'Favourite' Nazi topic? Watch

aebckr
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Hi everyone!

For an assignment I need to write 5000 words on something to do with the Rise of the Nazis, 1919-1933, of which I need to create a question.

I'm having a bit of a creative blank - I think I'd like to look at something to do with Hitler as a person, or failures that were turned around, Munich Putsch, Failure of the Liberty Laws etc. but not sure I could fill 5,000 words.

So my question is, what do you find most interesting about the Rise of the Nazis and why? I don't want you to write my question but am looking for some inspiration - I know I'd regret if I chose a question such as 'Account for the Rise of the Nazis 1929-33'!

Thank you


NB- I really want to change the thread title but can't :')
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Deycallmeboo
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It's a bit of an unpredictable area but you could research like maybe people from other countries that joined the nazis? And then link this to why they would have joined, whether that be fear, propaganda, or perhaps the genuine support of the nazi regime? So ultimately how people were influenced during the nazi reign and how this contributed to the holocaust etc.

you could try and concolude what sector of German society was most indoctrinated by the nazis and hitler and why this may be (example women were given medals for having babies) or perhaps what sector was the main instigator of the holocaust

Maybe delve into the persecution of other minorities at the time, like the handicapped and perhaps look for some accounts or such

Perhaps look at whether or not the ss were actually as 'elite' as they are regarded now? Look at stories of heroics during the nazi regime, Irena Sendler is a woman I have researched and her story is amazing! This could be a tangent from a more in depth study of the ways nazis persecuted the Jews, the stages resulting in the final 'solution'

also it's not really relevant, but there's a forest (it may have been destroyed by now) that among the ever greens, larch trees were planted in bradenburg and so every autumn their leaves change colour, they were planted in the shape of a swastika and I have always wondered why the nazis would do this? What was the point?!

ok well I mean these aren't really great but I hope it may trigger something in your mind! These are just things I find interesting!
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by aebckr)
Hi everyone!

For an assignment I need to write 5000 words on something to do with the Rise of the Nazis, 1919-1933, of which I need to create a question.

I'm having a bit of a creative blank - I think I'd like to look at something to do with Hitler as a person, or failures that were turned around, Munich Putsch, Failure of the Liberty Laws etc. but not sure I could fill 5,000 words.

So my question is, what do you find most interesting about the Rise of the Nazis and why? I don't want you to write my question but am looking for some inspiration - I know I'd regret if I chose a question such as 'Account for the Rise of the Nazis 1929-33'!

Thank you


NB- I really want to change the thread title but can't :')
Try watching the TV series 'The Nazis. A warning from history.' Or the first episode of the World at War, A new Germany.

5000 words should be easy for this one. It's such a fascinating topic.
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boris the animal
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This topic is covered extensively on the Internet.

Everything is quite evident and lies on the surface. It's the end of World War I. Germany is ruined. The market is crashed. Money becomes worth nothing, and you can't buy anything with it. There's no work. It's a sad situation, isn't it?

And suddenly, a charismatic politician appears who promises to restore the former power of the country. And we all know how everything ended...
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aebckr
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(Original post by boris the animal)
This topic is covered extensively on the Internet.

Everything is quite evident and lies on the surface. It's the end of World War I. Germany is ruined. The market is crashed. Money becomes worth nothing, and you can't buy anything with it. There's no work. It's a sad situation, isn't it?

And suddenly, a charismatic politician appears who promises to restore the former power of the country. And we all know how everything ended...
Thank you for your help but I was just wondering which areas people found most interesting, because while I do know what happened I wanted to take a more interesting approach as I can't really make a timeline or narrative, I have to assess particular areas and ideally come up with a "to what extent" question. I know it is all over the internet but I was really looking for inspiration rather than knowledge, if you know what I mean? Thank you
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aebckr
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(Original post by Deycallmeboo)
It's a bit of an unpredictable area but you could research like maybe people from other countries that joined the nazis? And then link this to why they would have joined, whether that be fear, propaganda, or perhaps the genuine support of the nazi regime? So ultimately how people were influenced during the nazi reign and how this contributed to the holocaust etc.

you could try and concolude what sector of German society was most indoctrinated by the nazis and hitler and why this may be (example women were given medals for having babies) or perhaps what sector was the main instigator of the holocaust

Maybe delve into the persecution of other minorities at the time, like the handicapped and perhaps look for some accounts or such

Perhaps look at whether or not the ss were actually as 'elite' as they are regarded now? Look at stories of heroics during the nazi regime, Irena Sendler is a woman I have researched and her story is amazing! This could be a tangent from a more in depth study of the ways nazis persecuted the Jews, the stages resulting in the final 'solution'

also it's not really relevant, but there's a forest (it may have been destroyed by now) that among the ever greens, larch trees were planted in bradenburg and so every autumn their leaves change colour, they were planted in the shape of a swastika and I have always wondered why the nazis would do this? What was the point?!

ok well I mean these aren't really great but I hope it may trigger something in your mind! These are just things I find interesting!
Thanks for this! It was really helpful.
I think I'm either going to look at how different areas were targeted, particularly as the party evolved and expanded geographically and socially, or the extent to which it was a political religion

I'm definitely going to look at that forest and Sendler though, if only out of interest.
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pokemons
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Basically your question should be. To what extent were the ideals of The National Socialists inspired by the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche and did he predict the coming of them and they're atrocities in his books? Basically were Nietzsche's "Prophecies" correct
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danny111
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What's most interesting is how they were almost nothing, Hitler was even in prison after the Beer Hall Putsch, so how come he came to be chancellor? How did they come back from it? (Mostly propaganda, dissing Versailles, communists, jews and making use of the Nazi propaganda machine).
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Kallisto
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The Reichstags fire in 1933 was decisive for the dictatorship later on, as it caused the Enabling Act of 1933, so the parliament of the government - and the National Socialism - gets the complete authority in German Reich. To understand why Hitler and the national socialism came to power and why the National Socialism could influence the population so much at that time, it is important to understand why the Enabling Act of 1933 was enacted and signed by Hindenburg.
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Deycallmeboo
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(Original post by aebckr)
Thanks for this! It was really helpful.
I think I'm either going to look at how different areas were targeted, particularly as the party evolved and expanded geographically and socially, or the extent to which it was a political religion

I'm definitely going to look at that forest and Sendler though, if only out of interest.
Happy to help
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Academic Warrior
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Easiest question to do from my experience is 'how did the nazis use of propaganda help them into power?'


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Sir Fox
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(Original post by boris the animal)
This topic is covered extensively on the Internet.

Everything is quite evident and lies on the surface. It's the end of World War I. Germany is ruined. The market is crashed. Money becomes worth nothing, and you can't buy anything with it. There's no work. It's a sad situation, isn't it?

And suddenly, a charismatic politician appears who promises to restore the former power of the country. And we all know how everything ended...
Okay, your jumbling quite a bit here. WWI ended in 1918/19, the Great depression only started about ten years later, the hyperinflation lasted from 1921 to 1924, way too early to be directly related to the rise of national socialism.
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Sir Fox
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(Original post by aebckr)
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An interesting topic is Weimar party politics. There were quite a lot of parties represented in the Reichstag, and towards the end of the Weimar Republic the centre lost a lot of ground. I can't find any diagrams right now (my history book had some interesting images), but you can see the far right and far left parties slowly gaining votes and the centre losing votes over the years.
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boris the animal
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(Original post by Sir Fox)
Okay, your jumbling quite a bit here. WWI ended in 1918/19, the Great depression only started about ten years later, the hyperinflation lasted from 1921 to 1924, way too early to be directly related to the rise of national socialism.
The Nazis came to power in the early 30s. The country lay in ruins for several more years. Don't you see the cause and effect here?

Read "The Black Obelisk" by Erich Maria Remarque. The situation in the country as well as the public mood before the Nazis came to power is described quite well there.
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Sir Fox
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(Original post by boris the animal)
The Nazis came to power in the early 30s. The country lay in ruins for several more years. Don't you see the cause and effect here?
I'm German and we covered this extensively in school

Yeah, it the economy was one of the reasons, but it's far from 'quite evident and lies on the surface'. There was a myriad of other reasons, from the old, autocratically oriented elites of the empire that were still present in the judiciary, military and other branches of of the civil service to the radicalisation and drift towards the right and left extremes of all political parties.
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fs1
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i've been doing the Nazi Germany for about 5 or 6 months at school now, we've got a big exam paper on it.
points you might want to consider and explore:
- the use of propaganda and how it increased votes for the nazi party e.g. funding from industrialists who were afraid of the communists coming into power, who would strip them of their wealth. this is what enabled the Nazis to afford to use new technology such as radio, aeroplanes (flying Hitler to 5 cities in one day), rallies, training members in public speaking skills. the scapegoating of jews,
- targeting the November Criminals - Ebert and his government who signed the Treaty of Versailles) and the communists
- how successful the nazi party was in stabilizing the economy after coming into power in 1933 (here, you could talk of the Labour programmes they had introduced, and how they hid the huge cost of re-arming the country by organisations such as 'Strength through Joy')
- the night of long knives - the death of Ernst Rohm essentially weakened the SA, which lead to the strengthening of the SS, Hitler's direct private army and also the oath of loyalty taken by all the soldiers in the country's official army
- this is pre-nazi in power but you could explore Stresemann's successes abroad and at home which helped him to stabilize germany's economy and foreign relations around the early 1920s. (the dawes plan, the kellog-briand pact, the young plan... i'd research these all individually because some are to do with the economy and settling reparations and some are to do with borders and foreign relations)
- you could look at the Weimar Republic and it's weaknesses - proportional reprasentation in elections, which is why there were around 20 parties, threats such as the Kapp Putsch (which failed) and the Munich Putsch attempted by Hitler and the Nazis (which also failed)
- Hitler's agreement to stay out of the way of the church - the concordat
i hope this helped...
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fs1
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(Original post by Kallisto)
The Reichstags fire in 1933 was decisive for the dictatorship later on, as it caused the Enabling Act of 1933, so the parliament of the government - and the National Socialism - gets the complete authority in German Reich. To understand why Hitler and the national socialism came to power and why the National Socialism could influence the population so much at that time, it is important to understand why the Enabling Act of 1933 was enacted and signed by Hindenburg.
also, another reason why the enabling act was pushed in to force was because hitler used the weimar constution against hindenburg by exclaiming that the constitution did not protect the people of germany from acts of terrorism such as the reichstag fire which was apparently a 'conspircy' by the communists. futhermore, the members of reichstag were also intimidated into agreeing into passing the enabling act and effectively ending democracy by using the SA.
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Gjaykay
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Mines if how the Prince of Prussia (I refuse to call him King) Wilhelm II threw Bismark out, and then started single handedly WW1 and WW2.

History doesn't recognize the Kaiser as being the piece of **** that cause so much pain, death and emptiness of said world wars which were worse than Hitler's slaughters.

I feel this gets overlooked and anyone who does overlook it, knows **** all about history and should know that Adolf Hitler wasn't actually a bag guy.

Hitler made the best out of a bad situation - which ended when he killed himself - and rose Germany onto the world stage again.

It disgusts me that we demonize both Bismark and Hitler, When quite frankly all they are is Gordon Brown and Davie Cameron (to an extreme degree, dicks), but they had complete power.

I don't understand why history isn't crammed into the mind of every school child, Hitler wasn't a nice guy - but there was far worse - Stalin was a complete ****, but we hear about him in passing, and **** me but Chairman Mao?

He is the largest serial killer this planets' ever known. Yet we don't hear **** all about him. I was never told about Chairman Mao at all at school, I had to learn on TSR and my own research. Which, quite frankly is the saddest thing I've ever heard

How can any man or women not teach their kids about the biggest ******* this world's ever seen?
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tehFrance
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(Original post by Gjaykay)
Mines if how the Prince of Prussia (I refuse to call him King) Wilhelm II threw Bismark out, and then started single handedly WW1 and WW2.
You're a complete tit not only because you refuse to call the Kaiser King (he's King of Prussia but Emperor of Germany) but because you think he single-handedly started both world wars when in-fact WW1 was Germany going to the defence of Austria-Hungary (although at the end of the day, it was a family problem as all of them hated each other :lol:) and WW2 was caused by the market crashes and social disorder which led to Hitler's rise which in term led down the path of war which was always his aim with Lebensraum!

Why do not wish to call the Kaiser by his title? If you really are doing an essay on this for school/college/uni then you'll lose marks and judging by your piss poor attitude, you're most likely 12 and in school so in the long run it won't make a difference but your stance towards history is moronic especially as the Kaiser is held to account along with the rest of the royals involved in WW1 as it was a war of families more than anything.
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Gjaykay
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(Original post by tehFrance)
You're a complete tit not only because you refuse to call the Kaiser King (he's King of Prussia but Emperor of Germany) but because you think he single-handedly started both world wars when in-fact WW1 was Germany going to the defence of Austria-Hungary (although at the end of the day, it was a family problem as all of them hated each other :lol:) and WW2 was caused by the market crashes and social disorder which led to Hitler's rise which in term led down the path of war which was always his aim with Lebensraum!

Why do not wish to call the Kaiser by his title? If you really are doing an essay on this for school/college/uni then you'll lose marks and judging by your piss poor attitude, you're most likely 12 and in school so in the long run it won't make a difference but your stance towards history is moronic especially as the Kaiser is held to account along with the rest of the royals involved in WW1 as it was a war of families more than anything.
Yeah I'm 22, been to uni and studied this era of history extensively. Don't worry, I know I'm wrong, which is obviously why I posted it in the first place :rolleyes:.

Without getting into the intricacies of Europe prior to WW1, Bismark (or well Germany :rolleyes:) eventually held the made up title of undisputed King of Europe (as it was) but unofficially, and Bismark unified the whole of Europe through his web of lies, blackmail, power and bribery. That aint a debated point, he did. The King of Prussia (Wilhelm I) let his dumbass son take over (Wilhelm II), who promptly fired Bismark for being "an old man" led the path into WW1, which obviously led to WW2.

I don't call the Prince of Prussia by his title because due to the blood of both the first and second world war stained on his hands, he doesn't deserve it.
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