My a-level teacher said for many people it is not possible to get higher than a C Watch

CantonHero
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So a while back one of my A-level science teachers informed the class that many people (even those who put in maximum possible effort) won't be able to get high grades such as an A, because it isn't based on revision but intelligence. I would just like to know you people's opinions on this, because when we were told this I was completely surprised and I didn't think this is the case at all.
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Kvothe the Arcane
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(Original post by CantonHero)
So a while back one of my A-level science teachers informed the class that many people (even those who put in maximum possible effort) won't be able to get high grades such as an A, because it isn't based on revision but intelligence. I would just like to know you people's opinions on this, because when we were told this I was completely surprised and I didn't think this is the case at all.
That is true. If that weren't the case, that'd mean that everyone could get an A with hardwork and the only the lazy get lower grades. That simply isn't true.
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Dr. Django
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She talks truth, but shouldnt really be talking like that to students :/ pretty demotivating
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Sayonara
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It's not based solely on intelligence. Revision technique and hardwork is the main factor contributing to higher grades.

Look at me. At the start of my sixth form career, ALIS predicted me getting C/Ds. Guess what I got? 94% average UMS across 5 AS subjects and the highest UCAS points in my year group (on par with a few people in my year group).

It's called pushing yourself to your full potential. I lacked motivation and common sense during my GCSE career. The grade boundaries are so low due to the fact that there are lazy people or people who do not know how to revise properly (they may work hard, but they do not revise efficiently).

Ignore what your teacher says. I do not like it when people say that you cannot achieve. You can.

Some people revise 5 hours a day and fail because they do not revise efficiently. YOLO, so work hard and live better for the rest of your life.
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Big-Daddy
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No it's not true. It's all about how you think and understand, or, on a lesser level, how you revise, for the exams. Simply blindly putting in effort may not be enough to get more than C for some people. But the difference between those who can slave away for months to get C grades and those who get 98 UMS with revision limited to past papers is that the latter have a better grasp over how to think about and understand their subject and/or exams.
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Endless Blue
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I agree with the above post. Intelligence does indeed play a reasonable part, but work ethic and effectiveness is far more important than inherent intelligence at A level.
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Table dust
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if being intelligent means you memorize and comprehend the entire text book in addition to practicing past papers - yes
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Katie97
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Revising and learning = intelligence in the subject.

I don't understand how someone can place intelligence on another level, like some people are born 'naturally clever' no they aren't. People become clever. They aren't 'born'. Hard work = results.
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IllmaticDragon
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For sciences and maths I would say if someone is not smart or good at the subject they probably wont get good grades.
While for humanities and social sciences, maybe an idiot could work hard and get good grades, not so much for the hard subjects.
I only do humanities and social sciences so hahaha


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GeogBerry
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(Original post by CantonHero)
So a while back one of my A-level science teachers informed the class that many people (even those who put in maximum possible effort) won't be able to get high grades such as an A, because it isn't based on revision but intelligence. I would just like to know you people's opinions on this, because when we were told this I was completely surprised and I didn't think this is the case at all.
I believe if you aren't suited to a subject this is very true. I know someone who does minimal revision for biology but still got an A, focused their efforts all year on chemistry and got a C (and visa versa.)

It isn't completely true though as biology is just a lot of content with an odd exam style and physics is mostly maths, chemistry on the other hand, is really based on how you understand the subject.
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nic-nac
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It's based on how well you can repeat the information in the specification. Plus there is only a limited number of people that can get top grades. Even if everyone got at least 80/100 marks, people would still get Us and Es, it's just that the grade boundaries would be tiny.
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Smile_124
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Hard work beats talent when talent becomes lazy.
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Annabel4
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I did AS Biology and Chemistry and I'm currently doing A2 chemistry.

In my opinion biology is mainly knowing facts and you can get by pretty well by just remembering the mark scheme as many questions have similar formats.

Chemistry on the other hand, at least at A2, is more about knowing the subject well and being able to apply the knowledge in different situations.

From talking to people who do Physics it does seem that it is mainly applied maths.

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Exon
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I would replace the word 'possible' with 'realistic'. An A at A-level is not impossible to anyone that really wants it.
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FlavaFavourFruit
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Nah that's silly.
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wartortle
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So not true.
I wanted 3 As and put the work in, working effectively everyday.
Im not smart, because I failed the first year, got CUU,

If you out the work in, anything is possible.
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alow
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(Original post by Exon)
I would replace the word 'possible' with 'realistic'. An A at A-level is not impossible to anyone that really wants it.
I'd agree with this. I knew a few people in my chemistry class who were not particularly talented at the subject but they put a ton of work into it and got As.

I on the other hand did much less work as I found it easy compared to some of my other subjects, and got an A*. It just comes down to a mixture of effort and ability, although some of the questions where you need to apply your knowledge can be beyond some people but that is the point of them, to differentiate between A and A* candidates.
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