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Do violent video games influence real-life violence? watch

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    I would say yes. Video games have become very realistic and if you look at many killers and terrorists they have played violent video games.

    I'm not saying violent video games are necessarily bad, just that they can desensitise people and normalise killing etc. Obviously there has to be underlying issues with the individual in question, but without such violent video games I don't think many of the crimes we see today would happen.
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    Many killers have played violent video games because many people have played violent video games. I'm not denying that for some people it could influence them in that way, but making the link simply because they have played a violent game is a bit off the mark considering the number of males in the age range of 15-40 have played violent video games (or watched violent films, read violent books, etc.)

    It recently came to light that Sandy Hook Killer played video games. In particular there was one he seemed obsessed with. That game was Dance Dance Revolution.
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    Sure, and pub scenes in Eastenders are responsible for binge drinking.

    Hmm, or maybe we're both talking dog ****?
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    No.

    The fact that i've murdered 0 hookers IRL supports my argument.
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    (Original post by MTR_10)
    I would say yes. Video games have become very realistic and if you look at many killers and terrorists they have played violent video games.

    I'm not saying violent video games are necessarily bad, just that they can desensitise people and normalise killing etc. Obviously there has to be underlying issues with the individual in question, but without such violent video games I don't think many of the crimes we see today would happen.
    Violence existed way before video games and it certainly was more prevalent than what we have today.
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    Look at the old looney tunes cartoons and tom and jerry, did that make people violent?
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    Why does no one think there were killers before video games? :confused:
    All this "what's the world coming to?" when a violent crime has been committed- the world has always been like this.
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    Not in any meaningful way. There may be a small number of individuals who draw inspiration from stuff that they see in video games, but chances are such people were already on their way to perpetrating some really nasty ****. The vilification of video games in the old media and by a segment of the public is, I think, more to do with unfamiliarity than anything else. Every generation seems to fabricate its own moral crisis to worry about: in the fifties and sixties it was Elvis' hips. Today it's video games.

    There is nothing particular to video game violence that makes it more likely to influence someone to commit a similar act in the real world. Portrayals of violence happen just as often in other media, and in some, they are far more emotionally affecting. If you're looking for a truly visceral portrayal of violence in the media, pick up a book. Books have a direct line into your brain: every little gory detail on the page is imagined and added to the whole horrid picture that's being put together inside your head. You're transported to that place, at that time, and even into the minds of the perpetrators and the victims. There is no other form of media that allows the consumer to empathise so much with the characters involved. The emotional transferrence between page and reader can sometimes be intense: I've never really cried watching a film or playing a game, but bloody hell, the waterworks have turned on plenty of times while reading a book.

    And yet, no one's concerned that books might be prompting people to maim and murder. Funny that.

    (Original post by MTR_10)
    I'm not saying violent video games are necessarily bad, just that they can desensitise people and normalise killing etc. Obviously there has to be underlying issues with the individual in question, but without such violent video games I don't think many of the crimes we see today would happen.
    I really don't see how video games "normalise" killing. There are no deaths in video games: only portrayals of deaths, and a small child can quite readily tell the difference between the two.
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    (Original post by martin jol)
    No.

    The fact that i've murdered 0 hookers IRL supports my argument.
    Martin, you've murdered Fulham FC though, explain that.

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    I'm curious to know what game Osama Bin Laden played:lol:

    'Flight Simulator'
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    I take great pleasure in wandering the streets and shooting random people in the head. It is particularly satisfying if their blood makes a nice splatter pattern on the wall. What is so wrong with that?
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    No. I play DBZ games and that doesn't cause me to shoot more kamehameha waves in real life :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    I take great pleasure in wandering the streets and shooting random people in the head. It is particularly satisfying if their blood makes a nice splatter pattern on the wall. What is so wrong with that?
    Exactly.
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    (Original post by Black&WhiteFFC)
    Martin, you've murdered Fulham FC though, explain that.

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    That's extremely unfair. It's the lazy players that destroyed Fulham, not Martin Jol.
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    I bring out my old adage:

    " correlation does not imply causation"
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    (Original post by kidomo)
    That's extremely unfair. It's the lazy players that destroyed Fulham, not Martin Jol.
    Without going off topic too much, Jol bought all of the lazy players into the club.

    I think people want to play violent games because it's so far from reality. The problem lies when just playing video games isn't satisfying enough for some people, but it's not the video games that cause the violent behavior, if anything it provides the innate excitement that we seek without carrying out violent acts IRL.

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    It's more accurate to say video games turn people into hermits. World of Warcraft tho. Rather than cause violence
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    No.
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    (Original post by Gjaykay)
    No. I play DBZ games and that doesn't cause me to shoot more kamehameha waves in real life :rolleyes:
    Pff i shoot Spirit Bomb for lunch:awesome:
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    (Original post by MTR_10)
    I would say yes. Video games have become very realistic and if you look at many killers and terrorists they have played violent video games.

    I'm not saying violent video games are necessarily bad, just that they can desensitise people and normalise killing etc. Obviously there has to be underlying issues with the individual in question, but without such violent video games I don't think many of the crimes we see today would happen.
    There is a difference between causation and correlation.

    Video games don't make people shoot others. Those people have other more deep lying problems. Consider the classic example of psychopaths, some kill animals as children then humans as adults. So does killing animals make you kill humans or is it just a first step?

    I agree, GTA might make raping hookers and bashing peoples' heads in seem normal, but in my opinion, people would do it with or without GTA.
 
 
 
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