sarah :)
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I have an interview at Exeter on Thursday, and I just want to clarify the process after FY1/2 in case I am asked. I understand that since 2005 a MMC training programme has been introduced, and from what I have read there are two courses of training.

Uncoupled - CT1+2, then in at ST3 onwards.
Run-through - ST1 onwards
GP - Three years after FY2

Can anyone clarify this?

Thanks
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Ienjoylife
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(Original post by sarah :))
I have an interview at Exeter on Thursday, and I just want to clarify the process after FY1/2 in case I am asked. I understand that since 2005 a MMC training programme has been introduced, and from what I have read there are two courses of training.

Uncoupled - CT1+2, then in at ST3 onwards.
Run-through - ST1 onwards
GP - Three years after FY2

Can anyone clarify this?

Thanks
On the whole it is pretty much correct though of course there are exceptions.
Some specialities are also uncouples ST1+2 / ST3+4+5+6 which means you start that speciality for 2 years and then need to reapply to progress further. CT1 and 2 are only for medicine and surgery (+ anaesthesia/EM) and are generic training schemes.
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sarah :)
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(Original post by Ienjoylife)
On the whole it is pretty much correct though of course there are exceptions.
Some specialities are also uncouples ST1+2 / ST3+4+5+6 which means you start that speciality for 2 years and then need to reapply to progress further. CT1 and 2 are only for medicine and surgery (+ anaesthesia/EM) and are generic training schemes.
Thank you very much so anything bar general med/surgery is straight in at ST1 for however many years it takes for each one. (With some needing reapplication as you say).
Was GP correct?
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DoctorInTraining
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(Original post by sarah :))
I have an interview at Exeter on Thursday, and I just want to clarify the process after FY1/2 in case I am asked. I understand that since 2005 a MMC training programme has been introduced, and from what I have read there are two courses of training.

Uncoupled - CT1+2, then in at ST3 onwards.
Run-through - ST1 onwards
GP - Three years after FY2

Can anyone clarify this?

Thanks
Best website - modernising medical careers by the NHS - www.mmc.nhs.uk

That is pretty much right though - although the GP programme has been changed recently so I think it might now be 4 years after F2
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sarah :)
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(Original post by DoctorInTraining)
Best website - modernising medical careers by the NHS - www.mmc.nhs.uk

That is pretty much right though - although the GP programme has been changed recently so I think it might now be 4 years after F2
- Super, thankyou!
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Asklepios
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(Original post by sarah :))
Thank you very much so anything bar general med/surgery is straight in at ST1 for however many years it takes for each one. (With some needing reapplication as you say).
Was GP correct?
Yeah, GP is correct. But most specialities come under medicine or surgery - like if you want to be a cardiologist, you do 2 years of core medical training (CT1-CT2) then 5 years (ST3-8) of specialist training in cardiology. You'd need to core medical training for things like neurology, gastroenterology, respiratory medicine, nephrology etc. Similar with say Orthopaedic surgery - two years of core surgical training then specialist training in orthopaedic surgery.
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sarah :)
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(Original post by Asklepios)
Yeah, GP is correct. But most specialities come under medicine or surgery - like if you want to be a cardiologist, you do 2 years of core medical training (CT1-CT2) then 5 years (ST3-8) of specialist training in cardiology. You'd need to core medical training for things like neurology, gastroenterology, respiratory medicine, nephrology etc. Similar with say Orthopaedic surgery - two years of core surgical training then specialist training in orthopaedic surgery.
So its really only extremely specialised fields of medicine or things that don't relate to med or surgery like public health or pathology where you go through the run-through programme?
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Asklepios
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(Original post by sarah :))
So its really only extremely specialised fields of medicine or things that don't relate to med or surgery like public health or pathology where you go through the run-through programme?
Yep, I think neurosurgery is a run-through programme instead of core surgical training first though. Other run-through ones would be things like radiology, microbiology/virology, ophthalmology, obs&gynae. MIght be more but I'm just a first year medical student so don't know really

The core training ones are Core medical training, core surgical training, and ACCS (acute care common stem - which can lead to emergency medicine, acute medicine, anaesthetics).

Edit: http://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk/...2014-v1.41.pdf see pages 27 and 28 for them all.
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Becca-Sarah
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(Original post by sarah :))
So its really only extremely specialised fields of medicine or things that don't relate to med or surgery like public health or pathology where you go through the run-through programme?
To complicate things further, it also depends where you are. In Scotland Orthopaedics is still run-through.
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EvPhTrainee2b?
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[QUOTE=Asklepios;45401748]Yep, I think neurosurgery is a run-through programme instead of core surgical training first though. Other run-through ones would be things like radiology, microbiology/virology, ophthalmology, obs&gynae. MIght be more but I'm just a first year medical student so don't know really

The core training ones are Core medical training, core surgical training, and ACCS (acute care common stem - which can lead to emergency medicine, acute medicine, anaesthetic

Hi is anyone applying to do Public Health? currently awaiting the Jan exam?
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Masafi
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Honestly though this is far ahead of anything you're going to be asked. 99% of hospital staff don't understand the (specialty- location- and programme-specific) differences between FY2, CT2, ST2, SHO, SpR, StR, staff grade, clinical fellow, trust grade, associate specialist, etc etc.

Your understanding from the first post is more than enough!
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