lilypark_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
So, I would really appreciate some honest opinions!!
I'm 16 years old music scholar and currently studying for my AS Levels and I have been playing piano for 10 years and violin for 8 years. I am sitting my grade 8 exam in both instruments next term! At school I do orchestra, choir, chamber choir, pop band and I was also part of a county orchestra.

At first,my parents made me do piano so that I wasn't just academic and at first it was a bit of a chore but now music's become my life, which is why I also took up the violin.

My A level options are : music, history, economics and English literature. At GCSE music achieved A*.

Basically, my parents didn't think music would be more than a small hobby and that I would become so obsessed with it, and when I told them I wanted to do music, they were not very happy.

My back up course is to do English Literature or Law but my dream is to do music at the royal academy, and I just wanted some honest opinions on whether I would stand the slightest chance of getting into RAM and take a risk?

Thank you!
0
reply
Metamorphosis646
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
(Original post by lilypark_)
So, I would really appreciate some honest opinions!!
I'm 16 years old music scholar and currently studying for my AS Levels and I have been playing piano for 10 years and violin for 8 years. I am sitting my grade 8 exam in both instruments next term! At school I do orchestra, choir, chamber choir, pop band and I was also part of a county orchestra.

At first,my parents made me do piano so that I wasn't just academic and at first it was a bit of a chore but now music's become my life, which is why I also took up the violin.

My A level options are : music, history, economics and English literature. At GCSE music achieved A*.

Basically, my parents didn't think music would be more than a small hobby and that I would become so obsessed with it, and when I told them I wanted to do music, they were not very happy.

My back up course is to do English Literature or Law but my dream is to do music at the royal academy, and I just wanted some honest opinions on whether I would stand the slightest chance of getting into RAM and take a risk?

Thank you!

I hope you won't feel too disheartened, but the honest (and realistic) answer is no. If you were a singer or were learning an instrument which isn't as popular (such as the double bass), I would say you could seriously consider it. Where violin and piano are concerned, however, it will just be too competitive. I am saying this because I was in a similar situation to yourself- I started off playing violin 'as a hobby', then happened to get good at it, at least compared to others at my school and in my local orchestra. I actually wish my parents had taken more of an interest in my A level and university choices, as there were all sorts of things I could have done (in areas such as science and maths as well as in the arts), considering that I did well across the whole range in my GCSEs. My parents' indifference to my choices led me to choose to study music as, not having seen what else was out there, I thought I was good and had a chance of becoming a professional orchestral musician. Not having been given any realistic advice from either parents or teachers, I tried to get into prestigious music colleges such as the Royal Northern and was gutted when I didn't get in. However, I later found out that people selected to study at places such as the RNCM and RAM to specialise in popular instruments such as violin or piano had very often been to music school, had been having tuition from a teacher at one of these prestigious colleges or had been attending Saturday School at one of them. They had also usually taken Grade 8 by the age of about 14.

I wouldn't like to tell you what to study instead, but I have read in the press that English Literature graduates do not have particularly good employment prospects these days. I am not so sure about Law, so you might want to find out more about your chances of getting a job in this area, although I have seen articles claiming that far too many people do Law degrees compared to the number of available jobs. I don't know how good you are in science subjects but perhaps it would be worth pursuing them? I know of a few people who were in youth orchestras who went off to study medicine, but there are a wide variety of degrees you could do having studied science subjects. Of course you could always do a university degree in music (which is what I did) but think carefully about whether you really want to do this, as there is quite a high chance of you ending up teaching music (rather than being a professional performer) if you choose this route.
2
reply
Flauta
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by lilypark_)
So, I would really appreciate some honest opinions!!
I'm 16 years old music scholar and currently studying for my AS Levels and I have been playing piano for 10 years and violin for 8 years. I am sitting my grade 8 exam in both instruments next term! At school I do orchestra, choir, chamber choir, pop band and I was also part of a county orchestra.

At first,my parents made me do piano so that I wasn't just academic and at first it was a bit of a chore but now music's become my life, which is why I also took up the violin.

My A level options are : music, history, economics and English literature. At GCSE music achieved A*.

Basically, my parents didn't think music would be more than a small hobby and that I would become so obsessed with it, and when I told them I wanted to do music, they were not very happy.

My back up course is to do English Literature or Law but my dream is to do music at the royal academy, and I just wanted some honest opinions on whether I would stand the slightest chance of getting into RAM and take a risk?

Thank you!
If your dream is to do Music at RAM, go for it! It's horrendously competitive though so do remember that there are other 8 conservatoires you could study at in the UK so it'd be well worth looking into them too. It's your decision what you want to study, not your parents. You need to pick something you'll be happy spending the next 3 years doing and that prepares you well for what you want to do. If you don't get in you could always take a different well respected course at university, I never applied to conservatoires but I'm planning on taking LTCL or LRSM whilst studying Maths in a couple years time
1
reply
Flauta
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by anon_flute)
.
Hey, just read all of your reply and it was very helpful to me too It's good to know that you've met some successful people who didn't have a music degree, I decided to not audition because as you said flute is incredibly competitive (I think I read somewhere that like 22% of flautists got an undergrad offer at one particular place) but I'm not regretting it in the slightest. Best of luck with your audition, what're you playing for it?
0
reply
Metamorphosis646
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
anon_flute- I am staggered by what you have just said, and am very impressed by what you have achieved given your previous background. I have not met anyone who plays a classical instrument to a high standard who has managed to avoid the grade exam system- I could scarcely believe it when I read that you know someone who is a top professional who failed the ABRSM diploma a few times! Re. what you said about A level grades, I have certainly met people who went to music college who did not do well at A level, so that certainly shouldn't exclude someone from a career as a musician. I think the best thing for the OP to do is to have a consultation with someone from the college of his/her choice, then perhaps even some lessons from that person (although these could be quite expensive). Flauta- I think yours is a good plan. I actually received some violin lessons for a while from someone who had studied Maths at Oxford, then did a postgrad at the Guildhall and is now a professional violinist. It should be noted, however, that as a child she had received lessons from one of the top violin teachers in the country.
0
reply
Grizzly_Bear
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
I have to agree with the posts mentioned above, RAM is extremely difficult to get into.

Like mentioned before I don't want you to feel disheartened but the number of places and applicants is just ridiculous. I am a double bassist myself and even with fewer double bass applicants theres still way to many applicants.

You have to remember that there are junior conservatoires and private schools (Wells, Purcell, some others... I can't remember) that all are applying for conservatoires, which isn't exactly fair. (but then music never is)

Anyway the CV from the people who have been given places has been amazing as these schools often have world wild competition.

I have applied to Birmingham and Trinity this year and I would still recommend all the other courses but the standard is still very high. I know quite a few gradutes from LCM who went onto post-graduate study at RAM.

Also grades make absolutely no difference to whether or not they'll give you a place, it really is down to your CV and how you play on the day.

I know a local pianist who has played with some of the top jazz musicians in the country and still didn't get a place at RAM, remember there are plenty of other great conservatoire and some of the teacher often teach between different conservatoires.
0
reply
lilypark_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by Metamorphosis646)
I hope you won't feel too disheartened, but the honest (and realistic) answer is no. If you were a singer or were learning an instrument which isn't as popular (such as the double bass), I would say you could seriously consider it. Where violin and piano are concerned, however, it will just be too competitive. I am saying this because I was in a similar situation to yourself- I started off playing violin 'as a hobby', then happened to get good at it, at least compared to others at my school and in my local orchestra. I actually wish my parents had taken more of an interest in my A level and university choices, as there were all sorts of things I could have done (in areas such as science and maths as well as in the arts), considering that I did well across the whole range in my GCSEs. My parents' indifference to my choices led me to choose to study music as, not having seen what else was out there, I thought I was good and had a chance of becoming a professional orchestral musician. Not having been given any realistic advice from either parents or teachers, I tried to get into prestigious music colleges such as the Royal Northern and was gutted when I didn't get in. However, I later found out that people selected to study at places such as the RNCM and RAM to specialise in popular instruments such as violin or piano had very often been to music school, had been having tuition from a teacher at one of these prestigious colleges or had been attending Saturday School at one of them. They had also usually taken Grade 8 by the age of about 14.

I wouldn't like to tell you what to study instead, but I have read in the press that English Literature graduates do not have particularly good employment prospects these days. I am not so sure about Law, so you might want to find out more about your chances of getting a job in this area, although I have seen articles claiming that far too many people do Law degrees compared to the number of available jobs. I don't know how good you are in science subjects but perhaps it would be worth pursuing them? I know of a few people who were in youth orchestras who went off to study medicine, but there are a wide variety of degrees you could do having studied science subjects. Of course you could always do a university degree in music (which is what I did) but think carefully about whether you really want to do this, as there is quite a high chance of you ending up teaching music (rather than being a professional performer) if you choose this route.
Thank you so much for a detailed answer. I've been in so many arguments with my parents over this and I'm not disheartened at all by you or any of the other comments, I just needed the truth because all my friends would go 'you're amazing lily' but that's friends for you.
I have absolutely no problem sticking to music as a hobby, I was just worried whether I would ever regret not taking music and look back and think, what if?

Just in case music doesn't work out, I have been preparing for Law, I've received work experience (shadowing) and also experienced some court cases. I value what you say that Law is extremely tough to succeed in after university. In music you need talent, whereas I think if I tried my utmost best in my A levels, I have a chance of getting a good placement after Law

In my music class currently, I have 2 very close male friends who are both massively talented. They're both definite about pursuing music as a career, and I guess I'm just jealous that they can both do what they want...
0
reply
lilypark_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by anon_flute)
Hi lilypark_

I've never posted on this forum before - but a random google search has brought your post to my attention. I felt compelled to answer after reading the first response to your question.

Before I go on - a little about me. I completed my undergraduate degree at the Royal Northern College of Music and am currently auditioning for master's degrees at the Royal Northern, Royal College and Royal Academy of Music. I've had short break from studying - in which time I have played on multiple occasions with one of the best orchestras in the world and have quickly established a thriving teaching practice - not to mention being in regular demand as a freelance player in orchestras, musicals and operas across the country - as well as having won prizes in two top music competitions. I'm a flute player - so I like to think I know a thing or two about competitive instruments. I'm not telling you this from vanity's sake - but so that you hopefully understand I have an opinion worth considering on the matter. I did not go to a specialist music school.

Undeniably - the standard at every UK music college is very high due to the volume of people applying. This is even more observable at the top institutions (RAM, RCM, Guildhall, RNCM, RCS) as many of these are the first choice for people applying from the world over. This competition is increased dramatically as a piano, violin, flute, clarinet, trumpet (etc) player.

If music has become your LIFE - then you should be the exact sort of person these institutions are looking for. You need to be able to play your pieces and scales to a VERY high standard in auditions (start preparing NOW) but equally you need to demonstrate your utter desperation to pursue a career in music. No matter how good you are - if you don't demonstrate this craving to pursue music professionally in your audition - you will stand little chance of getting in (in my opinion). From a technical point of view - everything you can't do: assume your competitors can - and work like crazy on it.

Many of my colleagues (who have likewise gone on to very successful careers as orchestral musicians, chamber/solo musicians and teachers) have never taken a grade exam in their life. This is absolutely no indication of your ability or potential. I know one such player who has failed their ABRSM diploma exam (three?) times and sits in one of the top seats in one of the countries most prestigious ensembles. I myself failed grade one flute (not to mention the collection of GCSE Bs and A-level Ds (plus one fail) I picked up a school).

My advice to you would be to have a consultation lesson with a TOP teacher at several of the institutions you're interested in. I wouldn't limit yourself to the Royal Academy by any means. There are many, many good players coming out of traditionally less prestigious colleges (RWCMD? BC? LCM?) who are going on to very successful careers. One of the current young hot properties in the orchestral world is an RWCMD grad (and is beating Guildhall, RAM, RCM, RNCM students to most posts). Meet as many people as you can - go on summer schools and for lessons with teachers at the colleges. Professors at either of these will be able to tell you how suitable your playing CURRENTLY is for music college. Above all - work hard - and listen to as many great performers as you can.

And if you don't get in to music college? No biggy. If music really is your LIFE and your work and determination reflects that you will give yourself a very good chance of succeeding.

I know two maths graduates and one languages graduate who are three of the most successful flute players in the country. Similarly, I know dozens of music college graduates who work in retail, law, as doctors - etc etc..

Get some professional advice! Please feel free to ask any questions.

P.S. Absolutely no disrespect to the poster above. Theirs is a valid opinion - but I thought you should see the other side of the coin from a music professional.
I completely understand what you're trying to say, and I appreciate that you took the time to reply to me,it's been a massive help

Yours is a very different view to the other posts but I can see where both of you are coming from.
In all honesty, I lack a lot of self-confidence and take even the slightest criticism to heart, and I can be very negative. I don't mean negative as in I'm horrible to people (or at least I hope not!) but I'll always be expecting the worst. I know for a musician that is a very bad thing, but like you've mentioned, I do have a passion for it.
But it's not a be all and end all, if I try and see a positive view from this, I guess there are millions of people out there who are suffering so I should be grateful for even having a chance to go to university

Your background is inspiring and it sounds as if you have achieved a lot, more than I ever will. I have my grade 8 piano and violin in the Spring and Summer so I guess after that, we'll see where it leads me. Hopefully, I will get some offers from universities! I hope you become even more successful in the future, and thank you
0
reply
lilypark_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by Flauta)
If your dream is to do Music at RAM, go for it! It's horrendously competitive though so do remember that there are other 8 conservatoires you could study at in the UK so it'd be well worth looking into them too. It's your decision what you want to study, not your parents. You need to pick something you'll be happy spending the next 3 years doing and that prepares you well for what you want to do. If you don't get in you could always take a different well respected course at university, I never applied to conservatoires but I'm planning on taking LTCL or LRSM whilst studying Maths in a couple years time
Thank you for your advice, I know it's not up to my parents but they are very controlling over me when it comes to my studies. I think I will apply for Law and I'll leave music to fate. If I'm destined to do it, then something will happen. Good luck with your flute and I hope you get offers from your applied universities
0
reply
Flauta
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by lilypark_)
Thank you for your advice, I know it's not up to my parents but they are very controlling over me when it comes to my studies. I think I will apply for Law and I'll leave music to fate. If I'm destined to do it, then something will happen. Good luck with your flute and I hope you get offers from your applied universities
Thank you, got an offer yesterday Best of luck with whatever you decide to do, even if you choose not to go into a career of music it will always be a fantastic hobby
0
reply
lilypark_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by Grizzly_Bear)
I have to agree with the posts mentioned above, RAM is extremely difficult to get into.

Like mentioned before I don't want you to feel disheartened but the number of places and applicants is just ridiculous. I am a double bassist myself and even with fewer double bass applicants theres still way to many applicants.

You have to remember that there are junior conservatoires and private schools (Wells, Purcell, some others... I can't remember) that all are applying for conservatoires, which isn't exactly fair. (but then music never is)

Anyway the CV from the people who have been given places has been amazing as these schools often have world wild competition.

I have applied to Birmingham and Trinity this year and I would still recommend all the other courses but the standard is still very high. I know quite a few gradutes from LCM who went onto post-graduate study at RAM.

Also grades make absolutely no difference to whether or not they'll give you a place, it really is down to your CV and how you play on the day.

I know a local pianist who has played with some of the top jazz musicians in the country and still didn't get a place at RAM, remember there are plenty of other great conservatoire and some of the teacher often teach between different conservatoires.
this has been really helpful, and I kind of realised already that grades weren't really useful when it comes to music, or any other type of arts. I think the competition's too strong for me, and all my friends think I'm giving up on my dream but I guess at the same time, I am 16 so I have to be mature and think realistically.
Good luck and I hope you get a place at either Birmingham or Trinity!
0
reply
lilypark_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#12
(Original post by Flauta)
Thank you, got an offer yesterday Best of luck with whatever you decide to do, even if you choose not to go into a career of music it will always be a fantastic hobby
Aw that's great Thank you, I know and I feel lucky that I can play a musical instrument let alone do it as a career
1
reply
M1011
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 years ago
#13
(Original post by anon_flute)
I know two maths graduates and one languages graduate who are three of the most successful flute players in the country. Similarly, I know dozens of music college graduates who work in retail, law, as doctors - etc etc..
Tell me more about these dozens of music grads who work as doctors?

I must avoid this hospital
0
reply
ChocolateLover94
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 6 years ago
#14
(Original post by lilypark_)
Thank you so much for a detailed answer. I've been in so many arguments with my parents over this and I'm not disheartened at all by you or any of the other comments, I just needed the truth because all my friends would go 'you're amazing lily' but that's friends for you.
I have absolutely no problem sticking to music as a hobby, I was just worried whether I would ever regret not taking music and look back and think, what if?

Just in case music doesn't work out, I have been preparing for Law, I've received work experience (shadowing) and also experienced some court cases. I value what you say that Law is extremely tough to succeed in after university. In music you need talent, whereas I think if I tried my utmost best in my A levels, I have a chance of getting a good placement after Law

In my music class currently, I have 2 very close male friends who are both massively talented. They're both definite about pursuing music as a career, and I guess I'm just jealous that they can both do what they want...
I think you should definitely give it a go. Even if you don't get an offer it's a good experience. A good person to get advice from is your instrument teachers they would be the best at evaluating your ability. Also you could have consultation lessons with the teachers at the conservatories and that would also give you an idea of whether to apply.
I think you might regret it if you didn't try.
It's always good to have a back up plan aswell. I'm also looking at law as a back up but applying to do geography at undergrad then apply to law school. I did work experience at the Supreme Court in Ghana to help with that. It's also good to have something separate from music that you enjoy aswell. You could even still do music as hobby whilst doing law still to a high standard.

Personally I've just finished my conservatoire auditions (RAM, RCS, Trinity and Guildhall). I applied for voice and I only started lessons five years ago in addition to violin and recorder which I started from a much younger age. I started my way up from Grade 5 to Grade 8. I did get into Junior Trinity which helped to further my music study but I wasn't aware that I could apply to a conservatoire as I didn't think I was good enough. I told my teacher there and he said I was good enough and I should go for it and helped me to prepare for auditions. It's good to have people around you who believe in you. Even if it's you're friends saying your amazing 😄
My parents are still a bit wary but they're happy I've got a back up if I don't get in to anywhere.

Which instrument do you want to do as your principal study? Even through there are a lot of applicants you might as well try and it's a great experience.
But definitely the main person who can really say if you're ready is your music teacher.

Wish you all the best.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Grizzly_Bear
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 6 years ago
#15
Got a reserved Unconditional from Trinity which is a half-hearted yay! As I now have to wait for a place to become available.

I still think you should apply especially as you have many years a head of you, I had a complete change of musical direction from last year. Got an unconditional to study popular music at Goldsmiths and It was also extremely competitive but in the back my mind I thought, why didn't I apply to Conservatoires?

I knew I would of regretted my choice and I gambled it all and re-applied for Conservatoires this year. I'm now on my second gap year (unplanned) but I'm glad I made the right choice.

The best advice I would give is having lessons with a tutor from one of the conservatoires, I have had a few different teachers, some good, some not so great. Getting tuition off the best will often pay off, after having a consultation the tutor ripped my playing apart (In a nice way) and completed changed my approach which was good because if I didn't I would of failed the audition.

In term of grades do your best but I got three A*'s for A level and they mean absolutely zilch. I wish I spend more time practicing (not that I didn't practice because I did) but I would of spend more time playing and less time writing meaningless essays.
0
reply
Nick Pope
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by anon_flute)
@Metamorphosis646 […] In my view (although this almost never happens), students are better off spending the money on […] high quality recordings. This is reflected in the biographies of many slightly older performers, who didn't have exams to take, and just spent all of their pocket money on great records.
This advice is of course key, but it needs updating.

For years, I have striven to ensure that I never hear any piece of recorded sound twice. So if I needed to get to know a sonata, symphony or opera, I worked hard (in the old days) to borrow LPs and (latterly) CDs—hearing artists great and small, but always giving them straight back as soon as heard once. This avoided the great damage that gets done when we become brainwashed by exposure to repeats. That damage begins with the second hearing, when we begin to fall in love with the sound—i.e. become addicted to it.


Now, however, we live in a new world, with spotify.com and other lookalike websites that offer a back-catalogue that a record-collector can only dream of.

What is it there for?

Why of course, so that we can broaden our horizons, and preserve ourselves from harm, in one fell swoop. Listen to every ‘cover’ version you can find, then forget them all!
0
reply
07_pianist
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
Hello!! I am from the Philippines and wishing to enter at year 2015. Here are the schools I am applying in order of preference:


CUKAS- Welsh, Trinity, Birmingham and Scottish
UCAS- LCM, Holloway, Cardiff, Goldsmiths and Sheffield


My prospect school is RWCMD and hopefully they will accept me and give an entrance scholarship. Here are my pieces for audition:
Bach- Prelude and fugue no. 12 in f minor bwv 881
Brahms - Rhapsody op. 79 no. 1 in b minor
Schumann - 1st mov of Piano Sonata no. 2 in g minor
(maybe) Chopin- Nocturne op. 27 no. 2 in Major


i will be auditioning through DVD. Any thoughts? I am really nervous whether they will accept me. Hopefully because I really want to study at RWCMD.


Currently, I am on my 3rd yr at a local university taling BMus degree w/o Hons. My principal study is piano. Hopefully I will start at year 1 on an institution @ UK (and i hope it is welsh). ) so nervous now.


I really need a scholarship though. If I won't make it on conservatoires, I will pursue on universities but I need scholarship. Really getting mad about this. Help please.
0
reply
lidzyboo
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
I want to say that you have a good chance but thinking about every single candidate your'e up against, and that its taken you ten years and eight years to reach grade 8 at 16 im not sure you were quick enough; a lot of young musicians especially in such popular instruments as piano and violin will have done their multiple grade 8's years ago, and most who are serious about the London conservatoires will have either started their diploma or will have got a diploma; certainly for first study piano or violin you it will be expected that you are well past grade8 by the time you audition....
imm sorry to say this but if you are serious bout music then perhaps look at a more academic course with lower performance requirements.
0
reply
lilypark_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#19
Thanks everyone for your advice!
I thought about it and in the end, I applied for law and submitted my application in last month and already received 2 offers!
0
reply
minidom
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 years ago
#20
(Original post by lilypark_)
So, I would really appreciate some honest opinions!!
I'm 16 years old music scholar and currently studying for my AS Levels and I have been playing piano for 10 years and violin for 8 years. I am sitting my grade 8 exam in both instruments next term! At school I do orchestra, choir, chamber choir, pop band and I was also part of a county orchestra.

At first,my parents made me do piano so that I wasn't just academic and at first it was a bit of a chore but now music's become my life, which is why I also took up the violin.

My A level options are : music, history, economics and English literature. At GCSE music achieved A*.

Basically, my parents didn't think music would be more than a small hobby and that I would become so obsessed with it, and when I told them I wanted to do music, they were not very happy.

My back up course is to do English Literature or Law but my dream is to do music at the royal academy, and I just wanted some honest opinions on whether I would stand the slightest chance of getting into RAM and take a risk?

Thank you!

As a mother of 4, one of whom is a straight A student (as in 2 As &2A*s in academic subject for A level) who was determined to study dance, (and now is) and one who did a BA Hons in an unrelated subject and is now applying to do a masters in opera. I would say:
1) go for a pre audition lesson at one of the music colleges, they will tell you if you have a chance and which weaknesses to work on. It will be worth every penny.
2) get in some audition practices in
3) have a back up plan or 2, eg a lesser uni and be prepared to teach music or something totally unrelated. Discuss these with your parents, so they can see that you are thinking maturely about everything.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 23 Jan '20
  • SOAS University of London
    Development Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Anthropology and Sociology, Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Arts, Economics, Law, History, Religions and Philosophies, Politics and International Studies, Finance and Management, East Asian Languages & Cultures Postgraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20
  • University of Huddersfield
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20

How many universities have you heard back from?

0 (85)
13.2%
1 (86)
13.35%
2 (84)
13.04%
19.25%
22.2%
18.94%

Watched Threads

View All