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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    How many of your graduating class went off to become diplomats?
    I don't think any! I actually really wanted to do that, but I'm not a fan of the Bush administration, so I decided not to go into the foreign service right now. I think a lot of my classmates felt similarly. It's a future possibility though. I plan to take the foreign service exam in March.
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    wut did you actually study at Oxford? they dont have IR as far as I know
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    (Original post by pearfire)
    wut did you actually study at Oxford? they dont have IR as far as I know
    Stanford sets up classes with Oxford lecturers. Then you have one (or more) tutorial with an Oxford tutor.

    The first term I took Modern British Economy, a class on the NHS, and a tutorial in African politics.
    The second term I took the class on globalization that took us to Berlin, European Imperialism in the 3rd World, and a tutorial on Nigerian post-independence history.
    BTW I had a minor in African Studies, hence the Africa-slant of my studies. That's the biggest reason I went to Oxford, they have great resources on Africa at the Rhodes House.

    My tutor in the second term is really famous and wrote one of my recommendations for graduate school
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    Oh... I see... btw, why did you choose the UK for grad school, besides the tutorial system that you like. I mean, the US has actually the more prestigious grad schools...
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    (Original post by pearfire)
    Oh... I see... btw, why did you choose the UK for grad school, besides the tutorial system that you like. I mean, the US has actually the more prestigious grad schools...
    1. I love London
    2. 1 year master's degree = less time and less money
    3. many top US universities don't do masters degrees in the social sciences, just PhD where you get a master's along the way. I can't commit.
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    what kind of masters do you wanna get? not an mba right?
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    (Original post by bloop)
    Hey,
    I only discovered this forum this afternoon, and it seems like quite something, and I'd like to help out with questions people may have. First, a little background:

    I was born and raised in the US (in the fine state of Virginia). This also means, unfortunately, that I can't help with questions dealing with foreign exams, such as A-Levels. On the other hand, I'm fairly well versed with a lot of US universities and the application process.

    During the early admissions stage, I applied to Harvard SCEA, was accepted, and during the regular decision stage, applied to Yale, Princeton, Stanford, and MIT. I had the luxury of applying to only these schools since I knew I had at least one acceptance bagged. Unexpected, but certainly welcome . Given this, HYPSM are the schools I'm probably most well informed about (culture, strengths, weaknesses, admission information, etc).

    Of the schools I applied to regular decision, I got into Princeton, Stanford, and MIT. I was flat out rejected at Yale, but alas, so it goes . I was fortunate in that financial aid wasn't too huge an issue, so I could really investigate the other merits of a university. At the end, it was a tough decision that came down to Harvard and Princeton, but I chose Princeton (and haven't regretted it since!)

    As for my major: I shall be majoring in Operations Research and Financial Engineering (ORFE) @ Princeton. Think of it as a very mathematical approach to economics...though that's not it exactly. Postgraduation plans...hmm...I'm hoping to work on Wall Street (hehe...a common, bland sort of Princeton thing), something I never intended coming into college. I always figured I'd be a math or international relations major (talk about two totally different things...). If I get really luck, I'll get to work at a hedge fund or something. We'll see. I also will have certificate degrees (certificate degree is something like a minor) in Finance and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. So again, if that's what you're looking at, that's what I happen to be most knowledgeable about.

    I can answer most any type of question you want me to (admissions, financial aid, academics, culture, etc). The only exception, again, are things that require me to know a LOT about foreign exams (though I do have a few international friends here).

    By the way, if anybody else who's been through the application process wants to contribute, feel free to do so. Your expertise, I'm sure will clear a lot up for potential applicants.

    Good luck to all!

    EDIT: One more thing...I applied to Oxford as well...not sure if that matters.
    Are there many other colleges/universities in the US that offer this subject in a doctoral programme?

    It is an innovative subject and Financial Engineering is only available at one college in the UK.
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    (Original post by shady lane)
    Oxford also do a lot of reading but the learning is more rote--read and remember everything and you'll do well. Whereas the US undergrad system is less about how much memorize, but about being able to argue a point and defend it.
    I have to disagree, because this is PRECISELY what Oxford is about?! What Oxford (and Cambridge) unlike other UK unis is famous for really is the tutorial system, which allows you to defend and discuss your arguments one on one regularly with your tutor, and in the interviews this is why they look for your ability to think on the spot instead of how much (facts) you already know. This tutorial system is what makes these two unis quite unique (but I'm not saying this method is superior in any sense because I'm not one to judge) and so disregarding this system or calling it rote learning is so utterly incorrect!
    Just thought I should clarify that because the way you put it implies the opposite of the truth and might confuse others. Maybe your experiences were different because you weren't reading for a normal undergraduate degree, but what I said above is the norm. What you say about structure is indeed true, although there are a fair number of options to choose from depending on what subject you are reading. (choice of more than 80 papers in one year for one case).
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    Bloop, are you still there? I got a question concerning the Princeton application. If I applied last year, didn't get in though, then took a year off, would you say it's pointless to reapply this year? I mean, how do you think they treat students applying for the second time? Also, what's the financial aid like for international students? Thanks
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    What are the best Universities out there for sports & coaching degrees?
 
 
 
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