Can we talk about the 40% PGCE drop out rate? Anyone here dropped out? Watch

username1170246
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Mr M
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(Original post by FilmExpert)
So I read in another thread there was a 20% drop out rate for PGCE. I found it to be true (average of 15% drop out during the PGCE and further 5% during the first year).

I am concerned, as whilst I do want to teach, 1-in-5 dropout seems very high, considering that everyone who applies goes through this long application process that involves presentations, skills tests, work experience etc. etc. and doing PGCE is obviously costs money, time, and hard work.

I am just wondering what are the main reasons why people drop out?
It's rather higher than 20%.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/ed...s-1771871.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-20340362
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wildrover
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People need to get a grip of themselves, they know before they start its going to be the most stressful year of their life and enter unprepared.
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WanderingRanger
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Without meaning to sound harsh, given the job market is heavily over subscribed with there being lots more candidates than there are jobs I think it's a good thing that some drop out.
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myrtille
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(Original post by FilmExpert)
So I read in another thread there was a 20% drop out rate for PGCE. I found it to be true (average of 15% drop out during the PGCE and further 5% during the first year).

I am concerned, as whilst I do want to teach, 1-in-5 dropout seems very high, considering that everyone who applies goes through this long application process that involves presentations, skills tests, work experience etc. etc. and doing PGCE is obviously costs money, time, and hard work.

I am just wondering what are the main reasons why people drop out?
On my PGCE we had 2 drop out, out of 22, so under 10%, but I think my subject had one of the lowest drop-out rates out of all the Secondary PGCEs.

One dropped out at the start when they first got into school and just realised it wasn't for them. The other dropped out near the end - I don't know the details but I got the impression it was a case of jumping before they were pushed as they were going to fail anyway and there was no point struggling through to the end. They never seemed very committed, and ultimately you can't see the PGCE through without a lot of resilience and determination.

I would say the main reasons people quit are:
-realise it's not for them
-not committed to put in the amount of work that is needed
-failing - encouraged to leave due to lacking professionalism
-problems with school placement (difficult/bullying mentors)
-mental health (stress/anxiety/depression)
-other health/family reasons

Essentially the same reasons people would drop out of any degree course, but magnified by how challenging the PGCE is.
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Mr M
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(Original post by wildrover)
People need to get a grip of themselves, they know before they start its going to be the most stressful year of their life and enter unprepared.
I would argue that the NQT year and NQT+1 are more difficult. It does get noticeably easier after 3 or 4 years.
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Maid Marian
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(Original post by Mr M)
I would argue that the NQT year and NQT+1 are more difficult. It does get noticeably easier after 3 or 4 years.
Mr M, just wondering if you could answer, but do ALL secondary school teachers have to do a PGCE? :hmmmm2:
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Mr M
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(Original post by Maid Marian)
Mr M, just wondering if you could answer, but do ALL secondary school teachers have to do a PGCE? :hmmmm2:
No - there are other routes to Qualified Teacher Status and some "teachers" do not have any teaching qualifications at all.
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Mr M)
I would argue that the NQT year and NQT+1 are more difficult. It does get noticeably easier after 3 or 4 years.
I would completely agree with you. My NQT year was one of the worst of my life, and it was 30 years ago. I still remember it.
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Maid Marian
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(Original post by Mr M)
No - there are other routes to Qualified Teacher Status and some "teachers" do not have any teaching qualifications at all.
Oh okay Just wondered Thank you!
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Maid Marian
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(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
I would completely agree with you. My NQT year was one of the worst of my life, and it was 30 years ago. I still remember it.
Why does the training for teachers sound so horrible?
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Maid Marian)
Why does the training for teachers sound so horrible?
It's a combination of massive overwork, a lot of pointless paperwork, horrible kids and the shattering of idealistic dreams.
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Mr M
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(Original post by Maid Marian)
Why does the training for teachers sound so horrible?
It's not horrible but it is hard. One of my colleagues is in her NQT+1 year at the moment and is having a pretty difficult time - she is exhausted (this is typical at this time of the year) and a number of unwarranted parental complaints have made her question her work.
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Juichiro
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(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
I would completely agree with you. My NQT year was one of the worst of my life, and it was 30 years ago. I still remember it.
Why?
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Mr M
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(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
It's a combination of massive overwork, a lot of pointless paperwork, horrible kids and the shattering of idealistic dreams.
Aw don't tell them the truth or the drop-out rate will increase to 50%.
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Juichiro)
Why?
I was completely unprepared. I had had a very sheltered education myself (all girls, private school) and had no knowledge of how tough kids can be. I was exhausted all the time, felt I was I danger of being assaulted by some of the older kids and I was, not to put too fine a point on it, not nearly a good enough teacher to deal with the situation I found myself in. I was completely wet behind the ears and despite sterling support from the head of department and the second, I really suffered.
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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A lot of my friends started a PGCE because they didn't know what else to do, and "teach" seemed to be a good option.

But people who go in with that mindset aren't likely to succeed because you have to REALLY want to do it in order to be able to cope with the work.

Also, several of the people who I knew did it so that they could spend another year living as a student, not knowing that this course is very different to the average "hand a couple of assignments in and hope for the best" that they were used to.
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by Mr M)
Aw don't tell them the truth or the drop-out rate will increase to 50%.
Well, I feel a kind of responsibility to save the vulnerable.
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
A lot of my friends started a PGCE because they didn't know what else to do, and "teach" seemed to be a good option.

But people who go in with that mindset aren't likely to succeed because you have to REALLY want to do it in order to be able to cope with the work.

Also, several of the people who I knew did it so that they could spend another year living as a student, not knowing that this course is very different to the average "hand a couple of assignments in and hope for the best" that they were used to.
That was me. On the plus side, I did meet my husband.
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Maid Marian
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(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
It's a combination of massive overwork, a lot of pointless paperwork, horrible kids and the shattering of idealistic dreams.
(Original post by Mr M)
It's not horrible but it is hard. One of my colleagues is in her NQT+1 year at the moment and is having a pretty difficult time - she is exhausted (this is typical at this time of the year) and a number of unwarranted parental complaints have made her question her work.
:afraid:
Is it just this bad for secondary schools, or is primary school training just as bad?
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