  • Emotional gratification
3
reply
Welsh_insomniac
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by miser)
Here are some benefits that I find personally compelling:
  • Enjoyment
  • Exposure to novel thoughts and ideas
  • Empathetic engagement with characters
  • Education and learning new information
  • Prompting individual thought and reflection
  • Benefiting from the wisdom of others
  • Increased vocabulary for improved articulation
  • Improved spelling and grammar
  • Emotional gratification
I couldn't agree more with this post. A lot of people just say I'm being antisocial when I'm reading though
0
reply
Lotus_Eater
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
It teaches the reader that one gets taken more seriously when one writes questions that replace 'u' with 'you'.
0
reply
Kvothe the Arcane
  • Study Forum Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Welsh_insomniac)
I couldn't agree more with this post. A lot of people just say I'm being antisocial when I'm reading though
Well I suppose you are. But what's wrong with that?

You can be social at other occasions.
0
reply
DeceitfulDove
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
Reading for me is like being alone, but having the best company. Sometimes it's an escape, I can be a part of all these tales whilst sat in bed or on the sofa. It gives you more freedom and creativity than TV. In TV, everything is portrayed the way a small group of strangers want you to perceive it, from the character's voice to their appearance, emotions and clothing, and the landscape and surroundings. In a book, it is your own mind's eye doing this work, guided by the author. You don't get the satisfaction of being inside the character's head the way you can in books.

I've just finished a trilogy in which society is hugely controlled and there are only 100 stories, songs, poems, and paintings available to the citizens, chosen by the government. The rest were destroyed. Pages of novels from our time and pieces of poetry are rare and extremely valuable. They are traded for life saving medicine etc. The thought of losing all this amazing work we have around us, all the history, ideas and knowledge in our books made me realise just how much of a bookworm I am. If an apple a day is good for the body, a chapter a day is good for the mind.
3
reply
placenta medicae talpae
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by stargirl63)
I would say it's to expand your vocabulary range
idol tv watching
Yeah, so maybe you should give that reading thing a go some time.
0
reply
aranexus
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
I think people only have so much "reading energy" per day, and instead of learning something from a non fiction book or the net, they waste it on fiction. Even though the fiction from TV shows and films is way more engaging and utilizes more senses! In short I think reading fiction is a deprecated form of entertainment...
0
reply
desdemonata
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
There's so much more in book than a film, and anything is possible because you aren't hindered by a budget or the capabilities of CGI or anything else. I agree with the above poster that you get to construct the book how you want and you imagine the characters and settings in an individual way. A book can also change the way you see things, make you reflect on stuff that never crossed your mind before, opens your eyes a little wider. For those of us who grew up reading (think Harry potter) books are an important part of our childhood as we feel we "grew up" with that world and all those characters, that they played a part in who we are now.

I often don't want to finish a good book. You can create any world you want in a book, have whatever you want happen, more so than in a film, and you can explore it more in-depth as a book isn't written with a page limit in mind, the way films have to be squished down into a couple of hours and a bit. You can spend days in a book and not get bored.

Honestly, those who don't like reading or think that cringey, repetitive films and tv shows are better, I feel sorry for you. You're missing out on a lot.

And not to mention if you read a lot you learn a lot of vocabulary, internalise grammar and spelling, etc.
1
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
I personally find that the purpose of reading fiction is the same as that of watching a film - it allows you to escape into an alternative reality, hear an interesting story, experience allegories that parallel real life, or simply be entertained with a bit of action/humour etc.

However, I think reading a well-written book is a more immersive than watching a film. A film always finishes after a couple of hours, you only ever see what's on camera at the time, and it is limited by the quality of the actors, set, props, and effects that can be obtained on a particular budget. The author of a book has a lot more freedom and flexibility in what they can actually do. A book has greater scope to get you to really know and understand a character by going into the depths of what they are thinking or how they are feeling, to specifically direct your focus towards small but key details of the scene, and to analyse the background, reasons, and meanings behind the events that are taking place. Most importantly, it is the reader's own imagination which generates the scene, as opposed to it just being put in front of them, which makes everything a lot more personal.

It is for this reason that films which are based on books often seem a bit rushed with omission of a lot of important content. The film can be difficult to follow for someone who hasn't read the book, and very underwhelming for someone who has.
0
reply
Who shot John?
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by wag12k12dunkno)
ill give whoever gives the best answer a rep
They don't write books in road man unfortunately.
0
reply
stargirl63
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
(Original post by placenta medicae talpae)
Yeah, so maybe you should give that reading thing a go some time.
What was wrong with what I said?
0
reply
BWV1007
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
(Original post by stargirl63)
What was wrong with what I said?
"idol" -> "idle"
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA A-level Business Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (105)
19.13%
The paper was reasonable (276)
50.27%
Not feeling great about that exam... (109)
19.85%
It was TERRIBLE (59)
10.75%

Watched Threads

View All