International Students becoming UK Lawyers.

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demiroux
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Imagine an International Student, without a UK Visa wishes to study Law and even wants to become a Solicitor/Barrister in the UK..
is it impossible? say he/she has amazing grades at Uni, will he/she get pushed down by employers because he/she is not from the UK?
Do International Students with good grades have a good chance of working in the UK? Or is it rare?

Thanks.
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arrowhead
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(Original post by demiroux)
Imagine an International Student, without a UK Visa wishes to study Law and even wants to become a Solicitor/Barrister in the UK..
is it impossible? say he/she has amazing grades at Uni, will he/she get pushed down by employers because he/she is not from the UK?
Do International Students with good grades have a good chance of working in the UK? Or is it rare?

Thanks.
It's possible, but more for soliciting than becoming a Barrister, I would say. If you are a qualified lawyer abroad, you can transfer and become qualified in England and Wales: https://sra.org.uk/faqs/contact-cent...ew-scheme.page

If you plan on attending uni in Britain, then you definitely have a shot at qualifying as a solicitor. I'm an international student myself and I have a training contract at a law firm.
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demiroux
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(Original post by arrowhead)
It's possible, but more for soliciting than becoming a Barrister, I would say. If you are a qualified lawyer abroad, you can transfer and become qualified in England and Wales: <a rel="nofollow" href="https://sra.org.uk/faqs/contact-centre/solicitors/qualified-lawyers-transfer-scheme-qlts/01-how-to-apply/eligible-to-apply-under-new-scheme.page" target="_blank">https://sra.org.uk/faqs/contact-centre/solicitors/qualified-lawyers-transfer-scheme-qlts/01-how-to-apply/eligible-to-apply-under-new-scheme.page</a><br />
<br />
If you plan on attending uni in Britain, then you definitely have a shot at qualifying as a solicitor. I'm an international student myself and I have a training contract at a law firm.
<br />
<br />

Wow! Thanks so much. This is really good information.
Also, if you don't mind, what's a barrister got over a solicitor? And do you want to be a solicitor really, or it's because you can't be a barrister in the UK?
Thanks!
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by demiroux)
<br />
<br />

Wow! Thanks so much. This is really good information.
Also, if you don't mind, what's a barrister got over a solicitor? And do you want to be a solicitor really, or it's because you can't be a barrister in the UK?
Thanks!
All barristers have a right of audience before the highest courts. For solicitors it is an additional qualification that relatively few non-criminal solicitors seek and obtain. As a result the vast majority of the senior judiciary are barristers.

However, these technical differences do not really embrace the distinction between solicitors who are principally organised in law firms ranging from the small to the very large, who attract and retain individuals and companies as clients and aim to provide those clients with a wide range of legal services, the majority of which are not concerned with litigation; and barristers, who practice as sole traders and merely share a little administrative support. Barristers mostly carry out two roles. Most of the time, most of them act as specialist advocates in court proceedings. Barristers also act as specialist advisers to solicitors in their particular specialist areas of law.

The most successful barristers will earn more than the most successful solicitors but there are many more solicitors with high earnings than there are barristers with high earnings.

At the present time, it is very difficult to get the opportunity to train as a barrister and so for many it is true they could not have become barristers if they had wanted to. However, in the past when it was much easier to become a barrister, relatively few people wanted to become barristers because it has always been seen as a financially risky profession where a few make enormous earnings but many leave because they cannot make a success of it.

It is probably fair to say that successful barristers have the more intellectually rewarding occupation. However successful solicitors are usually running a substantial business. To describe a self-employed barrister as having a business would be like describing an author or a comedian as having a business. It is quite difficult to attract successful solicitors to be judges (which will entail a significant loss of income) whilst there is no shortage of barristers happy in their later years to accept the salaried position of a judge.
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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
All barristers have a right of audience before the highest courts. For solicitors it is an additional qualification that relatively few non-criminal solicitors seek and obtain. As a result the vast majority of the senior judiciary are barristers.

However, these technical differences do not really embrace the distinction between solicitors who are principally organised in law firms ranging from the small to the very large, who attract and retain individuals and companies as clients and aim to provide those clients with a wide range of legal services, the majority of which are not concerned with litigation; and barristers, who practice as sole traders and merely share a little administrative support. Barristers mostly carry out two roles. Most of the time, most of them act as specialist advocates in court proceedings. Barristers also act as specialist advisers to solicitors in their particular specialist areas of law.

The most successful barristers will earn more than the most successful solicitors but there are many more solicitors with high earnings than there are barristers with high earnings.

At the present time, it is very difficult to get the opportunity to train as a barrister and so for many it is true they could not have become barristers if they had wanted to. However, in the past when it was much easier to become a barrister, relatively few people wanted to become barristers because it has always been seen as a financially risky profession where a few make enormous earnings but many leave because they cannot make a success of it.

It is probably fair to say that successful barristers have the more intellectually rewarding occupation. However successful solicitors are usually running a substantial business. To describe a self-employed barrister as having a business would be like describing an author or a comedian as having a business. It is quite difficult to attract successful solicitors to be judges (which will entail a significant loss of income) whilst there is no shortage of barristers happy in their later years to accepted the salaried position of a judge.
Partners you mean. Regular solicitors earn peanuts. Even MC ones for the amount of hours they put in. It is good for exit options (does not mean you'll get paid more after you leave, however. Seniority somewhere else /=/ definite higher pay), and getting the know how to set up on your own, but, other than that the remuneration even in London is not great.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Mr_Vain)
Partners you mean. Regular solicitors earn peanuts. Even MC ones for the amount of hours they put in. It is good for exit options (does not mean you'll get paid more after you leave, however. Seniority somewhere else /=/ definite higher pay), and getting the know how to set up on your own, but, other than that the remuneration even in London is not great.
Yes, I do mean partners but I still struggle with this idea that people enter the solicitors' profession without the reasonable expectation of a partnership somewhere, albeit perhaps in not as grand a firm as that in which they trained. I'm sure if you said to any of our lot of newly qualifieds that they would never be partners, they would be off somewhere else like a shot.
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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Yes, I do mean partners but I still struggle with this idea that people enter the solicitors' profession without the reasonable expectation of a partnership somewhere, albeit perhaps in not as grand a firm as that in which they trained. I'm sure if you said to any of our lot of newly qualifieds that they would never be partners, they would be off somewhere else like a shot.
People need hope, as unrealistic as it may be.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Mr_Vain)
People need hope, as unrealistic as it may be.
I don't see why this should be unrealistic.
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Mr_Vain
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
I don't see why this should be unrealistic.
You only get one shot at life. I'd prefer not to waste my best years playing a lottery. And yes, in some egalitarian vision of the world perhaps more people will become partners of the major firms, but it is very few. My cousin is one at an London American firm, he is financially comfortable but it is not the Valhalla people assume it to be. You still have to surround yourself with soulless people day to day and partake in their bull****. He is one of the very few that got there, but even though he got there he wants out as soon as he can. Of course, when you are earning a partner's salary, you can never bring yourself to get out because of time constraints and the relative perceived security of the job.
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Doc.Daneeka
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Another issue re: aiming for partnership is that not every solicitor can become one for the same reason that not all politician's can become PM nor can they all become party leaders. That reason being that you do not need everyone being at the top because then you have no one to do the mundane or dirty work for relatively little, i.e., supply and demand.
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arrowhead
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(Original post by Mr_Vain)
You only get one shot at life. I'd prefer not to waste my best years playing a lottery. And yes, in some egalitarian vision of the world perhaps more people will become partners of the major firms, but it is very few. My cousin is one at an London American firm, he is financially comfortable but it is not the Valhalla people assume it to be. You still have to surround yourself with soulless people day to day and partake in their bull****. He is one of the very few that got there, but even though he got there he wants out as soon as he can. Of course, when you are earning a partner's salary, you can never bring yourself to get out because of time constraints and the relative perceived security of the job.
Yes, but, students are made aware of this when they set out on the corporate law route. Actually I shouldn't generalise, I researched and knew how difficult it was when I started out on this route. Just by getting a training contract in my first round of applications, I've already beaten the odds. Now everything beyond that in my career is up in the air, I might become a Partner one day or I might leave legal practice and run my own business, or open my own practice. People's plans and priorities change as they get older, that's organic.
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