holasenorita1
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i still don't get iv for some reason I just don't know how people can figure out the iv so quick and I cant I seem to I struggle for example if they give a question whats the iv and dv I cant seem to figure it out like how do you find out the iv smeon eplease help can you give examples so explain it to a dumb person like me can understand please thanku and bwt I read someones who is stuck to but I still don't get it Thanku
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seantnash
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The independent variable is what you are looking at to see if it causes an effect on something.

So, for example, let's say you were testing alcohol effect on memory your IV would be alcohol so you may give some participants no alcohol, some a pint of vodka and others a pint of beer.

If you were testing whether light levels affected concentration you might put some participants in a room with no light, some in a room with candle light and some in a room with a standard light bulb.

Hope that makes sense and helps clarify it a bit?


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Student_27
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The independent variable is the variable that you change in an experiment, whilst the dependent variable is the one you measure.




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cuppaJo
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IV = Input. Your DV is what you collect from the expt.


Say you're testing the effect of sunlight on a person's tiredness. The IV is the sunlight, because it's what you're changing, what you're putting into the experiment, and the DV is the tiredness, because it's what you're recording.

Sorry if that was badly explained ;^^ If it doubt, the IV is usually the first part of the hypothesis.
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holasenorita1
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(Original post by seantnash)
the independent variable is what you are looking at to see if it causes an effect on something.

So, for example, let's say you were testing alcohol effect on memory your iv would be alcohol so you may give some participants no alcohol, some a pint of vodka and others a pint of beer.

If you were testing whether light levels affected concentration you might put some participants in a room with no light, some in a room with candle light and some in a room with a standard light bulb.

Hope that makes sense and helps clarify it a bit?


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omg mong i get it dude u are freaking fantastic so wait the dv is then your measurin the effect on memeory ohhhh i get it i hope i do dude u should become a psycologist i would defoooo recommend u soo can you please give me moreeeeeeeeeeeee questiones saying whats the iv and dv please please pleaseeeeee thankuuuuuuuuuuu:d:d:d:d
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Vousden
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Wow.

(Original post by holasenorita1)
omg mong i get it dude u are freaking fantastic so wait the dv is then your measurin the effect on memeory ohhhh i get it i hope i do dude u should become a psycologist i would defoooo recommend u soo can you please give me moreeeeeeeeeeeee questiones saying whats the iv and dv please please pleaseeeeee thankuuuuuuuuuuu:d:d:d:d
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seantnash
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Lol well funnily enough I am studying psychology degree yep your DV in that example would be memory score.

Okay here are five hypothesis - see if you can get the IV and DV in each:

1) There will be significantly more viewers of the last episode in a series of Strictly Come Dancing than the first episode.

2) There will be a significant difference in salary between McDonald's workers and Burger King workers.

3) Ferraris will cost significantly more than Skodas.

4) There will be a significant relationship between age and IQ.

5) Footballers are significantly more likely to retire early than teachers.

Good luck!




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holasenorita1
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(Original post by seantnash)
Lol well funnily enough I am studying psychology degree yep your DV in that example would be memory score.

Okay here are five hypothesis - see if you can get the IV and DV in each:

1) There will be significantly more viewers of the last episode in a series of Strictly Come Dancing than the first episode.

2) There will be a significant difference in salary between McDonald's workers and Burger King workers.

3) Ferraris will cost significantly more than Skodas.

4) There will be a significant relationship between age and IQ.

5) Footballers are significantly more likely to retire early than teachers.

Good luck!




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Okay lets try some tricky ones : 1) IV : YOU WILL BE CHANGING THE AMOUNT OF VIEWERS IN THE LAST EPISODE THEN THE THE FIST the DV: would be measuring the amount of viewers 2) iv : what changes so the salary changes between macdonalds and burger kings, DV: DO YOU MEASURE THE DIFFERNCE BETWEEN THEM 3) IV: IS THE COST AND DV: IS THE COST I THINK NOT SURE 4) DONT THINK THERES AN iv BUT THE DV IS YOU WILL MEASURE THE RELATIONSHIP THATS HARD 5) IV THE FOOTBALLERS WILL CHANGE AND THE DV IS Footballers are significantly more likely to retire early than teachers.
I DOUBT IS right BUT tell if its wrong thanku
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zabveniye
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Heh...it really is pretty simple once you get the hang of it.

Try looking at it this way: in any experiment in which the investigator changes a condition to see what effect it has on another, there are both an independent and dependent variable; neither can be missing, and they can't be the same - that really just wouldn't make sense. It would be like somebody putting a certain number of apples in a box to see what the effect would be on the number of apples in the box. You know how many apples you put in the box, so what exactly are you investigating? However, if you add in another variable, it becomes an actual investigation. Let's say you want to see what effect the number of apples in a box has on the number of apples people presented with the box eat.

The independent variable is the one you can change (or that changes by itself, and you observe the effect of.) The dependent variable is the one you don't have control over - the thing you're investigating. In the above example, the variable that you control is the number of apples in the box. The variable that you don't control is the number of apples people eat. There is, or may be, a link between these variables - so that one has an effect on the other - or, in other words, it depends on the other variables.

If the answers you gave above were correct, this is what the five hypotheses would be:

1) Changing the amount of viewers in the last episode, then the first, will affect measuring the amount of viewers - wait, what? How do you plan to control the exact number of viewers watching these things? And what exactly do you want to find out - how much more difficult it is so measure one number of viewers that you've already decided on than another number of viewers? I'm as confused as you probably are.

Look at the example seantnash gave again:

"There will be significantly more viewers of the last episode in a series of Strictly Come Dancing than the first episode. "

Ask yourself these questions:
In this sentence, there are two different relevant variables- things that, in different conditions, will change. In any condition, the show will be Strictly Come Dancing. In any condition, you'll be measuring the number of viewers. Those things won't change throughout the course of the investigation, so they don't matter. But which two things will change?

Answer:
-the number of viewers
-the episode they're watching

Will the number of viewers affect which episode is shown? Unless the television companies are reading the viewers' minds, have pre-recorded the show and will decide to show the episodes at random if the viewers reach a certain number, then, uh, no. But will the episode being shown affect how many people decide to watch it? Much more likely.

The episode being shown may have an effect on the number of viewers watching it. The hypothesis states that the number of viewers will depend on which episode it is. So the number of viewers is the dependent variable. That only leaves the episode being shown, which is the independent variable: the variable that affects the independent one.

Maybe you could try the rest again. This is what they'd be if your answers were correct:

2) What changes so that salary changes between MacDonalds and Burger King will have an effect on whether or not you measure the difference between them

3) The cost of cars will depend on the cost of those same cars

4) Nothing will have an effect on measuring the relationship that's hard

5) Footballers changing will have an effect on whether footballers are more likely to retire early than teachers

It doesn't make sense. Try looking at it from another angle and try again.
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holasenorita1
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I like the others guy one sorry but the first paragraphed made me want to sleep it was too long and I know it took long for u and time to do this and thanku to try and help me but it wont work
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