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    SO I'm a first year and have found it quite difficult to build a group of medic friends. Everyone seems to have formed their groups by now so can't see myself living with any one on my course really. I've been invited to live with girls from my halls next year, none of whom do medicine.
    Will next year just be too difficult living with non-medics?
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    Living with other medics is good and bad.

    Good in the sense that you're 'all in it together' and you all know what you're going through. You can share clinical experiences, revise/practice together and generally talk about hospital life.

    But at the same time - you're all stressed at the same points in the year. You can all end up panicing about who is revising more. It's more easy to get trapped in the medic bubble. You have to constantly listen about work when actually you wouldn't mind switching off.

    So living with other medics isn't a be-all-end-all thing.
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    (Original post by shiggydiggy)
    Living with other medics is good and bad.

    Good in the sense that you're 'all in it together' and you all know what you're going through. You can share clinical experiences, revise/practice together and generally talk about hospital life.

    But at the same time - you're all stressed at the same points in the year. You can all end up panicing about who is revising more. It's more easy to get trapped in the medic bubble. You have to constantly listen about work when actually you wouldn't mind switching off.

    So living with other medics isn't a be-all-end-all thing.
    So what happens when you live with non-medics and they finish their degrees?
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    (Original post by Aihem)
    So what happens when you live with non-medics and they finish their degrees?
    You find new housemates?

    Even in medic circles, houses tend to rejig fairly frequently each year. This is especially true during the first half of the course.
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    My situation was slightly different because we lived in halls for the first three years, but I shared with non-medics for 2nd and 3rd year and there were no problems. Why would there be?

    When everyone else leaves you'll need to find somewhere else to live but that's not likely to be too difficult.
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    I think it will be very healthy to live with non-medics, to keep your mind broad and to stop you becoming too narrow-minded and medicine-centric....


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    (Original post by Aihem)
    So what happens when you live with non-medics and they finish their degrees?
    By that point you'll be on placement and living with medics will be a lot more practical.
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    (Original post by gemduck)
    SO I'm a first year and have found it quite difficult to build a group of medic friends. Everyone seems to have formed their groups by now so can't see myself living with any one on my course really. I've been invited to live with girls from my halls next year, none of whom do medicine.
    Will next year just be too difficult living with non-medics?
    I lived with 1 medic (who quit) in first year, and 2 other medics in my 2nd year. I used to think I was at a disadvantage because they all used to help each other with exam revision and get ideas etc, but what I forgot was that medics are INCREDIBLY competitive so living together could be just as "bad" as not living with any, in that the amount of work you have to do by yourself.

    I was lucky I had loads of good medic friends, they were just never people I felt I needed to live with. We'd revise together and practise for exams, but then we'd do our own thing so we weren't always in each others' faces.
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    (Original post by gemduck)
    SO I'm a first year and have found it quite difficult to build a group of medic friends. Everyone seems to have formed their groups by now so can't see myself living with any one on my course really. I've been invited to live with girls from my halls next year, none of whom do medicine.
    Will next year just be too difficult living with non-medics?
    I lived with non-medics for the 1st 3 years (no choice this year as moved city) and loved it - it was great coming back and chatting about totally random crap with no mention of medicine at all. Even around exam time (our exams are at diffent times) it was great as they weren't as stressed as me so went out their way to make sure I was okay. It sometimes seems whereever there are medics there is medic chat and it can be hard enough to get away from it without living with other medics :P
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    I lived with non medics all the way through med school. They moved on to do masters or to work but we still shared the house. The exact composition of the household changed over the years with some people moving out, boyfriends moving in etc. I think it made things much more interesting to have a mix of very different people.
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    You'll be sharing the rest of your life with medics. Getting some variety whilst you still can is a good thing.
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    Only downside I see is commuting alone to uni and back atm (but hey, podcasts were invented for a reason... ). And the occasional annoyance that they have effing free days and not a single 9 o'clock start this term due to their ingenious timetabling :rant:

    Living with a neuroscience and a war studies student makes for some fun times
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    You'll be sharing the rest of your life with medics. Getting some variety whilst you still can is a good thing.
    This. Much easier to fall into the medic bubble than it is to get out of it.
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    For me, the good thing about living with medics was being able to revise together as exams approached, especially if other people are better than you at certain things. Also you have lots of mutual friends, go to lots of the same things together, can share your stories of things etc.
    The negatives are constantly being around the same people, ending up being friends with medics only, becoming a totally medicine-centred person and yeah the whole competitive thing.

    Retrospectively I wish I'd lived with non-medics in first year as I had some great friends but by then had already fallen into a medical set so I ended up living with other medics. It was good, for sure, and as I said there were a lot of pros but I actually feel like it makes your life a little bit smaller, if that makes any sense. You get into medical life rather than University life. Unfortunately a lot of those friends finished their degrees and left.

    Living with non-medics (...at this point I would facetiously like to suggest you make friends with other people who have long courses as they'll still be around... obviously you can't design who is your friend this way xP) you do so much more stuff than ever before. Or at least I do. It means you have medic friends and also non-medic friends so everything is more balanced. In terms of revising with people, there are still plenty of other medics to revise with so it's no big deal at all. Especially if you know people who commute from home so don't have a natural group to revise with either.

    So personally I wouldn't worry about it. At the end of the day, you'll be happiest living with people you get on with regardless, and you're not going to be the only person looking for other people to live with come that 3 year finish point when everybody else finishes and you stick around.
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    I've spent one year living with non-medics and another year with medics from my year group. And if I had to choose again, I would certainly prefer to live with non-medics.

    It's so nice to come home after spending all day on the wards/uni and talk about everything else except medicine. Sure you may have medic-friends where you're good at avoiding lots of med talk. But when it comes to certain points throughout the year such as exams and project deadlines, then it's inevitable.


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    I've always shared a flat with my siblings (who are older than me and are doctors) so in essence, it was like living with medics who also played parent once in a while. :p:

    For me, the good thing about that was that they would often tell me to chill about things others may have been stressed about (retrospect is always 20/20 vision and all that). It was always nice to have someone around who could answer your questions (both medicine and non medicine related) and who would often explain things in terms of the big picture (i.e. this minute exam you have really isn't that big a deal. Relax.). I often got a break from medicine because they are older (and I think with age comes a realisation that medicine is just your job and not your life), and all their partners are non-medics, so whenever they were around (which seems like ALL the frikkin time :p:), it felt like a breath of fresh air (if I didn't have an exam or something approaching). We would hang out and talk about things totally unrelated to medicine.

    I couldn't imagine living with medics from my year 24/7, all year round, for 4/5 years (but that's just me). Even an outfirm, when you live with the same people you are on a firm with, can get a bit claustrophobic. You just need a bit of a break. And that break could either be:
    1. Living with older or younger medics (people who aren't in your year are less likely to be uber competitive with you but you still get the advice/help/resources etc.),
    2. Living with medics from a different uni (unrealistic because of geographical issues, but they will have a similar work ethic too and wouldn't give two craps about how you are doing on your course unles they were really, really sad, which is also entirely plausible)
    3. Living with dentists (their course is SO different to ours, yet they have a similar work ethic), or,
    4. Just living with non medics (probably the best option IMO).

    Like has been said on here, medicine is a HUGE bubble of super keen, competitive, individuals - give yourself a break whilst you can and enjoy it. Having said all this, of course you can find a lovely bunch of medic friends in your year and you could all live happily ever after...well,kinda...
 
 
 
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